• A friend just insists that I join her in this keto diet.

    Asked by MyLungCancer on Thursday, February 13, 2020

    A friend just insists that I join her in this keto diet.

    Can someone explain to me what the noise is about this diet? And what would be the benefits or negatives be for someone on treatments or past treatments?

    15 Answers from the Community

    15 answers
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      I would check with my oncologist before starting any diet. Our bodies are working so hard during these treatments, it may not be the best for you. I want to concentrate on stomping this evil thing! The few peeps I know who went on Keto lost weight BUT when they stopped, it came back to visit.

      11 days ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      A keto diet is low carbs and high fat. Personally, I don't think that this is a safe diet with so much fat.

      Most of us with cancer need a higher-protein diet to help rebuild muscle tissue that we lost during treatment. Your oncologist is the most appropriate person to advise you on your diet.

      I believe that exercise (strength training like weights and resistance bands) do more for us than any kind of "fad" diet.

      11 days ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have never been a fan of any of these special diets that come and go. 100 years ago people didn't need a "special" diet to get by. We don't need them now. Eat a balanced and nutritious diet and watch your portions, don't eat the whole bowl of whatever it is you're eating, and you should be fine. I would politely decline and use your cancer and oncologist as an excuse if you need one to not hurt your friends feelings.

      11 days ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      Keto is just another fad diet. They come and go ~ none of them stick around long, and with good reason. They aren't good for you. Stick with a balanced diet and maybe add some extra protein such as a protein shake drink once a day, or just eat more high protein meats like chicken. Stay away from fad diets whether you're doing treatments or not. Best of luck to you in your battle with the monster.

      11 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Funny how everyone else knows what is best for us. I admire their zeal, but their compassion and investigative skills, not so much. I like to distill things to their essence: your friend has not preserved your life thus far - doctor has. Therefore...

      11 days ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      My neighbor, who by the way raises Angus, tried to sell me on the keto diet. I agree with whoever said high fat and cancer do not mix. I try to just eat a balanced diet with whole grains, lots of fruits and veggies, chicken, fish, low fat dairy for bone health but light on the red meat, pasta, etc... The Common Sense Diet is the best.

      11 days ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      Our kidneys deal with filtering all sorts of crap. My urologist said 6 oz max. Keto tough on them.

      11 days ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      I was going to a nutrition doctor, PhD who, while I was undergoing chemo/radiation told me to eat MacDonald’s burgers. People do lose weight using the Keto diet but, it comes back once they quit and it in no way is going to cure cancer or prevent a recurrence.

      11 days ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      MacDonald"s hamburgers? Serioysly? When I was undergoing chemo just the thought would have made me throw up. Yuck.

      10 days ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      McDonalds burgers??? Q: Who is the #1 purchaser of cows' eyeballs in the world? A: McDonalds. Nuff said.

      10 days ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      KB2013 thanx for the link. My question is this ~ if they use only the muscle of the beef, what are those hard little chunks in their patties? The ones you can't chew? If they aren't ground up eyeballs, are they bone? Gristle? If cows' eyes aren't beef then what are they? Pork? Mutton? Snopes has come under scrutiny many times in the recent past for furnishing bad info, and in this instance they offer no proof of anything, merely their reasons for believing their claim. The USDA has very lax rules governing what can and cannot go into our food. How many rat hairs and mouse feces are allowed in chocolate? Look it up. At any rate, I don't eat McBurgers and haven't for many years simply because I do not like them.

      8 days ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      Be nice to get back to question and giving supportive thoughts. Hugs!

      8 days ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Diets should like shoes should fit the individual. There was a dietitian on my cancer team. I had regular appointments with her during treatment. After that my PCP referred me a dietitian 2 visits a year. Right now I am working with my Drs on pain management through diet. Basically they have done blood tests and determined what nutrients that I am deficient in. Then discussed ways to get them into my diet.

      8 days ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      BoiseB I had a dietician on my treatment team as well, and she told me to limit fats and red meat, and eat lots of chicken white meat with no breading. I try to follow her advice for the most part even now that the cancer is gone. That being said, I sometimes just have to have a big ole juicy cheeseburger. That doesn't mean McGarbage though.

      7 days ago

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