November Cancer Awareness

by GregP_WN

In the month of November we recognize the following cancers and these events:

Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer

There are three main types of lung cancer. Knowing which type you have is important because it affects your treatment options and your outlook (prognosis). If you aren’t sure which type of lung cancer you have, ask your doctor so you can get the right information.

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

This is the most common type of lung cancer. About 85% of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancers. Squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma are all subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer.

Small Cell Lung Cancer

Small cell lung cancer is also called oat cell cancer. About 10%-15% of lung cancers are small cell lung cancers. This type of lung cancer tends to spread quickly.

Lung Carcinoid Tumor

Fewer than 5% of lung cancers are lung carcinoid tumors. They are also sometimes called lung neuroendocrine tumors. Most of these tumors grow slowly and rarely spread.

Read our page "Living With Lung Cancer" at WhatNext

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness

Pancreatic cancer begins in the tissues of your pancreas — an organ in your abdomen that lies horizontally behind the lower part of your stomach. Your pancreas secretes enzymes that aid digestion and hormones that help regulate the metabolism of sugars.

Pancreatic cancer often has a poor prognosis, even when diagnosed early. Pancreatic cancer typically spreads rapidly and is seldom detected in its early stages, which is a major reason why it's a leading cause of cancer death. Signs and symptoms may not appear until pancreatic cancer is quite advanced and complete surgical removal isn't possible.

More from the American Cancer Society on pancreatic cancer.

Our Page "Living With Pancreatic Cancer" at WhatNext

The Great American Smokeout

Great American Smokeout

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout event. Encourage someone you know to use the date to make a plan to quit, or plan in advance and then quit smoking that day. By quitting – even for 1 day – smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk.

About 40 million Americans still smoke cigarettes, and tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the world. While cigarette smoking rates have dropped (from 42% in 1965 to 17% in 2014), cigar, pipe, and hookah – other dangerous and addictive ways to smoke tobacco – are very much on the rise. Smoking kills people – there’s no “safe” way to smoke tobacco.

Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits at any age. Quitting is hard, but you can increase your chances of success with help. Getting help through counseling or medications can double or triple the chances of quitting successfully. 

More from the American Cancer Society on The Great American Smokeout

National Family Caregivers Month 

Caregivers Month

–Celebrated each November -- is a time to recognize and honor family caregivers across the country.

Celebrating Family Caregivers during NFC month enables all of us to:

Raise awareness of family caregiver issues

Celebrate the efforts of family caregivers

Educate family caregivers about self-identification

Increase support for family caregivers

Caregiver Action Network is the organization that chooses the theme for National Family Caregivers Month annually and spearheads celebration of NFC Month nationally. Each year, Caregiver Action Network makes materials available for general use, including the theme, a media kit, posters, sample proclamations, etc.

Caregiver Action Network (the National Family Caregivers Association) began promoting national recognition of family caregivers in 1994. President Clinton signed the first NFC Month Presidential Proclamation in 1997 and every president since has followed suit by issuing an annual proclamation recognizing and honoring family caregivers each November.

Neuroendocrine Tumor Day 

Net Day

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is the umbrella term for a group of unusual, often slow growing cancers, which develop from cells in the diffuse endocrine systems.
They are found most commonly in the lung or gastrointestinal system, but they can arise in other parts of the body, such as the pancreas, ovary and testes, among other sites.

NET Day is November 10th. More on NET Day from NetDay.Org

World Cancer Congress Oct. 31 - Nov. 3rd

World Cancer Congress

WHAT IS THE WORLD CANCER CONGRESS ?

The World Cancer Congress is an award winning conference that is now acknowledged by the global cancer community as the leading international event in cancer implementation science. Delegates thrive on its program's stimulating and innovative features which enable them to exchange best practices in cancer control in a collaborative and inspiring environment. This global conference represents a unique opportunity for the global cancer and wider health community to network, learn, develop meaningful collaborations and drive change together.

The World Cancer Congress is run by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and takes place every two years in a different country, always hosted by a UICC member organization. The conference is aligned with UICC's purpose statement of uniting the cancer community, to reduce the global cancer burden, to promote greater equity and to integrate cancer into the world's health and development agenda.

More from World Cancer Congress.Org

Movember

Movember

Our fathers, partners, brothers and friends face a health crisis that isn’t being talked about. Men are dying too young. We can’t afford to stay silent. That’s why we’re taking action.

We’re the only charity tackling men’s health on a global scale, year round. We’re addressing some of the biggest health issues faced by men: prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and mental health and suicide prevention.

We know what works for men, and how to find and fund the most innovative research to have both a global and local impact. We're independent of government funding, so we can challenge the status quo and invest quicker in what works. In 13 years we’ve funded more than 1,200 men’s health projects around the world.

By 2030 we’ll reduce the number of men dying prematurely by 25%.
Help us stop men dying too young. Join the movement. More from Movember.com

Do you have a local or Statewide event in November to be a part of pancreatic or lung cancer awareness? List them in the comments below!

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