Snooks' Journey with Breast Cancer

Survivor: Breast Cancer

Patient Info: Finished active treatment more than 5 years ago, Diagnosed: about 11 years ago, Female, Age: 69

  1. 1
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    about 5 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    lumpectomy or mastectomy

    Decision Point

    As soon as my doctor diagnosed me with breast cancer, he gave me a stack of literature and told me to go home and think about it. What was there to think about; I wanted the tumor out and I wanted it done that day! However, I went home and discussed it with my husband and immediatey knew I wanted a mastectomy which was performed two days later. My only regret was not having the other breast removed at the same time, but had it removed one year later.

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  2. 2
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    about 5 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    Targeted therapy

    Drug or Chemo Therapy

    My doctor suggested a three-drug chemo mixture based on the fact that my breast cancer was small, but invasive. I was fully warned that the side effects would be horrific (and they were), but I was confident in my decision.

    Easy to Do: Agree
    Minimal Side Effects: Strongly Disagree
    Minimal Impact to Daily Life: Strongly Disagree
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  3. 3
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    about 5 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    Low white blood cell counts (neutropenia)

    Side Effects

    The side effects were numerous (weight loss, hair loss on my entire body, loss of appetite, chemo brain, 3 hospitalizations due to low white blood cell count, diarrhea, fever, etc). However, after my last chemo treatment (I had 6 treatments spread over 18 weeks) I had no residual side effects. When I started losing my hair I made an appointment with my stylist to shave my head. We waited until she closed for the day, locked the door, opened a bottle of champagne and laughed and cried while she shaved my head. It was an exhilirating experience!. My hair was always my best feature, and to lose it freed me. The next day my husband shaved his head in support and declared "look how much money we're going to save by not buying shampoo, conditioner, mousse and hair spray for the next six months". I tell cancer patients it is not the end of the world when you lose your hair - just think you don't have to shave your legs!!!!

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  4. 4
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    about 5 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    Lost loved one

    Loss

    Breast cancer taught me to be a more compassionate person. During my hospitalizations, I learned to be more compassionate towards my family, friemds, and nurses that were helping me to get well. I found a new appreciation for my husband and the care he gave me. My husband had this intense dislike for hospitals so he would drop me off for my chemo treatments and he would come back in a few hours. None of the staff at the hospital could understand this, but I respected his feelings. He hovered over me during the six months I was in treatment, and that love and care was what helped me to repay him when he took ill with leukemia and eventually died. Because of my cancer, I had a better understanding of what my husband was experiencing.

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  5. 5
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    Oh No

    This person has yet to add any details about this experience.

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  6. 6
    • Snooks
    • Experience with Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years ago
    Snooks' Avatar

    To only have a single mastectomy

    Decision Point

    The period between mastectomys (one year) was nerve racking and a lot of sleepless nights. To be honest I felt like a freak!

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