• CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Are night sweats a side effect of chemo or radiation?

    4 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I would ask your doctor. Sometimes the meds mess around with our hormones and cause things like night sweats, hot flashes and more. They may have something that can help. It really has to be bad in this summer heat.
      Do you have a ceiling fan? It might help to run it at night.

      5 days ago
    • CancerChicky's Avatar
      CancerChicky

      Thanks, I plan on bringing it up this week. I have a little fan I clamp to my nightstand that feels good, I just want to be sure this isn't a symptom of more things happening.

      4 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have night sweats, too. I know that is a question included on the questionnaire I have to answer every time I see the doctor. No one has ever commented about the fact that I mark it "yes" so apparently, at least in my case, it is nothing they are concerned about...

      (That might be because it isn't affecting THEM!!! Night sweats can be miserable!)

      4 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Which would you say makes you more tired and fatigued, radiation or chemo?

    5 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I had chemo first and I was so sick that they took me off early. We waited about a month so I could heal and then started radiation. Towards the last few weeks, I was taking 3-4 short maps and going to bed at 8 pm. So I will say radiation gave me more fatigue. But everyone is different.

      6 days ago
    • Kp2018's Avatar
      Kp2018

      For me, it's hard to say since my treatment consisted of 20 weeks of chemo, followed by a month's break, and then 4 weeks of hypofractionated radiation. Toward the end of radiation was when fatigue became evident. Since it was a long sequence of treatment, I think it's hard to determine if the fatigue was due solely to the radiation, or to the cumulative effects of both the chemo and radiation.

      I was pretty lucky relative to responding to treatment and experienced few side effects. My oncologist attributed my continuing energy to the fact that I am an avid exerciser, and never missed a walk (several mile a day) or an exercise class (cardio and yoga) throughout treatment. Toward the end, I have to admit that I was pretty much just going through the motions during cardio classes. It took about two months to begin to get my old energy back.

      5 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Radiation had a longer-term impact on my fatigue levels. It went on for a couple of years, really. Fatigue with chemo was more pronounced, but it only lasted a short while after each treatment.

      4 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Ever ask your doctor about something you looked up on Google?

    5 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I see those ads on TV every night. You might even call the 800 number and ask them if you are a candidate. I'm sure they will do everything to see if you are, since they get the biggest cut of that pie for including everyone. We hope you get some answers.

      11 days ago
    • MelindaN's Avatar
      MelindaN

      In order to qualify for any monies, you have to call within 2 years of getting the mesothelioma diagnosis. The lawyers ask alot of questions and do all the paperwork. They take the top 40% of any monies you get, plus any fees or expenses incurred, your insurance company will file a claim against you and the lawyer will give them 25%, so, you get the remainder of the payout. I can give you the name and number of the company I use if you are interested.

      10 days ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      I was trying to once without coming out directly and asking. My doctor looked at me and said well what did google say. I told him. He laughed and said well that’s wrong maybe you should google it again. We got a good laugh out of it.

      6 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    How many normal things about your life have you had to change due to cancer and treatments?

    6 answers
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      I answered a health questionaire in oncology last week while seeking referral for dietary evaluation and was told my current ‘real age’ is ten years older than my current age. It’s weird because while I do feel eighty, my brain thinks I’m thirty.

      25 days ago
    • NoLiver's Avatar
      NoLiver

      I have had to choose which conversations to join in on because there are times that if the topic is something that I can't recall what I want to say I look stupid. So often, I just don't talk. It's a sad, terrible side effect.

      25 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @KB2013, like you, in my mind, I am around 30 or 35. It always amazes me to look in the mirror and see an elderly woman staring back at me... For much of my cancer treatment, I maintained my pre-cancer activities, even if at a lesser pace than before. Over the last couple of years ... and the last year or so even more so, I've gotten lazy when it comes to exercise, etc. And, I can tell it in what and how much I'm able to do now.

      20 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    does anyone else get tired of seeing all the ads on TV from Lawyers looking for cancer cases?

    6 answers
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I get so fed up with these “ ambulance chasing “ like ads on television. Surgical mesh, baby powder, faulty stent, etc. There have been times when I have seen two or more of these ads during a 1/2 hour television program. Cigarette ads have been replaced by litigiousness ads for sure.

      22 days ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I used to work in Workers' Comp. Same idea. A small percentage of injured workers rook the system and make it hard for everyone else. And those invariably have had attorneys. Some of the WC attorneys were great, and it makes sense for a serious injury or if you don't trust your employer, but I dealt with some REAL shysters. All they are looking for is the cash. Liability law is similar in that aspect. Some good attorneys and some real shysters.

      22 days ago
    • LisaR's Avatar
      LisaR

      I have often wondered about those large class action lawsuits where each person winds up getting $9.95 in a gift card from somewhere, how much the law firm gets. I promise it's more than 10.00.

      22 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Someone asked me a question that I had to think about before answering.

    6 answers
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Yes, good days are good. I go out and work in my yard- goof around with my 3 coonhounds-I can cook without the heat making my face hurt for days-then hours-then it got better--I do woodwork-bake cakes-sleep with my hounds-go places with my family-drive my 5 on the floor mustang and truck-smile- laugh-eat and sleep. .

      about 1 month ago
    • Bonecrusher's Avatar
      Bonecrusher

      I would say more good than bad. But in the beginning, it was the other way around. I hope to sway more to the good side mostly as I get nearer to the end of treatments.

      about 1 month ago
    • Created07's Avatar
      Created07

      I see more good in my days than I did before cancer. What would have ruined my day before cancer really doesn't seem that important. And the wonderful things that I ignored before, are simply precious today.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Treatments are playing havoc on my digestive system?

  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Have you had a finger or fingers turn blue/purple and tingle after or during chemo?

    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      If you are taking a platinum-based chemo, tingling is a side effect. It's called peripheral neuropathy. My guess is that the discoloration of your fingers is related to neuropathy. Be sure to tell your oncologist.

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I haven't had the purple fingers/toes/or anything, but I do have burning in my feet after a long day. It's been over 30 years since I had chemo, but mine was harsh and fast back then without all of the pre-meds and anti this and that. Treatments have come a long way since then.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I have been told that chemo and radiation will affect all of our senses. Which of yours have been affected?

    • IKickedIt's Avatar
      IKickedIt

      Taste buds. My family couldn't believe they were watching me, the Queen Chocoholic, spitting out chocolate! It lasted throughout chemo, but resolved and now I am back to being the lover of anything once again! (and the weight came back on, darn it!)

      Eyes were never affected nor was my hearing, however, I suffered from severe bilateral vestibular dysfunction because of the platinum-based drug I was on (fried inner ear and affected balance). Platinum-based drugs can affect hearing, too.

      And yes, certain things smelled funky to me, but my family assured me it was only my sense of smell that was weird. And that also resolved for me soon after I finished chemo.

      2 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I am going next week to have my eyes checked to see if they have been impacted by my treatments. I have tinnitus pretty badly, but I can't remember if I had it before treatments or not. My taste buds are fine ... if anything, I started liking more varieties of foods and I think my sense of smell is as good as it ever was. I only have touches of neuropathy and that only comes occasionally so I'm going to say "feel" is okay, too.

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I lost taste in all of my three diagnoses, lost weight, I couldn't tell about sight or hearing. My smell seems to have been enhanced. That's about all I could tell.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    How many scans can our body take in a lifetime? When is it too many?

    7 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @andreacha, sometimes, my radiologists complain about the lack of dye, but I've seen the scans ... they look pretty clear to me... I went into shock from the dye one time - it worried them a lot ... so my files are marked and double marked ... no iodine dye!!!! (I had a MRI and I mentioned to them that I couldn't have dye. They told me theirs was different and wouldn't bother me. I was a little worried, but they were right. Thankfully, though, my kidneys are okay so far so we don't have the same concerns as you do!!!

      4 months ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      @LiveWithCaner how did you know you developed the allergy. I had a scan yesterday and had the dye. It went well and I always get that warm feeling but yesterday it felt warmer and lasted a little longer. About the time I was going to say something it got better. So i didn’t but I wondered if you can develop a reaction after years of no reaction.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @SandiA, the first time I had an allergic reaction, I thought I was having a panic attack. I could barely breathe. I sat out front in the lobby for a few minutes and talked to myself about panicking. (I do not have anxiety attacks and had no reason to have an anxiety attack, but I never dreamed I was having an allergic reaction.) I didn't say anything to anyone and it got better after a bit of time.

      Too bad I didn't pay attention or know that what I was experiencing was a problem. The next scan, there was no hiding the fact that I was having symptoms. The moment they unhooked me, I had a terrible taste in my mouth (more so than normal), was so dizzy I could barely walk, and was very, very nauseous. I could also not catch my breath. I sat down for a few minutes again in the lobby, trying to get control of myself (STILL thinking I had some kind of emotional issue going on).

      Someone came in while I was trying to get my breathing right, talking about drinking banana barium. That sent me running to the bathroom, where I threw up multiple times. A doctor came into the bathroom while I was there and was really worried. I told her I was on my way up to the chemo lab to get my port de-accessed. She'd already alerted them that I was coming before I managed to get there.

      Fortunately, we had taken my blood pressure and oxygen and stuff when they accessed my port so we knew what was normal ... and everything had gone bonkers. I can't remember if it went high or low (or both) ... but nothing was normal. They went into emergency mode, got me some benadryl and I had to sit there for several hours while they hydrated me, gave me intravenous drugs and watched me like a hawk! Naturally, I had gone for my scan alone so had no one to drive me home. They really wanted me to get my husband to come get me, but I'm so hardheaded that I drove myself home when they finally deemed I was stable enough to be let go.

      I have never, ever had an allergic reaction. This one literally nearly killed me. I had been getting the iodine every 6 weeks for years with no problems. There is something they can give you if you have a reaction, but my doctor just has orders to not give me iodine dye. The radiologist can just suck it up and read the scan without it rather than put me in harm's way again...

      Soooooooooooooooo.... with all of that said ... do you have the results of your scan yet? I know there's been some worry and I'm hoping that is resolving itself in a way that says there is no more worry!

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Has anyone had blood clots in their legs after or during treatments?

    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I had one leg that got really swollen. My oncologist was concerned it was blood clots so sent me for tests. In my case, there was no apparent reason for the swelling.

      I personally would send a note or make a phone call to my oncologist's office. Blood clots are not something to mess around with.

      4 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      An ultrasound can quickly identify or eliminate a thrombus as the cause. Make that call.

      4 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      My Dad lived with blood clots for years. He would usually complain of pains in different spots on his legs. That's usually where the clot was.

      4 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Do you stay at home more now? Did your diagnosis cause you to not want to be out in large crowds?

    8 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      During treatments I was told to stay out of crowds. It was winter and flu season. It was a long winter.

      6 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      During my chemo treatments over 30 years ago, I looked terrible. I lost so much weight I looked like a malnourished person from a third world country. People actually took a step back from me before like they were afraid they would "catch it". On the flip side, I was worried too much about others, but my doctors did tell me to stay clear of others that were sick. At the time, that seemed strange, me being as sick as I was and told to stay away from "sick people".

      5 months ago
    • Caddo's Avatar
      Caddo

      Yes I don't feel comfortable in crowds besides Dr said stay out of crowds avoid flu

      5 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Have any of you had any "ambulance chaser" attorneys call you about your cancer diagnosis?

    4 answers
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I don't have FB, Instagram or any social media exposure. I hide behind my username on the web, so ambitious attorneys will find it very difficult to locate me. I live in great hiking territory, and that is exactly what I would tell them to do.

      6 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      My lung cancer (adenocarcinoma) is too common - no one has called me. I do see ads all of the time for mesothelioma so am not horribly surprised that you have been called. My first question, though, is how they know your diagnosis. Where's HIPPA?

      6 months ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      LWC -- Believe me, HIPAA can be breached. Should NEVER be, but it can be.

      6 months ago