• "Agressive?"

    Asked by KBAJ on Tuesday, June 7, 2016

    "Agressive?"

    Can someone tell me how the Doctor determines if one has an "aggressive" form of prostate cancer? I mean, I know that the Gleason score has something to do with it. But isn't that mostly just used for staging how far along the disease already is? Have you all had specific pathology tests? Thanks in advance...

    10 Answers from the Community

    10 answers
    • lindi143's Avatar
      lindi143

      The Gleason score will tell if it is aggressive sometimes as they can tell by looking at the cells from the biopsy. However, you cant just go by that. They thought my husband was contained they were sure it was NOPE it had spread outside the prostate. That was only found when the prostate was removed and then biopsied. We are not confident about anythind the doctors say. He is on Hormone treatment and the PSA is <.01 soo not sure how long they will keep him on it. He had 5 doses of Chemo too. Chemo is soooooo terrible. His was aggressive so they did the Chemo and hormone he had many side effects from the chemo and still does. The one thing people say is " O prostate is the good cancer" really no cancer is good and prostate can be fast too. My husband is young to have it. We had the bone scans and they were clear them they say well,, unless it is real bad it does not show on a scan wow thanks Doc for all the encourgemenr.

      over 3 years ago
    • lindi143's Avatar
      lindi143

      I am the spouse and will be happy to share with you any thing that can help i have found this group has been much more helpful thatn the doctors. When my husband had surgery we were not told what he would need at home . i posted it here and a wonderful lady gave me a complete list she had been with her husband through it. I find this site to be invaluable. it is priceless for the info and support.

      over 3 years ago
    • Whitey61's Avatar
      Whitey61

      Yes Gleason score determines the aggressiveness of the PC along with trending of your PSA,all derived from the biopsy,digital rectal exam,and final biopsy results...In my case, normal PSA 1/14 annual physical .02 ,10 months later 10.5??came out of nowhere,and only got it checked because of sudden frequent urinating at nite, final diagnosis 1/15 Gleason 9,4+5,.started Biccaludimide,and Lupron HDT.which shrunk prostate tumor 90%,due to it being an Adenocarcinoma that thrives off testosterone,started cycle 1 of chemo due to being staged III,spread outside prostate to lymph nodes..had prostate Robotic surgery 11/2015,with lymph node dissection...several positive nodes confirmed a secondary mutation called a Neuroendicrine component.back on chemo cycle 2 on 1/16-4/16...latest Abdominal/Pelvic CT scans and Bone scan all clean..currently on active 3 month surveillance till 8/16 which scans will be repeated,feel great and back to doing everything I did before diagnosis..my faith, positive reinforcement of all those around me.top notch medical team ,and love of family will continue to carry me thru my PC journey.

      over 3 years ago
    • KBAJ's Avatar
      KBAJ

      Wow, Whitey61, you have been through a lot! Certainly inspirational. Thanks for the response. Best wishes.

      over 3 years ago
    • Ross' Avatar
      Ross

      Each of our stories tell of different treatments and results, but they can help others to see how the treatments worked. 6 1/2 years ago my biopsy showed 7 samples with cancer and Gleason of 7. After surgery, My urologist said the biopsy then showed cancer beyond the prostate and stage III. So after 3 months, I had 2 months of radiation. I was on Lupron and Casadex for about 4 years. I am now off all drugs and treatment with a psa at >.01. I feel good, exercise, play tennis, watch my diet and enjoy life(with some adjustments of course).
      Best to all as they continue their journeys.
      A survivor, Ross

      over 3 years ago
    • Whitey61's Avatar
      Whitey61

      Yes it was a year from XXX with all the chemo..cycle 2 was 4 days a week every 3 weeks...I handled it well and still worked my part time job..was on 4 different chemo cocktails..surgery was successful but a week in hosp ..not 2/3 days as told?...after 4 days home developed fever and infection...back in hosp for another week in isolation..recovered again. But a good 2 months to recover from surgery...doin great at moment and fight continues...don't look back at any of this ..just ahead to keep living..

      over 3 years ago
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      Today they have additional tools like mutation testing which can help bring more information into the equation. But this is really a conversation you should have with the Oncologist. Have them explain all details to you so you are fully engaged in your treatment plan and most importantly why the treatment plan has been selected..

      All Cancers have at least one mutation ( driver) and one mutation which is a switch off to Cancer growth which has also been mutated or damaged. These two mutations cause the perfect storm in the body and Cancer begins..Targeted treatments are designed to address these two events.

      In addition Cancer changes all the time..It can start out aggressive and then just stop for a while and vise versa.

      over 3 years ago
    • lindi143's Avatar
      lindi143

      CAS1 Thank you for the post I have not heard the mutation info. As i said I have asked questions but the doctors are not very good I k now they see this all the time and I guess that is waht they just give the quick answers Thank you again for the info.

      over 3 years ago
    • KBAJ's Avatar
      KBAJ

      CAS1 - thanks so much for the info... we have another appointment coming up with the oncologist. Hope he's ready for all my questions! Was the mutation testing covered by your insurance?

      over 3 years ago
    • Roger2Dodger's Avatar
      Roger2Dodger

      My pathology remains from my biopsy were sent to https://prolaris.myriad.com/ ..Prolaris is a measure of how fast a prostate cancer tumor is growing. Biopsy tissue samples can be used to determine a patient’s personal Prolaris Score. Studies have shown that Prolaris provides an accurate assessment of cancer aggressiveness.1,2 And, because every individual’s prostate cancer is different, the result of each Prolaris test is unique to that patient.Mine came back in the non aggressive range.

      over 3 years ago

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