Cancer Treatments, Insights and Other Musings -

A Story of Surviving Stage IV Spindle Cell Sarcomatoid Carcinoma-6 Years

by GregP_WN

Our Guest Blog Post today is from  Nicki Goodwin, "NGoody16". She is a six year survivor of spindle cell sarcomatoid carcinoma. A rather rare form of soft tissue cancer. She describes her life before, during, and after her diagnosis. This is her inspiring story in her own words.

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Nicki with her husband, Jeremy, and son, Bryce on his first day of 1st grade(Sept 2017).

I was 34 years old in the fall of 2012. I was finally getting the hang of being a new mom and wife while juggling my...

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How to Get Back to Life After Treatment

by Jane Ashley

It’s the moment that we’ve waited for and dreamed of, our treatment is done. No more chemo or radiation — we’ve recovered from surgery. Our oncologist says to us, “We’ll see you in three months.” We go to check-out, expecting to feel elated, but it suddenly hits us that no one is going to checking on us for the next three months.

Live One Day At A Time (1)

You may experience an entirely different set of emotions than you expected. Instead of turning cartwheels of joy, you might feel “let-down” or “unsettled.” After...

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Nutrition During Chemo - What You Need to Know

by Jane Ashley

Nutrition during chemotherapy is a much debated topic — in chat rooms, in groups like WhatNext.com, on the internet — plus friends and coworkers giving us advice. Go vegan, sugar feeds cancer, don’t eat meat or drink veggie smoothies. It’s no wonder that patients are confused about what to eat during chemo.

5 Servomgs

What’s most important?

According to most experts, unintentional weight loss may lead to worse outcomes in patients. When we don’t eat properly, we become malnourished and lose weight.

In...

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Cancer Leaves a Mark - Coping With Disfigurements

by Jane Ashley

We don’t always think about the physical disfigurements that cancer may bring to us. Surgery is often the best option to achieve a cure or long remission or extended period of NED. As we have learned from each of our diagnoses, cancer does not pick convenient locations.

Head And Neck Cancer

Cancer can occur almost anywhere in our bodies. Cancer occurs in virtually inaccessible locations. Cancer occurs in organs essential to bodily functions. Cancer is an aggressive disease — getting rid of it can be...

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Share Your Own Cancer Story and Inspire Thousands!

by Jane Ashley

Do you want to help others diagnosed with the same kind of cancer that you had?

You Have A Story To Tell

Do you remember those dark days when you were first diagnosed? The fear, the confusion and the “what ifs” were overwhelming. If you are like me, you probably wondered if life would ever would be normal again. Over 1.7 million people in the United States were diagnosed with cancer in 2018 — that’s over 4,900 people every day here in the U.S. who hear the words, “You have cancer.”

Help others by sharing your...

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"Bug"-Her Story of Triumph Over Breast Cancer

by GregP_WN

"Bug" is our WhatNexter of The Week. She shares her story of beating a breast cancer diagnosis, going on to enjoy life, and giving back through volunteering to help others through their own diagnosis. Take a look below, and drop by her page and thank her for sharing.  

Nose For Wn

Bug on Halloween at Treatment

Leading up to my 50th birthday, several friends told me how I’d love my 50s. They said they felt more comfortable in their own skin in their 50s, freer to be themselves, life settled down...

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Traveling With Cancer

by Jane Ashley

Cancer doesn’t have to be a “bad” travel partner, but if you’re in active cancer treatment, traveling with cancer requires extra planning in the event of the “unexpected.” It’s probably best to postpone an overseas trip or a cruise until after your treatment is over — a medical emergency in these two situations could be catastrophic. A medical evacuation from overseas may cost well over $100,000.00.

Botanical Garden

Talk to your oncologist before planning a vacation. Before committing to a vacation, have...

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The ABC's of Cancer

by Jane Ashley

When we’re first diagnosed with cancer, we quickly learn that it’s a “whole new language” that we must learn to understand and speak. Many types and sub-types of cancer have long, complicated names that are impossible for patients to pronounce. The drugs that treat cancer have equally “impossible” names. Specialized surgical and interventional radiology procedures fall into the “can’t pronounce” category too. 

Ab Cs


An acronym is an abbreviation made up of the first letters of each word and...

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Summer Tips For Cancer Patients

by Jane Ashley

Ahh … summer. For many people, summer is our favorite season of the year. But if we’re in active treatment for cancer, there are some precautions that we need to take to ensure we enjoy summer safely.

Sun Protection

Wear light-weight clothing. Avoid polyester and other synthetic fibers. Wear light-weight cotton that breathes.

Avoid mid-day sun exposure. Some chemotherapy drugs cause sun sensitivity. Radiation treatments may make patients more prone to serious sunburn. Err on the side of caution and wear...

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Examining Support For Cancer Patients And Survivors In College

by Chloe Bennet

There’s never a good time in life to get diagnosed with cancer. That said, dealing with cancer during the formative and vital period of your education is a particularly harsh deal. Strangely enough, college aged cancer patients or survivors are actually spoken about much less than other cancer demographics. 

Examining Support For Cancer Patient Students2

Though cancer is perfectly capable of taking lives, no cancer fighter will be willing to compromise their life after cancer by letting their lives grind to a halt while they fight...

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