• CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Chemo is giving me the sweats at night.

    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      I don't use a chilly towel, but I do use a damp washcloth and a fan. That seems to help a bit with the unending sweats.

      about 17 hours ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Do you frequently have people tell you that you've already told them that?

    5 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I do that - can't remember who I told what. But, some of my friends who have never had cancer repeat themselves too.

      25 days ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      I have the “can’t always remember a movie or book that I saw/read a month ago” situation that Greg mentions. However, I chalk it up to being 71.

      25 days ago
    • CancerChicky's Avatar
      CancerChicky

      Thanks to you all, I'm glad to know I'm not the only one.

      about 17 hours ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I'm still having trouble with this bad taste in my mouth. It seems like sour candy, mouth wash or nothing is helping.

    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Is it a metallic taste?

      23 days ago
    • dollymama's Avatar
      dollymama

      I have tried hard and sour candies to suck on, spraying mouth sanitizer in my mouth before eating, and a few other things. For me, sometimes it's that metallic taste and other times it's just a bad taste.

      22 days ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      If it is metallic try Metaquil. Best of luck to you.

      22 days ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Who has had a Peg tube? Isn't it supposed to be different from a feeding tube down the throat?

    5 answers
    • BobbyZ's Avatar
      BobbyZ

      I've not had one, but it has been talked about as a possible thing if I lose too much weight.

      about 1 month ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I had a peg tube for 7 weeks after my surgery. It didn't bother me in any way. However, make sure that the tube is collapsible which would mean a painless extraction. I was in a huge Atlanta hospital in 2006 when collapsible tubes were on the market. Prior to leaving rehab a Dr. came to remove it. He looked at it and he immediately warned me that it was not collapsible and would be extremely painful to remove . It took my breath away. I'd rather have 10 children than to have that done again. Hope this helps.

      about 1 month ago
    • robynr's Avatar
      robynr

      I have one in my stomach now. It can get a little sore if you are real active other than that no problems. I use a 4 inch ace wrap around me to hold it so it don't dangle. I really think they could of left it shorter. When it hurt badly to swallow it was really wonderful.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I just watched on the news that Alex Trebeck is done with chemo treatments for pancreatic cancer.

    10 answers
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      I am truly amazed at Alex!! Pancreatic cancer is generally very advanced by the time you have symptoms and the treatment is usually grueling!! He is a Superhero!! I sure hope he beats this!! I’ve been a Jeopardy Fan since the Art Fleming and Don Pardo days but really love Alex!! So, so smart!!

      about 1 month ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      Just saw breaking news that Alex Trebeck has had a setback and is starting another round of chemo. His interview was remarkably honest and full of grace. Hoping for a good outcome for him!!

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      That's too bad. I always hope for a positive outcome and was happy to see his initial success. But, with our experience with cancer of all types, we know that his story was exceptional.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Are you happy with your doctors and your treatment plan or are you just accepting it due to lack of resources.....

    5 answers
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Those of us who live in rural area face special challenges. I live in rural GA, but my medical team provided me care exactly to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for my Stage IV rectal cancer. Those are the same guidelines that the urban cancer centers follow.

      Here's the link to a free download to treatment guidelines. https://www.nccn.org/patients/guidelines/cancers.aspx

      Trust is such an important part of our treatment. But our connection with our doctor is also important. Perhaps you could get a second opinion from a larger hospital and like, Mariam said, they could work with your local doctor. Best wishes. Cancer is more difficult in rural KS or rural GA.

      about 1 month ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I do live in a rural area with a small oncology care center attached to the local hospital. They have connections to a big regional medical center hours away but we basically have two medical oncologist, one specializing in breast cancer, one a hemotologist, then the one radiology oncologist. Not many choices unless one wants to travel many miles. We seem to have a big turnover with doctors. You just get comfortable with the person and they're gone and you have to start over with a complete stranger. Continuity of treatment is so important to a patient 's well-being. I start with a brand new person this month so will see how it goes. I like the convenience of being treated locally but sometimes question the quality of care.

      about 1 month ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I've always said, ya gotta click w/your doctor. Going in to my first appt w/the gynecological surgical oncologist, I sat in the waiting room, fretting because I should have been seeing a doctor at the big cancer center in town. I calmed myself down, saying that's why they made 2nd opinions. Then I met my surgeon. Little ol' guy reached across the desk, shook my hand and said, "It's nice to meet you. I'm sorry you're here." Click! I didn't find out he was the head of oncology until after surgery. Didn't care. I stayed w/him until he retired about 4 years ago. Left off w/that practice following me with his replacement because I didn't need a 16 yr old who had met me twice looking down at me, with her size 2 bod, telling me I needed bariatric surgery. Missie, you don't know me. You've spent maybe 15 minutes with me. How do you know that I'm psychologically fit to go there? I don't think I am. I was done with that practice. I still have my medical oncologist (the chemo guy) following me 7 yrs later.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Who has experience with a feeding tube?

    • BugsBunny's Avatar
      BugsBunny

      I haven't personally, but my dad had one for months with no issues.

      about 1 month ago
    • NeckCancer's Avatar
      NeckCancer

      If the radiation keeps building up the side effects on me it's a good possibility that I will have one. So far so good though, even though it hurts like XXX to swallow.

      about 1 month ago
    • robynr's Avatar
      robynr

      the tube I got went straight to my stomach. it was most likely the best thing that could of happened. I wasa able to maintain weight which I believe kept me feeling better than if I wouldn't of gotten it. Now treatment over and getting back to eating its kind of annoying and I believe I depended on it for too long just because it was easier.

      about 1 month ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I have always been an extremely positive person and when it came time to fight cancer it was no different.

    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      I have some negative people on FB too. They have been really good friends in the past, but they are negative about everything. Instead of unfriending him on FB, Unfollow them - you do that by going to their profile page - on the lower right side of their cover picture, there is a button that says FOLLOW - click on the little arrow beside "follow" and select unfollow.

      You won't see their posts and be exposed to their negativity. But they don't know that you have unfollowed them,

      I've done this with several people who are negative, hateful or political. And now my FB feed is just filled with positive friends. Your friend who lost his wife to cancer is going through a rough period in his life right now; in a year or two, he may come to terms with her death and be fine again.

      2 months ago
    • Boogerman's Avatar
      Boogerman

      I have no time for people like that. I have just stopped associating with anyone that isn't on board with me. I'm not listening to anyone's crazy aunt Martha's sure-fire cancer killer, and I'm not going to go see any doctor that you think I should, so just STOP! I have found that my life runs so much smoother now since I've done a little friend purging, both on FB and in real life.

      2 months ago
    • IKickedIt's Avatar
      IKickedIt

      I distanced myself. I had one friend who was very sweet and called to check in on me, but the conversation always turned tow her cancer journey (which was difficult, but she has been cancer-free for many years) and her divorce which was more than 20 years earlier. She is just a person who needs to wallow in self-pity and complain that her situation was always worse than any one else's.

      I would let my answering machine pick up when she called, then I'd send her an email thanking her for her concern, and I'd give her a quick update. I had to keep her at a distance. When I was going through my cancer journey, I needed to stay focused on not only my physical health, but my emotional health, too, and I wouldn't let anyone drag me down.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Has cancer changed your personality?

    8 answers
    • aeasghMX's Avatar
      aeasghMX

      I can say that I have a newfound appreciation for my family also. Getting up close and personal with cancer and possible death makes you stop and take a look at your life and how you would like to live it. Eliminating what's not important and concentrating on the important things.

      3 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      I think cancer didn’t change my core personality. However, reaching early old age (71) is what has made me somewhat less anxious about getting another primary cancer or a recurrence of my previous cancer. Somewhat less anxious, but still anxious. Other bad life events (being laid off, very harshly, from a part-time job of 17 years; the state of our country now, etc.) have aggravated my tendency to react angrily when upset. Still, I see the good in people and am eager to show kindness to those around me, even strangers - and since I live in NYC, I’m always around lots of strangers.

      3 months ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I get angry about my situation in general. And to be perfectly honest, I have no right to feel this way after listening to others that have been through so much more than me. I am no longer independent. I no longer have a car and even if someone had given me one I wouldn't have the money to insure it. But being able to go wherever when I wanted was so valuable to me. Now I depend upon a Senior shuttle from Monday - Friday. They have taken a contract in a neighboring County so that drastically cuts back on hours for us to take care of our business. My local doctors' appointments have to be between 9:45 and 10:15. You try telling that to the person booking your appointment and see how it goes. I have to be done by11 because that's the time they take the seniors home after lunch at the senior center. Nowadays it takes you an hour and a half to get out of the doctor's office. That is totally unrealistic. If I go to Walmart I'm told: "I'll be back in 45 minutes to pick you up". Heck, it can take 20 just to find an electric cart! I never get to complete my shopping list
      I've gotten to the point that I can't keep up with my housekeeping in my home. I get so upset with myself because I can't do it. I am so tired all the time. I'd be ashamed to have an old friend come and visit. They know how fastidious I was. And it's not just the Cancer. It's a mix of other health problems. It takes me an hour to change my bed! I could never be a hotel maid and clean 16 rooms in a shift which is standard. I've got 2 bulging discs in my lower back and have had 2 spine fractures already so I try not to rush, and again, get angry at myself.
      My neighbor drives me to my out of town doctor's visits. He has a heart of gold but can be quite crude. He got thrown out of one of the offices already because of some language he used when talking to another person in the waiting room. He smokes (not with me in the car because I'm on oxygen) but I can still smell it on his clothes and the car itself. I had one doctor ask me if I was smoking again and had to explain about my driver. Again, this all boils down to lack of independence. Thankfully, I don't take my anger out on others. Everyone thinks I'm such a sweet old lady! If they only knew.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Migraine headaches since chemo - anyone?

    • HotRodTodd's Avatar
      HotRodTodd

      I have had very bad headaches, I'm not sure if they would be classified as migraine or not. I just no they are bad.

      2 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      Good question. You should tell your oncologist. They could be anything from a side effect of the chemo which will pass, to a totally different problem ( new tumor) present in your body.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Since the crack down on opioids started last year is your doctor still prescribing pain medicine?

    9 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I had serious stomach surgery and the hoops I had to jump through to get pain pills were nuts. And they can't just send a prescription electronically any more. They had to write it out and then my family has to drive to go get the paper to take to the drugstore. I understand the problems that these drugs cause but sometimes, we just need them.

      2 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      My palliative care doctors are pretty careful about prescribing pain meds and spend an hour of face to face time with their patients every month in order to determine what level of pain meds they do or do not currently need to address their pain or other symptoms.
      The doctors try very hard to prescribe what they think is right but end up spending a lot of time arguing with pharmacy benefits managers, having to submit entirely new care plans if they adjust a single medication.

      It's great to be safe and I'm glad we are trying to get better prescription control, but my docs tell me that they spend a lot unnecessary time arguing to get meds for people who really should be getting them more easily for obvious, ongoing cancer pain.

      It feels like the govt has tried to fix the problem of opioids but a lot of patients have been broadly painted with the wrong brush in the cancer community. My own mom can't get any pain meds at all and she really needs them.

      I don't know what the best solution is, but there it's still a lot of work to be done making sure cancer patients have adequate palliative care, but also that abusers of pain meds don't get too many.

      2 months ago
    • HotRodTodd's Avatar
      HotRodTodd

      I am still getting mine, but It's not a very large amount or dose and I never take all of them so I think they see that I'm not an addict from it.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Sorry if this is TMI, but I cannot get over constipation followed by diarrhea.

    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Prior to cancer, I'd be prone to diarrhea -- any change, it would come visit. With cancer, it became a balancing act between stool softner and Imodium. Luckily, it doesn't last forever. Good luck.

      3 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      If you're still having chemo, some of the anti-nausea medicines cause constipation. But then boom, the chemo causes diarrhea 2-to-4 days later. It's a cycle caused by the medicines - unfortunately, there's not too much you can do since you need the chemo. I was on chemo every other week - so I had one week of constipation followed by diarrhea and one :normal" week. Like Buckeye Shelby said, this won't last forever.

      3 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      For the constipation, take colace because you don't want to use a fiber laxative. For the loose stools, stay on the BRAT (bananas, rice applesauce,
      and toast) diet until the loose stools resolve. Best of luck to you.

      2 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I was visiting a friend in the hospital and noticed a flyer she had printed titled Advice From a Cancer Patient

    6 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      If I can muster a smile and a pleasant word, please try to reciprocate.
      I'm not a number, I'm a person. Please remember that.

      And, I love the one that @cllinda came up with -

      Please treat me like I was your mom or sister or best friend.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Love this!
      I might add, sorry if I'm in a bad mood, please I understand why that might be and what you say to me today night just turn that around..

      3 months ago
    • Jayne's Avatar
      Jayne

      I love all of these!

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    I am trying to fight off the effects of chemo and chemobrain

    7 answers
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I'd be afraid to take anything until my doctor approves it, which is unlikely. I have sooooo many smaller pads of paper with notes in each. The problem is I can't remember which one contains what I am looking for!!!

      3 months ago
    • Phoenix76's Avatar
      Phoenix76

      I haven't tried any supplements, but read a good book on chemo-brain (but I can't remember what it said...:-(...(LOL!)(just kidding!). The chemo breaks the synapses between the nerve cells in your brain, and so we have a hard time sometimes making a connection. However, the brain is a remarkable organ; there have been cases of brain damage to a certain area of the brain, and then other sectors "step up" and take over that function.

      What I found helpful was to first understand what was happening to my brain, and then to actively work to rebuild connections. When you learn something, new nerve pathways are created. So, I took Tai Chi classes (that were offered by the hospital for free to cancer patients), which forced me to focus intensely on mind-body connections, and even simple things like maintaining balance.

      Another was juggling! I can hear you chuckling about that...But, again, this was with soft juggling balls which helped to build mind-body hand-eye coordination, besides being fun. Be playful with it.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I have found puzzles; jigsaw, crossword, word search, sudoku can really help reteach your brain to focus. When I first tried a jigsaw I lasted about 2 minutes before I had to just get away from it because I thought my head was going to explode. I kept going back and now can sit and work a puzzle for a couple hours. Working arithmetic problems can help. Adult coloring books or drawing forces your brain to focus on something. I don't think supplements are the way to go. Work that brain. It will resist but if you keep at it I think you will notice improvement.

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Are night sweats a side effect of chemo or radiation?

    4 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I would ask your doctor. Sometimes the meds mess around with our hormones and cause things like night sweats, hot flashes and more. They may have something that can help. It really has to be bad in this summer heat.
      Do you have a ceiling fan? It might help to run it at night.

      3 months ago
    • CancerChicky's Avatar
      CancerChicky

      Thanks, I plan on bringing it up this week. I have a little fan I clamp to my nightstand that feels good, I just want to be sure this isn't a symptom of more things happening.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have night sweats, too. I know that is a question included on the questionnaire I have to answer every time I see the doctor. No one has ever commented about the fact that I mark it "yes" so apparently, at least in my case, it is nothing they are concerned about...

      (That might be because it isn't affecting THEM!!! Night sweats can be miserable!)

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Which would you say makes you more tired and fatigued, radiation or chemo?

    5 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I had chemo first and I was so sick that they took me off early. We waited about a month so I could heal and then started radiation. Towards the last few weeks, I was taking 3-4 short maps and going to bed at 8 pm. So I will say radiation gave me more fatigue. But everyone is different.

      3 months ago
    • Kp2018's Avatar
      Kp2018

      For me, it's hard to say since my treatment consisted of 20 weeks of chemo, followed by a month's break, and then 4 weeks of hypofractionated radiation. Toward the end of radiation was when fatigue became evident. Since it was a long sequence of treatment, I think it's hard to determine if the fatigue was due solely to the radiation, or to the cumulative effects of both the chemo and radiation.

      I was pretty lucky relative to responding to treatment and experienced few side effects. My oncologist attributed my continuing energy to the fact that I am an avid exerciser, and never missed a walk (several mile a day) or an exercise class (cardio and yoga) throughout treatment. Toward the end, I have to admit that I was pretty much just going through the motions during cardio classes. It took about two months to begin to get my old energy back.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Radiation had a longer-term impact on my fatigue levels. It went on for a couple of years, really. Fatigue with chemo was more pronounced, but it only lasted a short while after each treatment.

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Ever ask your doctor about something you looked up on Google?

    5 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I see those ads on TV every night. You might even call the 800 number and ask them if you are a candidate. I'm sure they will do everything to see if you are, since they get the biggest cut of that pie for including everyone. We hope you get some answers.

      4 months ago
    • MelindaN's Avatar
      MelindaN

      In order to qualify for any monies, you have to call within 2 years of getting the mesothelioma diagnosis. The lawyers ask alot of questions and do all the paperwork. They take the top 40% of any monies you get, plus any fees or expenses incurred, your insurance company will file a claim against you and the lawyer will give them 25%, so, you get the remainder of the payout. I can give you the name and number of the company I use if you are interested.

      4 months ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      I was trying to once without coming out directly and asking. My doctor looked at me and said well what did google say. I told him. He laughed and said well that’s wrong maybe you should google it again. We got a good laugh out of it.

      3 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    How many normal things about your life have you had to change due to cancer and treatments?

    6 answers
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      I answered a health questionaire in oncology last week while seeking referral for dietary evaluation and was told my current ‘real age’ is ten years older than my current age. It’s weird because while I do feel eighty, my brain thinks I’m thirty.

      4 months ago
    • NoLiver's Avatar
      NoLiver

      I have had to choose which conversations to join in on because there are times that if the topic is something that I can't recall what I want to say I look stupid. So often, I just don't talk. It's a sad, terrible side effect.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @KB2013, like you, in my mind, I am around 30 or 35. It always amazes me to look in the mirror and see an elderly woman staring back at me... For much of my cancer treatment, I maintained my pre-cancer activities, even if at a lesser pace than before. Over the last couple of years ... and the last year or so even more so, I've gotten lazy when it comes to exercise, etc. And, I can tell it in what and how much I'm able to do now.

      4 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    does anyone else get tired of seeing all the ads on TV from Lawyers looking for cancer cases?

    6 answers
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I get so fed up with these “ ambulance chasing “ like ads on television. Surgical mesh, baby powder, faulty stent, etc. There have been times when I have seen two or more of these ads during a 1/2 hour television program. Cigarette ads have been replaced by litigiousness ads for sure.

      4 months ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I used to work in Workers' Comp. Same idea. A small percentage of injured workers rook the system and make it hard for everyone else. And those invariably have had attorneys. Some of the WC attorneys were great, and it makes sense for a serious injury or if you don't trust your employer, but I dealt with some REAL shysters. All they are looking for is the cash. Liability law is similar in that aspect. Some good attorneys and some real shysters.

      4 months ago
    • LisaR's Avatar
      LisaR

      I have often wondered about those large class action lawsuits where each person winds up getting $9.95 in a gift card from somewhere, how much the law firm gets. I promise it's more than 10.00.

      4 months ago
  • CancerChicky's Avatar

    CancerChicky asked a questionMalignant Mesothelioma

    Someone asked me a question that I had to think about before answering.

    6 answers
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Yes, good days are good. I go out and work in my yard- goof around with my 3 coonhounds-I can cook without the heat making my face hurt for days-then hours-then it got better--I do woodwork-bake cakes-sleep with my hounds-go places with my family-drive my 5 on the floor mustang and truck-smile- laugh-eat and sleep. .

      4 months ago
    • Bonecrusher's Avatar
      Bonecrusher

      I would say more good than bad. But in the beginning, it was the other way around. I hope to sway more to the good side mostly as I get nearer to the end of treatments.

      4 months ago
    • Created07's Avatar
      Created07

      I see more good in my days than I did before cancer. What would have ruined my day before cancer really doesn't seem that important. And the wonderful things that I ignored before, are simply precious today.

      4 months ago