• Lgb's Avatar

    Arm pain

    Asked by Lgb on Sunday, February 17, 2013

    Arm pain

    I had lumpectomy with 12 nodes removed Nov 2012. I have not had problems till last week. When I try to straighten my arm on affected side it feels tight like a rubber band about ready to break from my armpit to wrist with worst around elbow. No swelling, redness, or fever. Has anyone else experienced this?

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I still have some stiffness/soreness from my surgery and that has been almost a year ago. But mine as been consistent and has not worsened. Are you taking an aromatase inhibitor for ER+ breast cancer? That can cause some bone and joint stiffness that can feel like tendinitis in your elbow.. There is also a condition known as "trigger finger" that usually occurs in fingers or toes but could be in an elbow that can be a side effect of aromatase inhibitors or of chemo induced peripheral neuropathy. However, with the number of nodes you had removed, I would not rule out lyphedema, even if you don't see any noticeable swelling. In anycase, I would contact your oncologist to report your symptoms.

      about 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      It sounds like lymphatic cording (aka axillary web syndrome.) Do you see a visible "cord" at any point along your arm? I developed this and it took a lot of physical therapy to resolve. After 6 months I have regained 99% range of motion in that arm so I'm greatly relieved. Perhaps your oncologist can refer you to a P/T who has experience with mastectomy patients. It's a fairly common problem, I suspect.

      about 4 years ago
    • CountryGirl's Avatar
      CountryGirl

      I have Lymphedema also. Sometimes I can feel the joint pain even before my hand and arm starts to swell. Mostly I feel this in my knuckles someone is prying the bones apart. This is my warning signal. I the find a quiet place to run through my lymphadema routine to help push the fluid out of my arm. If it doesn't work, I wear my glove and sleeve for a few hours.

      Also, don't lie on that arm when sleeping.

      about 4 years ago
    • Benge's Avatar
      Benge

      I have the same thing and will be going to physical therapy next week.
      I found this on you tube that might help you too.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PmHuanqbAQ&list=PLDEF532905455E4CD&index=3

      about 4 years ago
    • Mel's Avatar
      Mel

      I had 3 nodes removed in April 2012 now and again I have trouble still. Matter of fact in past week or so can't extend arm all the way out like a vein is pulling or something, my armpit down to my elbow is sore and numb. to touch skin sometimes aches. Not hurt like I'm in pain but annoying.

      about 4 years ago
    • Clyde's Avatar
      Clyde

      I have some reaction after physoical activity or a sudden change of weather. But it always dissapates overnight or after a few easy exercises. Flexing my fist is the one that gets the best results. Try not to sleep on that ark or let it get static so the blood keeps flowing.

      about 4 years ago
    • Lgb's Avatar
      Lgb

      Thanks everyone. I see my surgeon tomorrow

      about 4 years ago
    • LeslieR's Avatar
      LeslieR

      Look into a condition called "cording" of the tendins. Like rubber bands, I had it after my mastectomy until my reconstruction surgery.

      about 4 years ago
    • Benge's Avatar
      Benge

      I saw my physical therapist and she explained it all to me. It's Axillary Web Syndrome and the doctors don't know for sure why some women gets it! I could not stretch my arm all the way anymore. She pulled on several cords and they popped. She will be doing that a couple of more times and gave me a lot of stretches to do. I can stretch my arm all the way now after just one treatment. It was painful, but so worth it! I wish they could have tested the lymph nodes a different way than taking them out. It messes up your lymph system and you have to watch the affected arm for the rest of your life that you don't get any infections.

      almost 4 years ago

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