• Any body have a total thyroidectomy still have trouble with your voice? (dry, scratchy, sore)

    Asked by LaceyBug on Tuesday, October 18, 2011

    Any body have a total thyroidectomy still have trouble with your voice? (dry, scratchy, sore)

    Any ideas on natural ways to relieve these issues?

    26 Answers from the Community

    26 answers
    • KarenG_WN's Avatar
      KarenG_WN

      Hi LaceyBug,

      Just wanted to reach out and let you know that as the WhatNext network evolves, we're reaching out to find some people who have had a total thyroidectomy to weigh in and give you some insight. We hope to find someone real soon who can help.

      We're thinking of you!

      Karen

      almost 6 years ago
    • lebeau22's Avatar
      lebeau22

      Hi Lacey, your comment was posted by WhatNext on the REACT Thyroid Foundation facebook page. I have not personally had any voice issues but checked with some others that I know and received the response below.

      Best Wishes,

      Michelle

      The acupuncture dr. recommended herbs to help the voice. The herbs are: Pang da hai (tea) that you can buy on the internet. Additionally, there's Reishi mushroom that can be purchased online or from a natural food store and an herb called Huang Shi Xiang Sheng Wan (pills) which can also be purchased online. The pills are primarily for voice improvement The herbs improved my immune system with all my bloodwork improving in one month. However, the acupuncture is relaxing and may be helpful, but I think the Medialization Injection improved my voice the most. If one VC is paralyzed, the injection can work. I ran into a woman at the Conference who had an injection 10 years ago and her voice is still functioning. The doctor at the conference also thinks implants are most effective. Muscle manipulation of the vocal chord can also be helpful per my ENT and the Dr. at the Conference.
      My doctor at Sloan does not agree with the herbs; but most western doctors do not.

      almost 6 years ago
    • SMT4's Avatar
      SMT4

      I have also had a full thyroidectomy . I had two surgeries 4 weeks apart and had my last two weeks ago, and have been trying to figure out some ways to deal with the throat issue as well. I have trouble with voice sometimes getting caught when I talk, and also pulling in my throat muscles when I swallow from the starting of scar tissue. My ENT surgeon told me to massage the throat lightly to help relax the throat muscles.

      almost 6 years ago
    • tak197's Avatar
      tak197

      For the dry throat, stay hydrated (big surprise, right?). Especially if you just had the surgery, because you need to heal still.

      I would also suggest talking to a Speech Pathologist, because they would be able to screen you for any voice issues, as well as tell you how to take care of your voice. (It's also what I want to do for my career, acute care speech-language pathology, so I studied a bit of it). My suggestion is to maintain a high level of vocal rest, and keep taking care of yourself.

      My S.O. told me yesterday that while there is less than a 1% chance of permanent paralysis of the RLN, surgery will likely create a temporary irritation to the nerve, making your voice hoarse.

      over 5 years ago
    • Chris' Avatar
      Chris

      After my thyroidectomy I had what I called my manly bedroom voice for 8 months. The doctor recommended voice rest and I would use honey to coat my throat.

      over 5 years ago
    • MTCMLE's Avatar
      MTCMLE

      My voice was scratchy, and I couldn't sing (which I love to do in the car) for about 3 months post-TT. I'm now 6 months out, and I have no vocal problems at all.

      over 5 years ago
    • hgbkokopelli's Avatar
      hgbkokopelli

      Yes I had a biker chicks voice for 6 months and no speech therapy, I was able to sing before but not any more. I used ice and would rest and then have no voice and wait until it came back and use it all and then suck on hard candies and mints to help or popsicles and gingerale pops.

      over 5 years ago
    • hikinggirl's Avatar
      hikinggirl

      I haven't got my surgery yet, but not sure if this site is helping or hurting me.. lol. hearing about all these complications further causes me to feel worried..

      over 5 years ago
    • TraciD's Avatar
      TraciD

      I had my surgery about 3 weeks ago, and my throat stil hurts so bad. I constantly try and clear it and it never clears.

      about 5 years ago
    • majgirl's Avatar
      majgirl

      Hi, Laceybug. I had total thyroidectomy 4 years ago. I talk a lot in my job and had a great deal of difficulty with my voice for quite a while (first year or so). I declined to be referred to a speech therapist early on as my doctor said that it could get better with time. While it has, my singing voice (never that good to begin with) has not really recovered, and I still find that at the end of a day of lots of talking my voice can be weak. It is much better overall though.

      about 5 years ago
    • bladesjj's Avatar
      bladesjj

      yes i do still have an itchy scratch voice.... lemon juice works wonders
      ...

      about 5 years ago
    • Carolina18's Avatar
      Carolina18

      After my thyroidectomy in April 2005, my throat was sore, but I was told it would improve. I had no volume in my voice. I could not leave voice mail messages for anyone or go to a drive-thru window. Well, sad to say, it did not get better. I was diagnosed with a paralyzed right vocal cord 3 months after my thyroidectomy. In October of 2005 I attended my first ThyCa (Thyroid Cancer Survivor) Conference. The sessions at the conference were outstanding and I realized that the other people attending were on a thyroid cancer journey, too. The sessions were great and so helpful with doctors from all over the U.S. coming to speak to US! They were not there speaking to other doctors. They were simply there to enable us to understand more about our issues. I heard one of the doctors speak on vocal cord issues. I realized then that he was the one I needed to listen to. After the session was over, I visited with him letting him know my diagnosis. He referred me on to a wonderful otolaryngologist at Vanderbilt Medical Center. I did have an injection into my damaged vocal cord. That was only a temporary fix. I did need to wait over a year to see if the vocal cord would awake. Mine did not. For most, it will awake. Now, I have an implant next to my paralyzed vocal cord and I sound normal. However, I cannot sing anymore, but more importantly, I can call for help if I ever needed to do so. I do hope your voice is better now.

      about 5 years ago
    • Jecklehyde's Avatar
      Jecklehyde

      Hi LacyBug. Yes as above, my vocal chords were also damaged and I had implants put on both vocal chords. I now have a normal voice. Singing is tuff, but I never could sing to begin with! I also found out who to reach out to at a ThyCa Conference.

      about 5 years ago
    • Marilynt's Avatar
      Marilynt

      I had a thyroidectomy 3 years ago and my mouth still gets very dry. I try to suck on lemon drops or mints when it is bothersome. I cannot project my voice in noisy environments and have difficulty projecting my voice when in the classroom where I teach. I have not found a way to correct this, but am willing to listen to suggestions.

      about 5 years ago
    • Ian's Avatar
      Ian

      Hi LaceyBug,

      I had a total thyroidectomy on the 25th of July. My doctor confirmed a week later by placing a not very pleasant tub down my nose that right side of my larynx was paralysed. My tumour was wrapped around the right side laryngeal nerve. I was having shortness of breath and my voice was up and down like a yoyo, I found it hard to make myself heard especially in noisy places. If I tried to raise my voice I could feel my voice just go in a hoarse chorus of vibrations. I am now around 7 weeks post op and breathing is almost normal and my voice feels a whole lot better. I know that the right side is still not working but I guess out of pig headed determination I have got the left side compensating. I think a speech therapist should be able to help you train your larynx. I guess I was lucky in that I managed to do it myself. The things that helped me were not trying to speak to loud as it would crack the voice, thinking what I was going to say and form the words in my head before saying things (this helps in so many other good ways as well and avoids me shooting of my mouth). Try and keep calm. Every time I got frustrated or stressed my voice would go.

      I am not at the point where I could yell across a football field but I can certainly call my kids at the end of the drive and finally order a coffee in Starbucks without having to lean right over the counter.

      Good luck and keep the faith. It will get better just remember to breath :-)

      Ian

      about 5 years ago
    • Tracy's Avatar
      Tracy

      After my treatment in the mid 1970's one of my vocal cords was partially paralyzed. I had little control over my voice for many years and talked very quietly. After about 5 years I regained control over my voice. I still keep sugar free candies and gum in all my bags, car etc because of damaged saliva glands (severe dry mouth) but slowly nerve damage has come back. Because of the time without control I think more before I speak and I think it actually helped my life. I never yelled at anyone and I have more patience in my life. Tracy

      about 5 years ago
    • janettem's Avatar
      janettem

      Thyroid cancer seems to be the stepchild of cancer treatment. It responds well to treatment and no one worries about the side effects. I lost my voice for a while after surgery and it was monotone when it returned. I had to retrain myself to speak with modulation. A choir teacher friend suggested I breathe and speak from my diaphragm as though I were singing. I can speak normally now but shouting is hard. I don't think I will get my singing voice back. My salivary glands were damaged from radiation. My dentist recommended biotin paste and mouthwash and keeping my mouth moist with sugar free candy and gum. It's been 8 years and I have some sense of producing more saliva naturally, so there is hope there.

      almost 5 years ago
    • MAH346's Avatar
      MAH346

      My surgeon said that the voice issues were caused by the breathing tube used for the surgery, and that time and avoiding straining the vocal cords were the best remedy - i am now six months out from the surgery and my voice is almost back to 100 percent.

      almost 5 years ago
    • Nenny-Who's Avatar
      Nenny-Who

      I had my removed in 1999 and to this day at Times have problems with my voice. Hot water lemon and honey work well to help. The hot water warms your throat the lemon gets rid of the dry and soreness, the honey removes the scratchness. hopefully it will work for you too.

      over 4 years ago
    • Meera's Avatar
      Meera

      I had the same thing, but have been going to an excellent speech therapist at MGH, who has really helped. I try and hydrate myself more, remind myself of the posture of my neck and do ecercises to loosen my neck muscles. He has also shown me how to massage a specific muscle in the neck, as well as how to speak from the front of my mouth so your throat/ voice box gets a rest. Allthis has helped me a lot, including some stress reduction techniques in my life he recommended. But each individu al differs. Try a speech therapist. They will usually give you more individual care than your doctors!

      about 4 years ago
    • Meera's Avatar
      Meera

      I had the same thing, but have been going to an excellent speech therapist at MGH, who has really helped. I try and hydrate myself more, remind myself of the posture of my neck and do ecercises to loosen my neck muscles. He has also shown me how to massage a specific muscle in the neck, as well as how to speak from the front of my mouth so your throat/ voice box gets a rest. Allthis has helped me a lot, including some stress reduction techniques in my life he recommended. But each individu al differs. Try a speech therapist. They will usually give you more individual care than your doctors! By the way this was after a total thyroidectomy.

      about 4 years ago
    • mom66's Avatar
      mom66

      8 weeks post TT, and still have voice issues in early am, sound like a deep man voice, scratchy. I also have trouble singing high notes, did not have trouble before. I have found that hard candy and hydration also work. I drink a lot of water during the day, resting my voice does help.

      over 3 years ago
    • linda_'s Avatar
      linda_

      I borrowed a glass straw from a family member who is a speach pathologist. You immerse it an inch or so under water and sing/make sounds and the resistance from the water works your vocal chords back into shape basically. It helped my voice a lot.

      over 3 years ago
    • Inerspirit's Avatar
      Inerspirit

      I had. TT 2 years ago. My voice still gets hoarse at times, especially when I am tired. I also feel like there is a lump when I swallow. I recently went for a cat scan to be sure there wasn't anything there to worry about. I told the doctor that if it was normal.....i could live with the rest.... No problem. It was negative and so I just know that after my throidectomy......i have a new raspy voice when I'm tired and the different feeling when I swallow is"normal" for me.

      about 1 year ago
    • Babygirlkt's Avatar
      Babygirlkt

      I've recently had a complete removal of my thyroids.
      My throat on the inside has pain...is that normal.
      There are moments when I can't swallow certain foods

      about 1 year ago
    • ThomasOrDZ's Avatar

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