• JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Do you have a new side effect every day?

    7 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Live, for now, I cannot tell that I'm even having any treatment. The only issues I have were there before I started. Pain in my neck all around it, eliminating from the two tumors. And a little fatigue. That seems to be compounding. So some of that could be attributed to the treatments. I am shocked and happy about the results so far.

      Someone sent me an email yesterday that read my latest article. They said that their cancer journey mirrored mine including going back 30 years to the start and having hodgkin's disease that relapsed. Also, followed that with head and neck cancer that relapsed. They were told no more could be done and sent home to contact hospice. Then, somehow, they were put on Keytruda and within 6 months were NED.

      Now that's a big turn around! Inspiring stories, they keep me going!

      about 1 month ago
    • MyLungCancer's Avatar
      MyLungCancer

      I seem to notice something new not every day, but more like once a week I notice how something has changed. It might not be a direct side effect of my treatments but I find things that I'm not able to do any longer. I guess in a way, that's a side effect though.

      about 1 month ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      Funny that I should open this one. Since, I've been on Ibrance 75mg, I've not had a lot of side effects or they were so small, I didn't pay attention. This monthly treatment on 8/5 with my Faslodex & Zometa is terrible. I can barely walk after 4 days, hinny & legs are sore & numb. This is unusual as I'm on nearly full throttle by Saturday.

      6 days ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    I'm worried about not getting treatments!

    9 answers
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      Child of God, can you get Neulasta shot the day after chemo? Now they put a patch on your arm that gives you the meds the next day. I know your chemo has to be at least 14 days apart to get that med.

      5 months ago
    • Iyana's Avatar
      Iyana

      I think in this situation it is better to talk with your doctor. If you're worried about your treatment then it is better to discuss with your doctor maybe he can arrange an emergency appointment for you.
      Best of luck!

      5 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I know this is old, but this virus thing isn't going to end soon. I've learned to not worry about what I have no control over. Have faith that in all of this that our treatments will be met as needed. Yes, all of this is stressful. I hate that the people I usually see at my treatments have found new areas; I have to wait in the car until called; no one smiles anymore. I'm just grateful that I'm here & have treatments however they've changed.

      7 days ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    I'm having trouble staying focused on the positive things in my life

    8 answers
    • legaljen1969's Avatar
      legaljen1969

      First, you are still putting the cart before the horse. You are still assuming worst case scenario. I agree with the many who have suggested you speak to a counselor of some sort- whether that person is a psychiatrist, psychologist or a trusted spiritual leader. Having some outside perspective may help.

      I have the feeling that once you have a clearer path for your diagnosis and proposed treatment, you will feel much better about all of this. A plan of action provides me with a sense of security. There is so much more uncertainty because we are living in this COVID-19 world like the stinking zombie apocalypse. This too shall pass. I think this may be the craziest time anyone could ever get a cancer diagnosis. So much extra confusion with medical services by teleconference and delayed doctor’s appointments and gloves and masks on hyper use. Nothing in this time is normal. Fear is the way everything is presented to us.

      If you’ve already decided you’re going to die from this disease, you won’t fight and you won’t hear the positive things that could be told to you. You’re already processing through a “death” filter/lens.

      @po18guy has a great perspective on faith. My faith has helped me immensely in giving my fears over.

      This may sound ridiculously counterintuitive, but it is one action that actually helped me. If you don’t already have the documents in place, find someone to help you prepare a good Durable Power of Attorney and a simple Will. My POA covers everything from ability to handle financial affairs to medical treatment and end of life decisions. I don’t have separate documents for all of those things. My POA covers what some do
      Separately as a Healthcare/Medical POA and Living Will/Advance Directives.
      Knowing I had already made those decisions helped me know they were not decisions my family would have to make and wonder what I would have wanted them to do.
      My will sets out the basics and I have prepared a personal property addendum as to specific items and bequests.

      I also highly advise getting a journal. Whether you keep it or whether you write and burn the pages after you vent you’re your journal, either way it helps get the feelings out in the world where you can deal with them.

      3 months ago
    • savingrace's Avatar
      savingrace

      It really hard to look up when your looking down. Down is the negative thoughts that tend to take over. Up is the strength (positive) you have within that you have to pull out and work from. It is a daily task to keep your mind focused on the positive when you are going through such a negative thing as cancer, dealing with the virus, even pain. Talking to positive people/counselors is a great source of help. If you believe in the power of prayer, I'm a testimony that prayer will work. Wishing you all the best.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I fretted a bit when i was first diagnosed. My son was very much a mama's baby and he did not process pain well... My husband has been babied by me our entire marriage and we have discussed that it would probably be better if he dies first... My mom has lost two husbands to cancer already and is far more emotional than I am.

      I wasn't personally worried in the least about dying. I strongly believe that when i take my last breath here, i take my next breath in heaven and i don't dread that in the least. I made sure my family was aware that i wasn't afraid to die ... that i would be sorry to leave them ... but i would see them again.

      I put on a happy face and a positive attitude. I was the person who encouraged my family all through the process, instead of being encouraged by them. I talked to my husband about what i wanted when i died. And, i knew my son would be there for his dad ... together they would make it with me gone, even if that wasn't what they would prefer.

      You can let this disease steal your joy and rob you of today when you still have it ... or you can say, "No! I am alive today!! I will live today, this day that I do have."

      Believe it or not, you can train your mind to not dwell on sad or scary things. Start a "Grateful" jar and fill it up with things for which you are grateful: your home, a sunny day, a fresh cup of coffee, your family, a freshly mowed grass, beautiful flowers.... the list should be nearly endless. Dwell on THOSE things.

      Listen to happy music. Watch a fun movie or tv series. Read a book. Talk to friends or famiy(not about cancer or illness). Go for a walk. Pet a dog. Exercise. Garden. Paint. I used to sit on my patio with my camera and take 100s of pictures of birds, rocks, grass, flowers, weeds, the wind across the swimming pool, clouds in the sky, airplane flying by ...

      The last time I saw my oncologist, he said I was his superstar patient (he has many superstar patients). He went on to say that he would like to take credit for that, but couldn't. He credited the fact that i am still here on my faith and my attitude. (Stress and negativity are killers)

      3 months ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    So something strange is happening with some of my friends.

    15 answers
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      I didn’t have that experience because I reached out to my friends and family. I was a teacher and when my friends went back to work, I felt forgotten. I thought, well heck I have time so I’ll plan fun things to do with my family and friends. In the end, my cancer journey brought us much closer, but our friendships may have become distant had I not told them what I needed. It helped me get over being anxious and angry about my cancer to go get coffee, see a movie, or go on a hike. After awhile they started initiating get togethers. I think even close friends don’t really know how to support someone going through cancer in the long term.

      3 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      For anyone wanting to post about their experiences, blog, journal, or whatever you want to call it. All of that already exists right here. Your homepage has a section titled "Share An Update" When you post something there it is shared with everyone with your same diagnosis and with anyone who follows you. So if your friends/family are registered here and follow you the see all of your posts, if you want them to.

      3 months ago
    • CASSIEME1's Avatar
      CASSIEME1

      if people did half of the scarceness they do with cancer too the pandemic the world would do better , heal . where is the caring. today's world is all about me me me!!!!!!

      3 months ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Do you have a hematologist?

    14 answers
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      I don't have one--unlike many oncs, my MO is not a heme-onc. But she says I'm not anywhere anemic enough to need a hematologist. I didn't have chemo, so maybe that's a factor too.

      3 months ago
    • Bug's Avatar
      Bug

      My oncologist's specialty is hematology/medical oncology.

      3 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      Like some of you my oncologist is also a hematologist. I was going to the blood clinic for my Warfarin checks. The techs just couldn't get it right, so my oncologist took over. Everything is fine now & cardiologist is happy, too. They are in the same building. I also get my blood test for my PCP drawn at Cancer center. It saves me from going to another lab & it can be drawn from my port. I just have to stay on top of it to make sure DOs are in the system. It's a win-win for everyone.

      17 days ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Good news for metastatic breast cancer patients

    4 answers
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      This is really good news! I have two friends who could greatly benefit from this.

      3 months ago
    • TerriL's Avatar
      TerriL

      This is great news!

      3 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      Could it be that triple positive will be right behind? So far the Ibrance is working, but with a hormone blocker.

      20 days ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Knowing what you do now after having been through it all (or some of it) with cancer...

    16 answers
    • legaljen1969's Avatar
      legaljen1969

      Compared to most in this community, my journey has been so short-lived and relatively uneventful. I agree with hikerchick and bengal. Having breasts does not make you "more" of a woman. I have had a few people (not personally and bodily affected by cancer) ask me when I was going to have my reconstruction done. I told them I would have it done AFTER they had their own mastectomies done and started the journey of cancer and surgery.
      More than anything, I have learned to accept myself much more "just as I am." I have become much more assertive about my own body and my choices. I have learned that you have to be your own best advocate, but you also need to be willing to let people step in and help you when you need or just want help.
      I have learned that if you want to know about something, you need to ask. You cannot assume they will tell you everything you wonder about when your monkey brain takes over at night or in the middle of the day. Take a notebook with you to write down questions and the answers to those questions. Sometimes they will answer them for you just as an appointment is going on and sometimes you need to ASK.
      My doctor and my nurse navigator told me early on, everyone's journey with cancer is different. This is YOUR body and your cancer, not your neighbor's cancer. It may be worse for you or not as bad for you. So they tried not too feed me "too much" information.
      If you are not happy with the care you are getting, or the way you are being treated, you have the right- if not the responsibility- to ask for a second opinion. Know that doctors pretty much expect you to get extra opinions- especially with cancer.

      3 months ago
    • legaljen1969's Avatar
      legaljen1969

      @JustGrateful, when I said doctors pretty much expect you to get extra opinions- I don't mean they require it or that you MUST do it. I mean that they are not surprised when it happens. It seems to be pretty normal. I didn't end up doing it. There are some who think I was foolish not to get second opinions or check on clinical trials, but I was very comfortable with my team and I felt they were leading me down the right path.

      Another thing I "wish I had known" is that the doctors know you will have a lot of questions. They expect it. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't think you are "bothering" them with your questions. You are (or your insurance is) paying them for their "expertise" and to treat you. I don't know how long a "standard" appointment is, but if it is 15 minutes, you ask every question you can for those 15 minutes. If 30, ask questions and keep them there for the 30 minutes. Someone is paying for their time. Don't let them rush in and out. Cancer is a scary word. They know you are scared. They know you are apprehensive. They are the ones who are supposed to have the answers.

      Knowing what I know now, I am glad I didn't wait to make appointments for second opinions, only for my peace of mind. Those couple of extra weeks would have thrown me into scheduling surgery right at the beginning of the quarantines and shelter in place orders. It wouldn't have delayed my surgery by weeks, but most likely by a couple of months. I am not discouraging anyone to get a second opinion or to ask questions. I asked a LOT of questions. I hope you have a really great care team that is really compassionate.

      3 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I agree with everyone. I think the #1 item should be protecting your heart. Radiation damaged my heart, but because I had anxiety, NO doctor was looking for a-fib. I had to start passing out for a Dr. to believe me that something was amiss. Scarey!

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    I can already see that I am going to have a body covered with scars after this is all over.

    10 answers
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      This is the first I have heard of mederma. I use coca butter - straight, if you can get it. You will smell like a Hershey bar, but that can be kind of fun (!) It works for me.

      about 1 month ago
    • abflor13's Avatar
      abflor13

      I used target brand (up & up) scar cream on my double mastectomy scars. My oncologist says they healed nicely. I continued to keep them moisturized for a year by using deep moisturizing lotion. Best of luck.

      about 1 month ago
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      I have found that Mederma, BioOil and plain vitamin E oil all help--but you do have to massage the scars with them, not just apply them, because the massage helps to break down the scar tissue. Don't buy pricy bottles of Vit. E oil--drugstore-brand generic E capsules are just fine. XXX them with a pin and squeeze the oil out. (That was what my PT recommended after extensive surgery to repair a tibial plateau fracture sustained when a car hit me 24 yrs ago).

      As to Aquaphor, I applied it daily--right after each radiation session (in the changing room before getting dressed again), and at bedtime, sometimes with 100% pure aloe vera gel (Fruit of the Earth, sold at my cancer center's pharmacy) or calendula cream. But that was to soothe skin (and in my case, prevent pain & damage), not scarring.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    The overall public ignorance about everything to do with this coronavirus is just amazing to me

    37 answers
    • legaljen1969's Avatar
      legaljen1969

      @MarcieB, I hear you about the heat and estrogen inhibitors! The heat definitely sends me straight into "overheat." I got my prescription for Arimidex on March 14th and our county and state really started shutting down on March 16th, so I have had a perfect storm of hot flashes, COVID panic and spring/summer coastal heat. I live with a thermometer nearby in case I start feeling really hot. Starting the hot flashes at the same time the world started COVID has been an experience for sure. I hadn't thought about the medicine making the heat seem even less tolerable.

      about 1 month ago
    • fiddler's Avatar
      fiddler

      BTW, this question, and thread, has NOTHING TO DO WITH BREAST CANCER!

      about 1 month ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      No it doesn't Fiddler, but it DOES have to do with our medical safety and our concerns about those people who ignore the scientific community, and common sense.
      You know, those who bar-hop & play beach bunny bingo with no masks & certainly no "social distancing"-- Those type who bring the Virus home to mom or grandmom who just maybe is just getting over breast cancer.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Who is participating in clinical trials here? What did it take to get accepted?

    12 answers
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      I was given Keytruda in a clinical trial as it had not been approved yet for that stage cancer. After 2 treatments, it stomped the tumor where the second part of trial ( ugly open chest surgery) was cancelled. I have been offered clinical trials thru my doctors( oncologists and surgeons) and I have hunted them down. This battle against cancer has new avenues opening every day for us. Yes, it is hard not to get discouraged but every time I see a new approval fuels my fire!

      2 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @legaljen1969, when my tumors progressed on chemo and I was unwilling to go onto a less effective chemotherapy as 2nd round, my then-oncologist asked if I wanted to go into a trial instead. He referred me to a facility where trials were being conducted. That place did not seem to understand the urgency I felt, so I went to my PCP and asked if she could refer me to the NCI-designated cancer clinic in our area. That doctor had already looked at my history by the time I saw him for the first time and had the trial in mind that I was part of.

      When I stopped treatment and went on "active surveillance," I told him I would be happy to do that as long as he had a solution up his sleeve for if and when the tumors become active again. He is a researcher. He spends more time in the lab than seeing patients. He promised to have some solutions for me to consider when the time comes. It is most likely that what he'll suggest will be a trial or two. (When they find people who are willing to be "guinea pigs," they are very happy. MOST people choose not to participate in trials, but I am a huge proponent for them.)

      2 months ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      @legaljen1969, I did exactly what you did. I just went with all of the doctor's that my breast surgeon suggested. I never thought to get a second opinion or ask about clinical trials. If the opportunity to be part of a trial would arise, I would definitely do it. I learned that if it weren't for the participants of a trial for Herceptin, I would most likely not be here 5 years later. Thank you to all of you who have participated in clinical trials and helped to make a difference in treating cancer.

      2 months ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    I need Long-Term Hope! Tell me how many years you have been clear please.

    30 answers
    • happydyad's Avatar
      happydyad

      Lead. . . . . Not leave!!! See what I mean, the clippity clop is always there. Sheesh!

      4 months ago
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      I was diagnosed in Feb. 2015 with stage IIIc breast cancer and stage I thyroid cancer. I finished all treatments - 2 surgeries, 16 chemo infusions, 35 radiation treatments in March 2016. I have been NED since then.

      4 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I was cancer free for 10 years. No Dr. was looking for my MBC in my lung. I took my Arimmadex for 5 years. Now, 10 is suggested. I did my yearly examines & never gave it a second thought as I wasn't told that it could re-appear. To me it was a bump in the road.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Several Universities have announced that they will require students to have a flu shot and a covid 19 vaccination shot, if available.

    4 answers
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      Oh I remember that kind of thing when I was in college. My senior year was coming up, and a letter came to me stating I needed a measles shot if I wanted to be able to come back to school. I thought what I had as a baby took care of that; however, measles were running wild on college campuses all over the country, and my college wasn't taking any chances. So I went into a clinic and got the shot. HUGS and God bless.

      about 1 month ago
    • mwfd's Avatar
      mwfd

      My daughter is permanently brain damaged from a childhood vaccine. If she would have a severe reaction to the Covid vaccine, she could die. I've talked to her physician. The decision should be between the doctor and patient. The government is trying to fast track the Covid 19 vaccine and it scares me. Will it be safe? College students being forced into vaccination could have reactions worse than the disease. I hope that is not the case.

      about 1 month ago
    • JustGrateful's Avatar
      JustGrateful

      Oh that's terrible mwfd, I guess there are some things that we just don't know that will happen. I guess that's why they put a list of "possible" side effects on every drug bottle. They cover themselves. I agree there should be some discussion

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Are there that many people that are afraid of going through cancer treatments/

    7 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I watched my 48-year-old dad go from a healthy, vibrant man to a shell in 6 months. Much of that 6 months was absolutely terrible for him because he was undergoing chemotherapy and radiation during it. The radiation didn't bother him (that I knew of), but the chemo was horrid for him. Horrid. I said from the time I was 20 until I was diagnosed with the exact same cancer as killed him that I would do radiation if I was ever diagnosed with cancer, but that I would never, ever, EVER do chemo. It just wasn't worth it, based on what I saw.

      When I went for my first visit with an oncologist, I was told that my cancer was too advanced for radiation or surgery and that my treatment would be chemotherapy. I said, "OK." Sometimes, a person has to eat their words and I ate a bellyful of them. Chemo was a horrible experience for me, but I am still here and chemo was only a small part of my survival story (now, immunotherapy, that's a different story - it was a HUGE part of my story.)

      about 1 month ago
    • Bug's Avatar
      Bug

      I know several people who say they will never do chemo. I think one has to wait and see once they are in those shoes.

      about 1 month ago
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      Yes, that was me. Before cancer, I swore with uplifted hand I would refuse chemo. Unfortunately, my oncologist gave me no choice and told me I was to have chemo before they would even remove the cancer for fear of roague cells floating about and forming new tumors. I still hated chemo but had to take it if I wanted to have the surgery. HUGS and God bless.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Do you ever get tired of hearing people tell you how strong you are and how proud they are of you for being strong?

    27 answers
    • Ashera's Avatar
      Ashera

      Hate this statement - along with 'you go girl! you've got this you little warrior! Go kick butt! Soo Brave! etc' Like I feel like I need a dumb plastic Viking Helmet, a sword ....
      Those are the people that are unable to simply...see...me. They don't matter. Those that do see me - don't do the platitudes. Agree with all of you above!

      about 1 month ago
    • Dina's Avatar
      Dina

      gpgirl70 - I am 100% with you on that!

      about 1 month ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      You all said all of the things I was thinking. I say, THANK YOU to that person, then change the subject.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Are you making future plans for after treatment or waiting until it's over?

    14 answers
    • fiddler's Avatar
      fiddler

      This may not work for you, and I'm not giving advice or criticizing. When I went through treatment, I did not make plans. I just enjoyed each day on its own. I'm still that way - it was a total turnaround for me - usually I had plans for the near and far future. Illness helped me to see what's before me now. Now I'm 7 years older and still no plans, other than taking time to enjoy the southeast part of the state I live in once the ridiculous quarantine is lifted.

      4 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      Everyone needs to make plans for the future. What kind of plans, well that depends on different factors for each of us. Living with MBC has changed how I make plans. No one knows what is in store for the future. This pandemic proved that. Live your life, but you don't need to go overboard. If you need a new car, go for it. I did. Our car just wore out; he wanted a bottom of the line; I wanted a nice luxury sedan. I've had my previously owned Caddy ATS now for 4 yrs. It was a compromise. Not big like my Impala or small like the Malibu, but in between. I was doing chemo, sick, no hair, but he needed to do something so for a month he brought home cars for me to test drive. Enjoy the ride of making plans. I had no idea I would be here to enjoy driving 1.6 miles to the grocery in my Toy Caddy.

      about 1 month ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Make plans now. First, recurrence happen and you just never know what the future has in store. Secondly, make plans now. I actually went to Scotland for three weeks in the middle of chemotherapy. I made allowances, took naps, didn't push myself too hard and ate healthily, and had the best vacation ever. You can't put life on a shelf and wait.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Sleep issues, what works besides full on sleeping pills?

    27 answers
    • Patstrong's Avatar
      Patstrong

      Hi. I've had issues with sleep since my diagnosis two years ago. After my pneumenectomy and I came home from the hospital I still had a lot of sleep issues, I was Oxy for my pain for 7 days that helped a little but I didn't want to continue taking it. My doctor gave me Xanax, an anxiety medication because 90% of my issues were based on anxiety. I take on every night .5 mg before bed and I don't have any trouble sleeping unless there are other stressors going on in my life. Check it out it may work for you.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      That's what I use Patstrong, Xanax. I do not take it every night but whenever I find I am having serious sleep issues I take one. It calms me down, allows me to relax and usually I can fall asleep. I think the combination of Chronic fatigue and sleep deprivation has been one of the worst residual effects of cancer treatment.

      2 months ago
    • JazzQueen's Avatar
      JazzQueen

      I had chronic fatigue and didn't even know it .. used to take me an hour and a half just to get out of bed in the morning .. meds left me all fuzzy headed and stupid .. LOL .. better now I'm on Pomalyst!! 8=)

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    How many radiation treatments did you have?

    17 answers
    • fiddler's Avatar
      fiddler

      32
      triple negative
      stage 1a

      3 months ago
    • Ashera's Avatar
      Ashera

      35 planned - no changes.

      3 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I really don't remember the exact number, but it seemed like a lot. I just did what I was told, then. I know it lasted 6 weeks. I still have the scars. I was thankful that it was during the winter as I couldn't wear a bra.

      about 1 month ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Do you look forward to the weekend when you've been in treatments all week?

    8 answers
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      Yes, I looked forward to days where I didn't have to see a doctor, endure annoying needles, get zapped, or undergo any more chemo. Though I didn't do anything special, I looked forward to church because there, I would not only get hugged, the only physical touch that wasn't some kind of pluck and probe, nook or cranny, but it was a friendly place where the focus was on God and being with people not reminding me of cancer. When active treatment was over, it was the biggest relief to me not to have to trouble drivers to take me everywhere. I could just chill at home for a bit and let my body recover. HUGS and God bless.

      2 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      The only time I had daily treatments was when I got radiation ... and fortunately, I only had 15 days of radiation. Nevertheless, YES!!! I loved those days I didn't have to go for radiation!!! (I hate the long drive to my clinic - it is an hour away and I have to fight a ton of traffic and lights the whole way.)

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I remember being in treatments for my first 2 diagnoses, the weekends were heaven. Donna and I were living in the XXX hole known as Memphis, and would go home each weekend. The only drawback was on Sunday afternoon when we had to load up in the car and drive back. That was almost as bad as taking the treatments. But, I feel what you are saying.

      2 months ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    I found a meme on FB that describes to a T where I am in life after this diagnosis, I posted it on the Pinboard page.

    8 answers
    • msesq's Avatar
      msesq

      Very familiar

      3 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I agree. I try to stay focused on what matters the most or what I can control. I seem to talk to God more. Really helps deciding on what is truly important..

      3 months ago
    • junie1's Avatar
      junie1

      agree, After being dx for the 3rd time,, I, fining myself that there's no time to dwell on the stupid things. I listen to what's going on out here in the world,, and what's going on around me,, but I don't let engulf me.. Taking care of myself is my first priority, first and foremost. Life is going on,, and im trying to enjoy it as much as i can.
      I've busy sewing,, making things that I take to the Farmers Markets and Craft Markets to sell. That's so relaxing and fulfilling..
      Staying healthy is what's important now.

      2 months ago
  • JustGrateful's Avatar

    JustGrateful asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Since you were diagnosed, do you find yourself looking at other people envious?

    17 answers
    • Grandy's Avatar
      Grandy

      Yes, at times. I think those thoughts go through a lot of heads. But as time goes by, it gets better.

      3 months ago
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      This was me for sure for a time. I was even jealous of cancer patients who were lower in staging and didn’t need chemo. I was frustrated by my own decisions because I became envious of women with breasts. Time does provide perspective and healing. I’m now so happy with my body. I’m also now thankful for my experience because I appreciate every day. I cherish my friends and family in a new deeper way. I truly thought I might be angry, bitter and envious forever but now that has gone away completely. I’m five years from diagnosis.

      3 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      I have always loved to wear pretty clothes. I am a Chicos woman (always on sale - LOL). I have a permanent colostomy due to Stage IV rectal cancer. Would my husband still love me? How would I feel about myself? But the surgery was deemed "potentially curative," and I wanted to live.

      I quickly learned how to dress again because I started mop-up chemo six weeks after the surgery. I had to learn to dress and how to handle my ostomy in a group setting.

      I've learned a couple of tricks, and no one ever has a clue that I have a colostomy. It is all in our attitude towards ourselves. We quickly learn during and after cancer treatment that many other people have learned to adapt with "crappy" situations and make the most of life.

      3 months ago