• Coopswifey's Avatar

    Coopswifey asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Mastectomy

    4 answers
    • Twinkletoes' Avatar
      Twinkletoes

      At first, yes. I felt I was not standing up straight, sort of hunched over. My back felt like it was trying to adjust to the different weight on either side. After I got a prosthesis it was corrected. No problem at all now, even when not wearing the falsie. It is not as horrible as you are probably thinking as long as you have absolute support from your significant other for your self esteem.

      about 1 month ago
    • Kris103's Avatar
      Kris103

      I've not noticed any balance problem due to the mastectomy. I've got some inner ear problems that occasionally affect my balance, but they're no worse than usual. What I have noticed when not wearing a prosthesis is how some tops pull towards the side with my remaining breast so that the clothes don't hang properly and make me look unbalanced. I generally find my prosthesis to be an annoyance, but it does fix the problem.

      about 1 month ago
    • mofields' Avatar
      mofields

      I had a single mastectomy (left side) five years ago. I had reconstruction done (not well) so I was able to get a prosthesis to wear. No physical balance problems, just balancing how the girl(s) look while adjusting the foobie (fake boobie).

      about 1 month ago
  • Coopswifey's Avatar

    Coopswifey asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Surgery

    9 answers
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      It is such good news that you have responded well to chemotherapy. I thought recovering from surgery was a piece of cake compared to going through chemo! Please do keep us posted on your progress.

      about 1 month ago
    • Bug's Avatar
      Bug

      So glad to hear that your tumors are smaller - that's great. Very best wishes on your surgery. Please let us know how you're doing when you feel up to it. Thinking of you and sending a big, warm hug.

      about 1 month ago
    • Ashera's Avatar
      Ashera

      I'm with MarcieB! After the most horrendous 6 months of dose-dense chemo - I insisted on taking 5 weeks to recover before I did surgery. I had a lumpectomy and complete axilla dissection, and the healing from that was 'a piece of cake' even with the drain. I'm so glad your tumors shrunk! You'll do fine with surgery - wishing for the best!

      about 1 month ago
  • Coopswifey's Avatar

    Coopswifey asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Mastectomy

    11 answers
    • Angelaine's Avatar
      Angelaine

      I had a mastectomy with reconstruction, and removal of all lymph nodes (as many as could be found on the affected side), I went through the surgery, and I did not get to go home next day. It is a surgery and there is a period of time that you are out. Have someone knowledgeable about medical things. Like no blood pressure or IV sides of surgery. What your allergies are. The surgery was good, but the aftercare was a lot of busy people. My plastic surgeion used a implanted pain med release over time. I think it was great! I did have some pain, mostly at night, but tried to use NSAIDs/Tylenol for pain rather than too many prescription drugs. I had drains, and use creative techniques to carry them. I did not have any help with drain carrying needs. I had never even known to expect them. If you have questions, ask. Sorry if this is too much, but I believe you need to have some idea of being proactive. I will keep you in my prayers. Blessings,

      3 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      Before my unilateral mastectomy, my surgeon said there would be very little pain since nerves are cut. You will get zings sometimes from nerves regenerating. The area will remain numb.
      Later that year I had a prophylactic mastectomy and DIEP flap reconstruction. Ask for training on drains, really no big deal. I had a vest and sweatshirt with big pockets that I used to carry them. Be sure to follow lifting directions and do your exercises. Watch your arm on that side. Report any swelling, tightness. Get informed about lymphedema. Many drs dont seem to be as aggressive as they should be about this.
      Wishing you all the best with surgery and treatment.

      3 months ago
    • suz55's Avatar
      suz55

      Lots of great suggestions and tips from everyone above! You might also want to move things in cabinets or shelves that may be difficult to reach for a few days. The exercises definitely help get the mobility back, but it can be frustrating not being able to reach the coffee cup in the morning. Also, button-up or zipper tops might be more comfortable for the first days. Best wishes!

      3 months ago
  • Coopswifey's Avatar

    Coopswifey asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Taking Doxorubicin

    13 answers
    • Coopswifey's Avatar
      Coopswifey

      Thank you KP2018. I’m so thankful for all of this helpful info. I’m dreading my last Doxorubicin treatment which is next Wednesday the 27th. But I will put on my big girl panties and suck it up. I know it is killing this awful cancer and making me better.

      5 months ago
    • Kp2018's Avatar
      Kp2018

      That's the spirit, Coopswifey! You've got what it takes. Just keep your eye on the prize - killing the cancer. My best to you on Wednesday and the weeks after. You're seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Coopswifey, if it isn't too late, try taking medicine before you get the chemo. The brochure with your prescription or your pharmacist will tell you how much before. Also ask your doctor if you can increase the dose. Best wishes.

      5 months ago
  • Coopswifey's Avatar

    Coopswifey asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Stage 3 Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma

    4 answers
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      IIIa here. Diagnosed 11 years ago next month. Bilateral mastectomy first (my choice). Be sure your surgeon understands your wishes if you choose to remain flat. Dose dense chemo followed. Adriamyin and Cytoxin - four sessions over the course of 8 weeks. Lost my hair after the first month. Needed Neulasta shots the day after each session to boost my white blood cell count. The last four chemo sessions were with taxotere. Lost some of my nails. Instead of Neulasta, had neupogen shots to boost my WBC count.

      I worked during chemo which began in May with time off in the summer because I was a teacher. After Labor Day I began 5 weeks of radiation. 5 days a week. I was religious about slathering Aquaphor gel on my radiated skin and did not burn badly.

      Somewhere in the midst of rads I succumbed to intense physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion. It took a lot to climb out of that hole and I needed a lot of help and support from famil, friends, friendly drugs, and therapists.

      I completed ten years of the hormone blocker Arimidex on Halloween. The Arimidex caused osteoporosis for which I take Prolia injections twice a year.

      I am here to enjoy retirement, 3 grandchildren, and many new adventures. Do everything in your power. It is worth it.

      6 months ago
    • Sparkplug's Avatar
      Sparkplug

      I have stage 3c. I had my left breast removed. Then chemo. Now I’m getting ready to start radiation treatments. I had 41 lymph nodes taken out and 26 had cancer in them. So I’ll be getting zapped all around that area. Chemo was not as bad as I thought it was going to be. The Dr prescriped anti nausea medication. So I only had a little nausea. After the chemo I had a neulasta shot. That causes joint pain, but I took a claritan and some how that eleveates the pain. I was able to drive myself through it all. I did sleep a lot through it. Well, I hope it goes eezy peezy for you. Take care and keep on fighting. You can do this if I can do it! I’ve been a big baby through it all! Any time you want to talk, let me know

      6 months ago
    • Coopswifey's Avatar
      Coopswifey

      Thank you.

      6 months ago