• OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Who else had just a blast on Thanksgiving day watching everyone eat all the great food?

    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Hey, you were there. I can't decide if you're being sarcastic or if you really did enjoy watching others enjoy the food. But, you were there! I was just talking about all the stuff we're left to deal with after diagnosis and treatment on another question. Is it all worth it? Only you can answer that question for your own situation. But, you were there!

      8 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      We decided to cancel Thanksgiving. My mother was not feeling well and our 43-year-old son passed away from a heart attack last November ... somehow, no one really had the push to go to the effort to have Thanksgiving.

      I have to say, it was pretty sad not "doing" Thanksgiving, even if our numbers would be very small ... next year, God willing, i think Thanksgiving is going to happen.

      8 days ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Part of what we enjoy is just being together. Being able to eat would be good too. I can eat a good bit as long as I have gravy, but not like it used to be. I feel your eating pains.

      8 days ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    How do you stay positive that your treatment will be successful when others around you are dying?

    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Having received a 99.5% chance of succumbing to any one of the three cancers over the past 11 years (even all three simultaneously)y, or to the allogeneic stem cell transplant I received, or to the Graft-versus-Host-Disease ever since, I did not listen to the numbers, because I am not a number. I am a person and a name.

      Oh, there were also thousands of prayers and anointing with oil. Cannot discount that.

      about 1 month ago
    • goyler's Avatar
      goyler

      I thought the same thing for a while myself but my doctor kept telling me, "somebody has to get better, why not you?" I love my doctor. I am in remission from stage IV, grade IV Kidney cancer for the past three years. I was diagnosed in 2013 and have beat the odds. Yes, the odds are stacked against you but "why not you?" Everyone is different.

      about 1 month ago
    • Ydnar2xer's Avatar
      Ydnar2xer

      I've been told my attitude was good during both times I had cancer treatment and I am glad about that. I figured a positive attitude for ME would help, plus the fact that NOBODY would want to be around me if I were all "gloom and doom". So I chose to be POSITIVE. It seems to have worked, so far---I am 16 years from first b/c diagnosis, 7 from the second. Am hoping now to avoid b/c number 3 since I only had TWO breasts to begin with! (Silly, I know, but it works!)

      about 1 month ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Do you have a friend or relative that has been diagnosed with cancer that won't take your advice?

    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      This is a tough one, no doubt! Unfortunately many of us were raised to “respect authority” and to not challenge. When it is hard wired, getting unwired takes a lot of courage and a lot of hard work. You didn’t say what kind of cancer or stage, grade, Mets, etc, so I’m wondering if your friend has something w a poor prognosis (like pancreatic cancer) and feels like it is futile or doesn’t have the energy to fight. Probably the most important thing you can do is to be supportive of their choices. It sounds like you have tried to convince them to take other actions so they know where you stand. Now, they need you to be supportive without risking sounding judgmental or like you are nagging. You could risk them isolating from you, which would be worse for both of you. Remember: the road to XXX is paved with good intentions.

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have been where you are now in trying to convince someone that something just didn't seem right. Our experience with going through lots of these things does give us a little advantage in knowing what to expect, how things "normally" go and when we should ask a few questions. If you have tried and are meeting resistance you will have to decide when you have to say you've done all you can do, what will be, will be.

      2 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      YES! My sister was diagnosed last year with stage IV pancreatic cancer and she's driving me crazy. She isn't doing the basics to take care of herself, won't ask for pain meds, basically does everything wrong. She did finally get a second opinion but that was only because she wanted a doctor to tell her what she wanted to hear - didn't happen.

      Anyway, long story short, I told her when she was first diagnosed that this is HER JOURNEY and she gets to do it or not, any way she pleases. No one else can walk the walk for her. We can suggest, we can pray, we can cajole, but in the end, it's her life, her journey, her cancer.

      I hope she's happy with the choices she's making and the life she's leading. I love her dearly and wish her the best. Some of her choices are driving me crazy but I have my own journey with cancer and I choose to do it differently. Again, it's all about individual choice.

      2 months ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Does chemo give anyone an ear ache? The kind that just won't go away?

    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I haven't had that. But the ear can be sensitive to the chemicals put in your body. I would tell the nurse next time you have chemo about this but I wouldn't worry too much about it. Your body is going through a lot and this may be just a little quirky thing that chemo is causing. Hugs to you as you continue treatment.

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      It seems like I remember having some ringing in my ears. I don't remember an earache specifically, but then again, I remember everything hurting.

      2 months ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      I had surgery in March and had a physical w my PCP the day before. She checked my ears per usual, nothing notable. I had been having what I thought was post nasal drip along with tinnitus. Long story short, my eardrum ruptured during surgery. Weird, I know. Docs all thought there must have been congestion behind the eardrum. After treatment the “post nasal” and tinnitus cleared completely up. So, all of this to say, ears can be weird & the chemo may be exacerbating something else going on with your ear so I would definitely mention at your next treatment.

      2 months ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Thank you to the floor nurses? Gifts, donuts? Cards? What?

    8 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I make it a point to tell everyone that has anything to do with my treatment, care, survival, that I appreciate them. I have heard patients in the ER literally cussing and screaming at nurses, and watched those nurses bite their lip and continue doing their job and walk out of the room without going off. I'm not sure I would have the composure to do that. I apologized to a nurse who was subjected to that in the name of all patients. I told him that we appreciated him and most do, that one lady was just mad at the world and XXX that she couldn't get her drugs as soon as she wanted. Donuts, fruit, gift cards, or anything personal that individuals would appreciate are great too. A big sincere THANK YOU goes a long way.

      3 months ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I start out with a blank piece of paper and a pen. I start with the ambulance crew's names and the "run #". A week and a half ago I was rushed to the ER. By the time I eventually got home I had more than 25 names. I always send a letter of appreciation to the CEO of the hospital. I, too, have seen one of my letters hanging from a bulletin board. I'm known there for my homemade cookies (my Christmas gifts each year) so I try to do a lot of them and drop them off, and that includes a stop at the fire station. Everyone loves when apples are in season. Our town is known as the apple capital of my state. Our apple houses just opened 2 weeks ago and I've been busy making loaves of apple nut cakes. They, too, are shared with my medical staff. I think it is wonderful when someone takes the time to just say "thank you" in the form of a note or letter. I know how much that is appreciated. My only 2 nieces are nurses and I've heard all the horror stories of verbal abuse.

      3 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I sent a really nice bouquet of flowers to the nurses addressed to that floor, ward, and station, with a nice card thanking them for their care and concern for me, my family and guests. My husband bought them at the hospital gift shop to ensure the flowers had a trouble free delivery.

      Also, it's a nicer touch to send them a few days after discharge, rather than while you are there. It means that you don't expect extra care. It means that you feel they really did something for you. I'm the type of person that finds too many thank yous sort of embarrassing.

      The head shift nurses sent me a thank you card, so I knew they received the flowers. They said- staff from all over came and swooned over them.

      Candy-gain weight, have allergies, or diabetic-and somebody takes them.
      A thank you card-greatly appreciated but can be lost.

      Too many people to buy a small and wanted gift. Anyway, what one likes, another might not like--and what if you miss the nurse that did the most for you on the first day-and that nurse took time off-and you don't get something for her/him.

      Male nurses enjoy group flowers too.

      Good luck-get better--and you have a good heart.

      3 months ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    I was reading the blog post about cancer leaving a scar or disfigurement

    6 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Me. I have gained so much weight. Too bad we can't share - we'd probably both look better. And my hair didn't disappear, but its texture changed. I never had pretty hair. Now I really, really don't have pretty hair... And, I think the last seven years or so have aged me 20 years or maybe more...

      It is truly an effort every time I go out to put a smile on my face and step out of the house to be seen as I am today instead of who I once was ... but you know, that's only stuff on the outside. I think people start seeing your inner glow and don't even notice the outside trappings.

      Hey, we're survivors!!!! We might have some battle scars, but we're still here!

      4 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      OldGuy, I so agree with what everyone here said, especially LWC (made me laugh the way she spoke about her hair). And what JaneA wrote REALLY made me laugh, and I hope it made you laugh, too, as you imagine rocking that look (of course, I don’t know you, so maybe that look works for you!). Not trying to be flippant about a real problem you’re having, and I hope you can overcome your self-consciousness and go out and forget how you look. Maybe wear loose clothing that disguises your thinness. And don’t forget the lipstick! Hugs from another self-conscience person, self-conscience for other reasons.

      4 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      I just lost my hair over the weekend and am still trying to get used to the idea of my long locks being completely gone. I wasn't expecting to lose it on this chemo because my oncologist said it rarely happens with FOLFIRI. At least it will grow back. My daughters are freaking out a bit.

      So I ordered about 6 head scarves on Amazon and am trying to decide which one i will rock tomorrow while hopefully it grows back.

      I have had scarring that's extensive in my stomach area, a colostomy and later an ileostomy. I was very lucky and we able to get them reversed, but it took a while to get over it and start to live a normal life around them before the reversal. I think that having gone through that helps me now because i came to terms with my general body changing. I even had to face the loss of a lot of my sexual function to top it off!

      I am so lucky to have found out that my family doesn't care. They want me here whether I have those scars or not, am missing my hair, can control my bowel. It just doesn't matter. My husband fell asleep tonight holding my arm and thanking God I'm home and safe next to him.

      The people who love you in your life are seeing the person in your eyes. It may take them a second to get used to you looking different but they'll just be glad to still see you. I hope you have lots of people like that in your life to help you get used to the changes, and a long survival to enjoy those people who help you through all of this! We're here for you to o if you have more questions!

      4 months ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    I am having some pain in my mouth from the chemo making sores. I need suggestions for soft or liquid things to eat.

    9 answers
    • Gabbymom04's Avatar
      Gabbymom04

      Hi, grits, oatmeal, ground sausage or crumbled bacon in omelettes or scrambled eggs(boiled eggs are also good..they didn't seem to irritate my mouth). Soups, even ramen or udon soups, egg noddles and spaghetti(but watch the sauce...I had to switch to butter and cream sauces instead of the traditional spaghetti sauce because it was a bit irritating..so that might need some experimenting. any ground meats with rice, mashed potatoes..(shepherds pie is GREAT),And this will shock you...fish, it totally just melts in your mouth(uhm..not fried..but you can bake it, broil it, even grilled it stays soft and tender--but watch the spices..I found out pepper is not my mouth sores friend!!, tuna fish,surimi.... egg sandwich,applesauce, ..and smoothies, sorbets, ice creams, and if you can drink them the ensure, or other meal supplement drinks.

      Did your doctor give you the Benadryl/Maalox/Lidocaine mouthwash blend to help? Mine gave it to me to swish around my mouth before eating...of course it made everything in my mouth numb...so I started taking a q-tip and just applying it like a dentist before an injection on my inner cheeks, and only gargled/swallowed with it when my throat hurt.
      Also, I rinse with 1/2 tsp of baking soad with 1/2 tsp of salt in 1 cup warm water. I usually do it when I wake up, after I eat, and before going to bed...I think it really helped/helps.
      I hope this helps and pray those sores go away soon.

      6 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      During treatment, we need protein to help rebuild our muscles and tissue. Boost PLUS has about 30 grams of protein and vitamins and minerals; my surgeon highly recommends this before surgery to build you up and after surgery for nutrition. I found that the chocolate flavor tastes really good. I would swirl it in my blender with some ice and make a smoothie.

      6 months ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      I lived off of instant breakfast. I would make it in the blender and add fresh fruit at times. I also kept a lot of frozen fruit in the freezer and made smoothie with the fruit, yogurt, fruit juice and basically anything I felt like adding that day.

      6 months ago