• Another question, what can she do to get some sleep?

    Asked by BobbyZ on Thursday, December 7, 2017

    Another question, what can she do to get some sleep?

    She says her mind won't stop turning. When she lays down at night she is awake when I drift off, when I wake up in the night, she's up. I know there is a lot on her mind, but she has to sleep! she doesn't want to take "sleeping pills" but I am going to encourage the Doctor to talk to her and give her something. What works for you?

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      I would encourage her to think about taking something. Sleep is necessary!

      I took an anti-anxiety med between the initial diagnosis until we knew for sure the stage and grade. Now, I take 1/2 a sleep aid I get from Costco(Kirkland brand) on nights I can't get to sleep and it helps a lot.

      about 2 years ago
    • happydyad's Avatar
      happydyad

      I recommend Bedtime Bliss eye mask and 20-40mg melatonin. I have breast cancer and “light at night” is associated with poorer outcomes so my son who’s brilliant got this eye mask for me. I didn’t really know what a good night’s sleep was until I used this eye mask with the high dose melatonin prescribed by my oncologist. This may help. Good luck! Judy in Ky

      about 2 years ago
    • downbutnotout's Avatar
      downbutnotout

      Thanks for these answers, I may try that too.

      about 2 years ago
    • NoLiver's Avatar
      NoLiver

      I use over the counter Tylenol PM, it's weak compared to prescriptions stuff but it works for me.

      about 2 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Ativan is not sleeping pills, but it is prescription. I've had a prescription since treatment. I'll have the gerbil that just will not get off that wheel when I'm trying to sleep. The Ativan lets the gerbil in my brain sleep, so that I can, too. Otherwise, some nights those thoughts just keep whirling. Hope she finds the help she needs, whether OTC, natural or Rx.

      about 2 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      I took Ativan to help me sleep. Sleep is very important while fighting and healing. If she is concerned, talk to the Dr about perscribing something non addictive

      about 2 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I tried music with a great deal of success There are eight hour programs on YouTube. I had a CD player that kept repeating. Also there are some 8 hour CDs available your CD Player doesn't repeat.

      about 2 years ago
    • Russ' Avatar
      Russ

      In my book I have dedicated one chapter to all the various side effects I had experienced...one of which I called "sleep deprivation." Not one doctor has ever referred to sleep deprivation as a side effect:

      There is no one treatment which I can say caused my sleep deprivation.  However, since I have heard the words, "you have pancreatic cancer"…how can one sleep comfortably?  Then the days building up to, during, and after my surgery…how can one sleep comfortably?  Then the chemotherapy treatments for 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for five weeks, and radiation treatments at the same time for five weeks...how can one sleep comfortably?  Then the follow up of a cat scan every 90 days for two years wondering if the cancer has returned…how can one sleep comfortably?  Sure I was able to catch some quick naps during the day, and night, but facing the statistics that only 4% of pancreatic cancer patients make it five years…how can one sleep comfortably?  I was never able to sleep comfortably for a very, very, long time.  It has only been as of late, after 11 years, that they seem to have leveled out.  Any long term side effect that I may experience still today is nothing but a minor inconvenience compared to where I was at 11 years ago.  They are just some of the things that I have learned to live with during my…"new normal life."
      My best to all of you... Russ                                                                                                                          

      about 2 years ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      During my journey, there were many nights of very little sleep. I saw my counselor. She recommended me to see my general doctor to get a prescription for Trazadone. It is a drug that helped me turn off my brain and get good sleep. I have been on it for four years now. And I don't wake up groggy from it either.

      about 2 years ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      My nurse suggested melatonin and it helped. I also have Ativan but I try not to take that every night. But some night I do and it really helps.

      about 2 years ago
    • happydyad's Avatar
      happydyad

      My oncologist has a naturopath that works with her. He prescribed GABA & theanine. When I need to calm my mind I take high doses. They help. I also find having a routine helps. Many nights I also remind myself of something a friend told me, “I am not going to die today and I”m not going to die tomorrow. In fact I probably won”t die this year.” It helps me focus on the fact that while this is serious, it is not an acute crisis that could completely unravel in a day. Also, I was recently prescribed modified citrus pectin (available on Amazon) which has a strong and well researched history of reducing current tumor load and blocking metastasis. I”ve read the PubMed articles and reviewed scientific lectures on it which has led me to have (for the first time since my diagnosis 3 years ago) a sense of hope that I might actually eventually manage to die of old age. Good luck. Judy in Ky

      about 2 years ago
    • Russ' Avatar
      Russ

      It sounds like there is some good info here for you. My best to you, and hopefully you can get some sleep. Russ

      about 2 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      My son went to the Dr. with an insomnia problem last Tuesday. The Dr. gave him a relaxation tape. He told me that it is already helping him. I guess tape is not the right word it was a CD.

      about 2 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      BuckeyeShelby, I have those same gerbils in my head, too! When my parents died last year, my doctor prescribed Ativan. It's for anxiety and nervousness, so it helps you relax, which is what we need.

      I think taking a shower right before bed makes me relax. If you hear everything around you, "white noise" helps. Even a fan that shuts out other noises is good.

      Russ, doctors sometimes don't tell you side effects because the power of suggestion will make you think you have that side effect.

      about 2 years ago
    • Russ' Avatar
      Russ

      Hello BarbarainBham, The doctors did tell me about side effects not just the one I used in my book "Sleep Deprivation." The chemo oncologist would blame any side effect on the radiation, and the radiation oncologist would blame that side effect on the chemo oncologist. My best to you... Russ

      about 2 years ago
    • BobbyZ's Avatar
      BobbyZ

      Thank you for all your suggestions, she is trying some of them and at times gets good sleep. Other nights, nothing helps. I'm sure it's tough for her. I have a hard time myself.

      about 2 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      BobbyZ, for the nights nothing helps, I would encourage her to ask her doctor for something to relax/sleep. Sleep is important for healing.

      Sometimes older women are just nervous or excited inside and can't sleep no matter what they do, which is why sleeping pills and relaxants like Ativan are available. I've also read that if you stay in bed and rest, it's better for you than getting up.

      about 2 years ago

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