• A year without hugs?

    Asked by HearMeRoar on Sunday, January 27, 2013

    A year without hugs?

    Working super hard to stay positive and optimistic and overall it is working. I just had a moment realizing it might be a hug-less year for me? I need hugs and snuggles from my boys... what will the world come to? How long before other mom's could hug in this process? Small but not minor detail =(

    12 Answers from the Community

    12 answers
    • karen1956's Avatar
      karen1956

      Why a year without hugs!!!! No reason not to get a hug from people, epecially your boys!!! I worked in an elementary school all through Dx and Tx and still let the kids hug me as long as they were healthy.....and my own family....my kids were 7, 16 and 19 at time of Dx and I sure wasn't going to not get hugs from them....

      about 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Why can't you hug them? The only issue might be if they get sick while your are in chemo and your WBC is down. If your WBC is low, you are more vulnerable to getting infections. That's true whether you have cancer or not.

      about 4 years ago
    • HearMeRoar's Avatar
      HearMeRoar

      worried about pain of TEs I am reading about, not chemo.

      about 4 years ago
    • karen1956's Avatar
      karen1956

      TE's are uncomfortable, but not so much that you can't get hugs....I had my TE's for 12 1/2 months and the only thing they prevented me from doing was sleeping on my stomach!!!! Hugs might need to be gentle, but you can get all the hugs that you want!!!!

      about 4 years ago
    • HearMeRoar's Avatar
      HearMeRoar

      what a relief! seriously... thanks ladies!

      about 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      I have TE and no problem with hugs, especially from my kids. I will tell you a funny story: Very shortly after my mastectomy I told my neighbor I had BC and she jumped to her feet and threw her arms around me in a supportive gesture. Ow! I had to quickly disentangle myself from her bear hug and explain that I'd already had surgery so she'd have to be more gentle. I found it funny and I was moved by the spontaneous affection of her gesture.

      about 4 years ago
    • Nancebeth's Avatar
      Nancebeth

      I went straight to implants, no tissue expanders and I was sore but got gentle hugs for the first few weeks. I avoided hugs and kisses when my white counts were low from chemo, but otherwise hugs were not an issue.
      Hug on sister!

      about 4 years ago
    • HearMeRoar's Avatar
      HearMeRoar

      long live the hug!! =)

      about 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      You may have to careful and not hug to hard the first couple of weeks after surgery and/or radiation. But unless you boys have a really bad cold, running a fever, etc, you should hug them as much and as often as they will let you. Sending you a virtual hug right now.

      about 4 years ago
    • Mel's Avatar
      Mel

      I say hug away!!!.... I did try to stay away if people were sick. But sometimes a hug can do so much!. I had a neighbor lady wouldn't see her everyday, but would see me outside knew everything I was going through she would say Hi how are you and me I'm always fine even when not. Would stop and hug me and sometimes I'd just cry but that hug meant so much and nothing to explain she just knew I needed it. :)

      about 4 years ago
    • Carol-Charlie's Avatar
      Carol-Charlie

      Oh my goodness NO!!!!!! ((((((((HearMeRoar))))))))))) Try my very special Cyber Hugs. They can be given and recived at any time. Trust me. They always come with a smile, and a motherly voice saying. "Trust God, it will be good"

      about 4 years ago
    • Carol-Charlie's Avatar
      Carol-Charlie

      Oh my goodness NO!!!!!! ((((((((HearMeRoar))))))))))) Try my very special Cyber Hugs. They can be given and recived at any time. Trust me. They always come with a smile, and a motherly voice saying. "Trust God, it will be good"

      about 4 years ago

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