Posts tagged “Survivorship”

Why Cancer Isn't Over When You Ring The Bell

by Jane Ashley

Most cancer patients expect that when they complete their cancer treatment, they’ll pick up where they left off with their lives. They think that it will be kind of like the SERVPRO slogan — Like it never even happened.

Sail Towards The Sun

We believe (or want to believe) that the time spent in cancer treatment was just a bad dream, and that once treatment has ended, we are done — finished — cured — never going back to those days again.

Are our expectations realistic?

Many cancer survivors are surprised when...

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Can Life After Cancer Include Dating?

by Jane Ashley

Can life after cancer include dating?

Dating After Cancer

Of course it can — life after cancer should include living life to its fullest, including the development of deep and enduring relationships. Dating after cancer can be more complicated because you may have physical scars, long term medical issues and physical/sexual issues. But no one is perfect. Other people have health problems too.

What kinds of cancer survivors might be interested in dating again?

Well, almost any cancer survivor could potentially...

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Adding Life to Your Years

by Jane Ashley

You’ve just finished your last chemotherapy session, or you’ve just had your last radiation treatment. Or your pathology report from your surgery showed clean margins, no residual tumor and no positive lymph nodes – so you won’t be needing adjuvant (mop-up) chemotherapy.
They tell you, “We’ll see you in three months.”

Sunset

“WOW,” you think. You’re happy and relieved. You look forward to getting back to normal.
And then that little devil named “DOUBT and FEAR” whispers in your ear, “Yes, but what...

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Emotions You May Experience After Treatment Ends

by Jane Ashley

Most of us expect to feel jubilant and overjoyed when our treatment ends. But many of us find that it’s not that easy to transition back into “normal” life. People who haven’t experienced cancer firsthand, either as a patient or caregiver, don’t realize that just because we’re not taking medications does not mean that our cancer care is over.

Feeling Lonely

Cancer survivors have a “new normal.” We are cautiously optimistic while acknowledging our fear of recurrence. Our values may change – we may isolate...

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You've Finished Cancer Treatments, What's Next?

by Jane Ashley

WhatNexter CindiT85 ringing the bell after finishing treatments.

Cindit85 Ringing Bell

It’s the day that you’ve looked forward to since you first learned that you had cancer. You counted down the radiation sessions. You marked off the weeks between chemotherapy sessions. You waited the allotted time, after chemo or radiation, until you could have surgery. You waited for genetic results. You waited for the pathology report. You waited to finish adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation. You marked every event in your...

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Persevering and Overcoming - A Story of a 30-Year Cancer Fight

by Glen Kirkpatrick

My life with my wife Debbie, and our three-year-old son Russell was wonderful before cancer. Our memory building times together included family dinners, the days we spent swimming in our pool, taking trips to the San Diego Zoo, and enjoying extended vacations. Leading up to my first cancer diagnosis I was serving as a police officer with the City of Manhattan Beach, California. My wife was working in the animal healthcare field.

Our Wedding Photo

I STOOD OUTSIDE IN THE POURING RAIN. As the water washed over...

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Hitting Pause: Creating Your Own Battle Plan Against Cancer

by Jackie Edwards

Guest Blog Post by Jackie Edwards

According to the United States government, over 14 million United States citizens have some form of cancer. Rather than giving in to the depression that comes with a cancer diagnosis, many cancer patients are beginning to empower themselves with control over treatment options. These people find it easier to accept mainstream medicine and help themselves living healthier lives during treatment.

Hitting Pause Creating Your Own Battle Plan Against Cancer

The Diagnosis is Cancer

Initially, after the diagnosis, the shock...

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Moving Into Survivorship After Cancer

by GregP_WN - HelenJ

There's something about survivorship that leaves you wondering about what's next. Should you just move on with your life? Do you need to take different steps to stay healthy? You may feel a sense of confusion and loss after a doctor tells you that you are cancer free or ready to move past treatment. The challenge is moving into survivorship and taking the next steps to enjoy your life.

Hello I Am A Survivor

Getting Support

We've all gone through a transitional period with our emotions after cancer. When my mother...

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Cancer's Effect on the Concept of Time

by GregP_WN

You have probably experienced this before throughout your cancer journey, you look at the clock and it says 1:05, then after what seems like 30 minutes, it's only 1:09. Cancer and the anxiety we have when trying to navigate through everything has an effect on our concept of time. It seems to happen in both directions too, it will speed time up or slow it down, depending on the situation.

Be On Time

My Father was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer at the age of 71. I remember sitting with him in the exam...

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10 Signs You're Fighting Cancer Better than You Think

by Brittany McNabb

If you're worried about having a week where you feel the doom and gloom of cancer, treatment, side effects, or fatigue, we are here to tell you that you are already fighting cancer better than you think. Fighting cancer is a full-time job and sometimes WhatNexters are too hard on themselves. Here are 10 signs you are fighting cancer better than you think. 

10 Signs You're Fighting Cancer Better Than You Think

1. You have reached out to other people with cancer.

Even the small step of joining the WhatNext community shows that you are...

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