Cancer Treatments, Insights and Other Musings -

Coping With Fatigue After Cancer Treatments

by Jane Ashley

Everyone seems to realize that fatigue is a part of cancer treatment, but most of us assume that fatigue will go away soon after treatment. We hope and expect that we’ll get back to “normal” and that life will be just like it was before.

Yoga For Fatigue

But for many of us, the fatigue just doesn’t go away. Fatigue lingers, sometimes for years after treatment. For most of us, it gradually gets better … but we’re just never quite the same. We don’t have the stamina we once had.

Don’t feel guilty — it’s real....

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Understanding the Difference Between Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

by Jane Ashley

Patients, family members, and friends may have a difficult time understanding the differences between Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. To understand the differences between the two diseases, perhaps we should first begin by learning a little about lymphoma.

Sir Thomas Hodgkin

What is Lymphoma?

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system of our bodies — our lymph nodes, bone marrow, tonsils, adenoids, spleen and thymus gland. Lymphoma can affect any of these parts of our...

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Measles Outbreak An Unseen Risk for Some Cancer Patients

by Jane Ashley

You may be wondering why we are talking about measles and cancer. But the recent measles outbreak reminds us that measles is a potentially dangerous disease was thought to have been eliminated in the United States.

Highly Contagious

History of the Measles Vaccine

Measles was first identified in recorded history in the 9th century by a Persian doctor. In 1757, a Scottish doctor (Francis Home) discovered measles was an infectious disease carried in the blood of patients.

In 1912, measles officially became a...

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Important Facts About Esophageal Cancer

by Jane Ashley

April is the month that we highlight esophageal cancer, one of the faster increasing cancer diagnoses in the Western world, increasing 600 percent in the last 35 years. Most of us hear about breast, colorectal and lung cancers, but every adult needs to be aware of the risk factors and early symptoms of esophageal cancer.

Esophagus

What is the Esophagus?

The esophagus is the narrow, muscular tube that connects our mouth to our stomach. The muscular walls of our esophagus push food from our mouth and...

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April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

by GregP_WN WhatNext Editorial Team

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month. Testicular cancer is an uncommon cancer. About 1 in every 250 men will be diagnosed with testicular cancer. In the U.S., about 9, 560 men will be diagnosed with this cancer in 2019. About 400 men die annually of advanced testicular cancer.

Testicular Cancer Info Graphic

Every hour of every day of the year, a man hears the words – “You have testicular cancer.”

Testicular cancer is a younger man's disease, occurring mostly in men ages 15-34. It is most common in Caucasian men....

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Chemo and Radiation's Effect on Your Eyes

by Jane Ashley

When we think of chemotherapy side effects, we think about nausea, fatigue and low blood counts. But did you know that some chemotherapy drugs and other cancer treatments may affect your eyes? From tearing to dry eyes to sensitivity to light, be sure to tell your oncologist about any changes to your eyes.

Eye Symptoms

How Can Chemotherapy Affect Our Eyes?

Chemotherapy and the steroids that help prevent side effects can cause eye problems.

• Cataracts. When the lens of your eye become cloudy, the cloudy...

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April is Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer Awareness Month

by Jane Ashley

April 7-14, 2019 is Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week. Head and Neck cancer includes a family of cancers that occur in the larynx, mouth, nose, sinuses and throat. Many of the particular locations are uncommon locations for cancer to occur, but when this group of cancers that occur in the oral, head and neck are combined, over 65,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed annually.

Head And Neck Cancer Logo

Statistics and Types of Head and Neck Cancer

Head and neck cancer is more prevalent among men. Of the 65,000...

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Cancer of Unknown Primary - What is it?

by Jane Ashley

Imagine finding out that you have cancer, but the medical team doesn’t know where the cancer began.

What Is Cup

How is Cancer of Unknown Primary (CUP) Discovered?

It depends on the circumstances. Sometimes, CUP is accidentally found during surgery for something else or through a scan given for another reason.

A nodule might show in a CT scan of the lung when trying to determine if a patient has pneumonia.

• A person might fall and hit their head requiring stitches at the ER — the ER physician orders...

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Can Life After Cancer Include Dating?

by Jane Ashley

Can life after cancer include dating?

Dating After Cancer

Of course it can — life after cancer should include living life to its fullest, including the development of deep and enduring relationships. Dating after cancer can be more complicated because you may have physical scars, long term medical issues and physical/sexual issues. But no one is perfect. Other people have health problems too.

What kinds of cancer survivors might be interested in dating again?

Well, almost any cancer survivor could potentially...

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March is Kidney Cancer Awareness Month

by Jane Ashley

March is Kidney Cancer Awareness Month. 

Kidney Ribbon Logo

We have 2 kidneys. They filter our blood to remove impurities, excessive amounts of salt and other minerals and water. Our kidneys are amazing workhorses in our body — continuously filtering our blood (equivalent to about 200 quarts of blood daily) and producing 2 quarts of urine (waste products). Our kidneys also produce hormones that help regulate our blood pressure and red blood cell production.

Fortunately, our kidneys work independently of...

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