Cancer Treatments, Insights and Other Musings -

I'm a Mother, Wife, and Lung Cancer Survivor

by Sharon McBride

Our Guest Blog Post today is from "CheryNCP" She is a Mother, Grandmother, Wife, career woman, and a lung cancer survivor, as well as an active member of WhatNext. This is her story.

Sam

My name is Sharon McBride but all my friends call me Sam. I am a 66-year-old wife, mother, and grandmother. I live in Mobile, Alabama with my husband Bob and our two cats Grayson and Shadow. I worked in the medical field nearly my entire working life in one capacity or another. I was working part-time as an...

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Surviving Larynx Cancer - And a Misdiagnosis

by GregP_WN

Editor's Note: Our Guest Blog Post today is from WhatNexter "Patches0" she is a 6-year survivor of Larynx cancer, but almost didn't live through a misdiagnosis of COPD to be able to survive cancer. Her story of perseverance is inspiring.  

Patches

About 2010 I started having a lot of difficulty breathing. Worse than normal that is, as I had always been troubled with asthma. But at this time, the coughing and breathing became so bad I was hospitalized several times. My primary doctor kept trying...

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Why I Finally Got a Feeding Tube

by Laura Compston

Editor's note: Today's Blog Post is from "LCompston", she is a two-time survivor of head and neck cancer, that covers over 32 years. She has persevered all of the treatments, the side effects, and everything that cancer has thrown at her over the majority of her life, and she is still happy to be here to tell us about it. Today, she describes what it's like to live with a feeding tube. 

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I resisted getting a feeding tube for as long as I could. I knew I’d have to use one eventually,...

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Hope And The Stage IV Diagnosis

by Jane Ashley

Every cancer patient remembers the day of diagnosis. I refer to that day as “the day time stood still.” The common thread for every story is the deep, gut-wrenching fear that grips you. Some people cry while others sit quietly. Everyone tries to understand the enormity of what they’ve just heard.

Hope And The Stage Iv Diagnosis

Rectal bleeding prompted my referral to a colorectal surgeon. A colonoscopy confirmed I had rectal cancer. The surgeon scheduled chest, abdomen, and pelvic CT scans along with a rectal MRI and told...

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Cancer Facts We Learned From Survivors, Not the Doctor

by GregP_WN

WhatNexter "Cllinda" recently posted a question to the WhatNext Community that asked "What one piece of advice did you gain from this site vs. your doctor? The reason I asked this is because of this site talking about ports. My doctor never mentioned it and I would not have known if it wasn't for this site. Once I asked for it, he agreed to let me have one. But I had to ask for it. So I was wondering what other people have learned about here." 

Cancer Facts We Learned From Survivors, Not The Doctor

These are some of the things that...

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7 Ways Your Inspiring Cancer Story Will Help Others Get Through Theirs

by GregP_WN

Whether you know it or not, you are an inspiring person. Right now there are several people that are watching your journey and thinking to themselves that you are one strong, tough, and inspiring cancer fighter. Other cancer patients that see your story at WhatNext will be inspired and will gain hope simply by reading your story. When other cancer patients read the story of survivors, they gain hope and inspiration and have faith, that if you can do it, then so can they. 

7 Ways Your Inspiring Cancer Story Will Help Others Get Through Theirs

How You Can...

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Cancer's Effect on the Concept of Time

by GregP_WN

You have probably experienced this before throughout your cancer journey, you look at the clock and it says 1:05, then after what seems like 30 minutes, it's only 1:09. Cancer and the anxiety we have when trying to navigate through everything has an effect on our concept of time. It seems to happen in both directions too, it will speed time up or slow it down, depending on the situation.

Be On Time

My Father was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer at the age of 71. I remember sitting with him in the exam...

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Surviving Head and Neck Cancer 2X Over 32 Years

by GregP_WN

Our blog post today is from our WhatNexter of the Week, "LCompston". She is a two-time head and neck cancer survivor and was kind enough to share all of the details of her 32-year journey, the good, bad and ugly.

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I believe my journey started in the 7th and 8th grade of school. It was the start of me surviving head and neck cancer 2X over 32 years. I always had Mono and was in and out of the doctor and on antibiotics all the time. In 8th grade, I had a major math test. Right before the...

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Still Fighting CLL After 12 Years and Still on Top

by GregP_WN

"Still_Fighting" is a 12-year survivor of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), although she is still on maintenance treatments, and likely will be for the rest of her life, she says she is still doing well and living her life. Take a look at her story, and drop by her Homepage at WhatNext and giver her a big CONGRATULATIONS for staying on top in her fight. In this guest blog post, she details her fight with CLL.

Still Fighting Cll After 12 Years

I really didn't have any indications that I had CLL that I was aware of or my...

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Tips For Helping Someone With Cancer

by GregP_WN

Finding out that someone you care about has been hit with a cancer diagnosis is heartbreaking...and confusing. Whether it's a spouse, a parent, a young adult, a friend, a colleague or a child - it's often difficult to know what to say or what to do. Or what to not say or not do! Each case is a little different, but here are some tips for helping someone with cancer.

Friends There For You No Matter What

We turned to our panel of experts on WhatNext - people who have been touched by cancer - and asked them to share some of the...

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