Surgery - GregP_WN

Procedure or Surgery Associated with Hodgkin Disease. Posted on July 26, 2012 View this journey (16 Experiences)

The second of the surgeries, this one was a radical neck disection. I had no idea what this was going to involve, this was one hard surgery to recover from. First, I had a bad experience while still in the hospital. The scab broke loose from my throat and I had a terrible bleeding episode the night before I was to come home, that kept me in the hospital another night. When I went home, I had to sleep in my chair since when I would lay down fluid would build up in my throat and start to choke me. After I started to get better from that, I slowly started to be able to eat thicker foods, but mostly soft and liquid foods. The nerves growing back were very painful for a few weeks. I wasn't able to swallow much, and choked a couple of times. My wife has had to learn the Hymlich manuever to be prepared if I do it again. Today, almost 4 years after that surgery, I still have lingering side effects, and trouble swallowing, and occasional pain, and stiffness from the scar tissue.

Went as Expected: Strongly Disagree
Minimal Recovery: Strongly Disagree
Minimal Side Effects: Strongly Disagree
Minimal Impact to Daily Life: Strongly Disagree
5 Comments
  • meyati's Avatar
    meyati

    I know about the choking. During one of my first rad sessions, a mucous plug broke from my nose and lodged in my throat. I remembered that I could hold my breath underwater, so I just held my breath.I was holding a plastic ring in my hands, and they told me not to let go or move my hands, so the only thing I could think of was sticking my foot up in the air and wave it for help. In May I spent 4 weeks with my right hand tied up in the air-I won't go into that-but I seldom moved from that reclining chair. It was my new home. Oh, it felt so good to finally lie down and sleep.

    almost 6 years ago
  • jimhaden's Avatar
    jimhaden

    I had a wonderful speech therapist who was able to get me swallowing and talking again after a tongue and radical neck surgery. but still have problems from day to day.

    about 5 years ago
  • meyati's Avatar
    meyati

    I have an idea of how painful the therapy was for you. Also what you're going through now. My daughter is a speech pathologist/therapist, and this therapy was difficult on her emotionally. She considered people like you and Greg to be heroes. Many clients refused to finish the therapy, or their families weren't invested in the healing process, and ordered the swallowing therapy to stop. She treated strokes, head injuries, and throat mouth cancer patients at the VA for several years. it is a hard row to hoe.

    about 5 years ago
  • jimhaden's Avatar
    jimhaden

    As far as i am concerned people like your daughter and my wife ( who was my caregiver) are the real heros and why I am alive today. Left on my own without my wife or my speech therapist i would have given up. Not only did they help me phsically but were there to cheer me on and help me mentaly as well. And it is very hard to watch what can happen to people going through this.

    about 5 years ago
  • meyati's Avatar
    meyati

    I'll tell her that. So many patients wimped out or their families didn't want them to have any type of pain. Several times, my daughter commented that they either were tired of hearing nagging and this was a method to stop that- or they wanted whomever not to be able to say anything. I commend you and your wife for your courage and stubbornness.

    about 5 years ago

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