Chemotherapy - Karenb1

Drug or Chemo Therapy Associated with Adenocarcinoma, Colorectal Cancer. Posted on August 27, 2020 View this journey (4 Experiences)

Today was day one of chemo. At the cancer center over 4 1/2 hours. Had labs followed by EKG, then iron infusion before chemo could begin. Not sure what we were expecting, but the nurses were great and the entire experience was so much Bette than we thought it would be. He came home with an infusion pump that he has to wear for 46 hrs. Having a hard time getting comfortable due to defibrillator on the left shoulder and port a Cath with infusion on the right shoulder. The center started off saying I would nit attend anymore chemo sessions with him due to vivid, even though the Dr. Said I could. That is until I asked if they were going to take care of his posting, because I take care for him. They quickly changed their minds, turns out, they don't want to handle that. The hospital had the same reaction when he had his abdominal aortic aneurysm stent surgery. I'm sure not all chemo sessions will be as good as this one, but we are grateful this one went so good.

Easy to Do: Agree
Minimal Side Effects: Agree
Minimal Impact to Daily Life: Neutral/NA
3 Comments
  • JaneA's Avatar
    JaneA

    They can give him a "fanny pack" for the pump to wear around his waist - that may or may not be more comfortable. I know that you are uncomfortable with the thought of not being with him during chemo. Don't worry about him. The chemo nurses are all awesome - they are responsive to their patients. All you have to do is hold up your hand or say HELP, and they will be right there. Even before the pandemic, my chemo center didn't allow anyone to stay with the patient for the entire time - but they were allowed to bring lunch or a snack or a quick visit. I'm glad that things went well. He'll be getting tired from the 5FU that's in the pump. The day of pump removal is usually the worse day in terms of fatigue.

    about 1 year ago
  • Karenb1's Avatar
    Karenb1

    JaneA - Is there anything to do to help combat the fatigue? They said for him to drink 4 - 16 oz. bottles of room temperature water a day. I think I'll number his bottles to keep him from cheating (he doesn't really care for any other drink that is room temperature). He is flushed now (no fever). I think it's probably due to the decadron they gave him yesterday.

    Due to where his ostomy is, he is unable to do the fanny pack. Also, they always allowed you to have a support person at his cancer center and once they realized he had the ostomy, they have gone from you can't come back except to bring him things TO you have to stay with him... Funny how that works when it's something they don't want to deal with. He does not do well alone with medical things (yes, he's spoiled).

    about 1 year ago
  • JaneA's Avatar
    JaneA

    Karenb1, there is nothing to combat the fatigue. Staying hydrated helps - keeps you from getting dizzy and helps clear the kidneys of the chemo. I hated the pump - when I was sitting on the sofa or at my desk, I always put it beside me instead of wearing it - I dropped it a couple of times when I'd get up and forget about it. The pump is tough and survived being dropped. I also slept with it kind of down beside my belly so the "sloosh" of the pump didn't disturb me.

    about 1 year ago

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