• Are you happy with your doctors and your treatment plan or are you just accepting it due to lack of resources.....

    Asked by CancerChicky on Monday, September 9, 2019

    Are you happy with your doctors and your treatment plan or are you just accepting it due to lack of resources.....

    or area that you live, or inability to go to another area for a second opinion or new doctor?

    I am torn, I like my doctor OK, but he's all over the place emotionally. One minute he is positive and talks like we have no problem. Then the next time I see him he talks like I'm another patient with doubts about my treatment working. I have just accepted it due to limitations up to this point.

    5 Answers from the Community

    5 answers
    • MiriamMarino's Avatar
      MiriamMarino

      I traveled to NYC, NY from Charlotte, NC to obtain a second opinion from a renowned Cancer Center located in NYC. This helped me to see other treatment options and I discussed this with my Oncologist in NC.

      12 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I LOVE my medical team. I switched from the first practice where I was treated to a research hospital which was the best move ever.

      I am fortunate to live in a metropolitan area where there are lots of choices.

      If there's any way you can, I strongly suggest trying to find a doctor you trust and like.

      12 days ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Those of us who live in rural area face special challenges. I live in rural GA, but my medical team provided me care exactly to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for my Stage IV rectal cancer. Those are the same guidelines that the urban cancer centers follow.

      Here's the link to a free download to treatment guidelines. https://www.nccn.org/patients/guidelines/cancers.aspx

      Trust is such an important part of our treatment. But our connection with our doctor is also important. Perhaps you could get a second opinion from a larger hospital and like, Mariam said, they could work with your local doctor. Best wishes. Cancer is more difficult in rural KS or rural GA.

      12 days ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I do live in a rural area with a small oncology care center attached to the local hospital. They have connections to a big regional medical center hours away but we basically have two medical oncologist, one specializing in breast cancer, one a hemotologist, then the one radiology oncologist. Not many choices unless one wants to travel many miles. We seem to have a big turnover with doctors. You just get comfortable with the person and they're gone and you have to start over with a complete stranger. Continuity of treatment is so important to a patient 's well-being. I start with a brand new person this month so will see how it goes. I like the convenience of being treated locally but sometimes question the quality of care.

      12 days ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I've always said, ya gotta click w/your doctor. Going in to my first appt w/the gynecological surgical oncologist, I sat in the waiting room, fretting because I should have been seeing a doctor at the big cancer center in town. I calmed myself down, saying that's why they made 2nd opinions. Then I met my surgeon. Little ol' guy reached across the desk, shook my hand and said, "It's nice to meet you. I'm sorry you're here." Click! I didn't find out he was the head of oncology until after surgery. Didn't care. I stayed w/him until he retired about 4 years ago. Left off w/that practice following me with his replacement because I didn't need a 16 yr old who had met me twice looking down at me, with her size 2 bod, telling me I needed bariatric surgery. Missie, you don't know me. You've spent maybe 15 minutes with me. How do you know that I'm psychologically fit to go there? I don't think I am. I was done with that practice. I still have my medical oncologist (the chemo guy) following me 7 yrs later.

      12 days ago

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