Cancer Treatments, Insights and Other Musings -

A Story of Surviving Stage IV Spindle Cell Sarcomatoid Carcinoma-6 Years

by GregP_WN

Our Guest Blog Post today is from  Nicki Goodwin, "NGoody16". She is a six year survivor of spindle cell sarcomatoid carcinoma. A rather rare form of soft tissue cancer. She describes her life before, during, and after her diagnosis. This is her inspiring story in her own words.

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Nicki with her husband, Jeremy, and son, Bryce on his first day of 1st grade(Sept 2017).

I was 34 years old in the fall of 2012. I was finally getting the hang of being a new mom and wife while juggling my...

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Share Your Own Cancer Story and Inspire Thousands!

by Jane Ashley

Do you want to help others diagnosed with the same kind of cancer that you had?

You Have A Story To Tell

Do you remember those dark days when you were first diagnosed? The fear, the confusion and the “what ifs” were overwhelming. If you are like me, you probably wondered if life would ever would be normal again. Over 1.7 million people in the United States were diagnosed with cancer in 2018 — that’s over 4,900 people every day here in the U.S. who hear the words, “You have cancer.”

Help others by sharing your...

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"Bug"-Her Story of Triumph Over Breast Cancer

by GregP_WN

"Bug" is our WhatNexter of The Week. She shares her story of beating a breast cancer diagnosis, going on to enjoy life, and giving back through volunteering to help others through their own diagnosis. Take a look below, and drop by her page and thank her for sharing.  

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Bug on Halloween at Treatment

Leading up to my 50th birthday, several friends told me how I’d love my 50s. They said they felt more comfortable in their own skin in their 50s, freer to be themselves, life settled down...

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"Beachbum5817" Reaching Milestones in Her Life Once Thought Unobtainable

by GregP_WN

Our WhatNexter of the Week is "Beachbum5817", a breast cancer survivor who has, as of this writing,  passed the five year mark by seven months. She shares her story of finding a lump through surgery, treatments, doubts, pain, lows, and highs, and through to being a five year survivor. This is her story.

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Above: Beachbum5817 and her Daughter celebrating after her last radiation treatment

I had my yearly mammogram in Sept. 2013, and I received a card in the mail saying that everything...

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WhatNexter of The Week - "Carool" A 20 Year Breast Cancer Survivor

by GregP_WN

Our WhatNexter of the Week is "Carool" she is a 20 year breast cancer survivor and a regular contributor to WhatNext. The following is her own cancer story in her own words. 

I’m Carool. I was born and remain in Brooklyn, NY. I was diagnosed with breast cancer on May 5, 1999. 

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Above: Carool at the opening of the Monmouth Museum Group Show


I found a lump in the upper part of my left breast in January of 1999, when I was 51. At first I thought it was nothing - and I’m someone...

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Receiving Bad News Over The Phone

by Jane Ashley

A disturbing new trend is emerging in the diagnosis of cancer. More patients (60 percent, in fact, of breast cancer patients) receive their diagnosis of cancer over the phone. It seems that some patients would prefer to learn the results of their tests as quickly as possible, even it’s via a phone call. Perhaps younger patients who use “phone and text” as their primary means of communications don’t want to wait for an appointment — they want to know ASAP.

60 Percent

But is this the best method to...

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Cancer Steals a Smile, Ray of Sunshine, and Life

by GregP_WN

Last Tuesday, cancer stole another life. This one wasn't just another cancer patient, this one was a dear family member of ours. She was one of the sweetest people that could be found on earth. She was a beautiful young woman, mother to two great sons, wife to a fantastic husband, who will be missed dearly by all of her family and friends.

Adrienne Wonder Warrior Shirt

We see new cancer diagnoses almost every week. All of us know of someone who has been diagnosed, either themselves, someone in their family, a friend or...

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Amazing Things: Sandy Kyrkostas - Victory Over Stage IV Colon Cancer

by GregP_WN

Originally Posted on Health Matters, Stories of Science, Care, and Wellness by New York Presbyterian

When this TV and film producer was diagnosed at 47 with aggressive colon cancer, doctors gave him little hope – until he met Dr. Manish Shah.

Sandy And Michelle Kyrkostas

Sandy Kyrkostas isn’t the kind of guy who lets life’s little challenges get in his way.

So in late 2013, when he noticed he was having diarrhea, coughing a bit, and occasionally feeling dizzy, he went to the drugstore to get some meds. He also made an...

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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

by Jane Ashley

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

One In23

Colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer, after lung and breast cancer (excluding skin cancer). Approximately 140,000 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the past year — 97,220 new cases of colon cancer (49,690 men and 47,530 women) and 43,030 new cases of rectal cancer (25,920 men and 17,110 women). Ninety percent (90%) of all colorectal cancer occurs in people over 50. Colorectal cancer accounts for just over 50,000 deaths...

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What is The Difference Between Terminal and Incurable Cancer?

by Jane Ashley

Recently diagnosed patients with Stage IV cancer are sometimes told that they have “incurable” cancer. Stage IV cancer means that the cancer has spread to distant parts of their body.

Incurable Is Not Terminal

But there is a fine line between “incurable” and “terminal.” Every living creature who is born will eventually die. And that is true for humans too.

Many patients believe that they are “terminal” – often thought of as having less than 6 to 12 months to live. These patients ask, “How long am I going to live?”

...

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