• @BarryBoomer ... this is for you

    Asked by LiveWithCancer on Saturday, June 6, 2015

    @barryboomer ... this is for you

    Barry, you are always stating that there's been no progress in cancer treatments over the past decades. I just came across the following statement that should brighten your day (it did mine):

    "Today, two out of three people live at least five years after a cancer diagnosis, up from roughly one out of two in the 1970s."
    http://cancerprogress.net/timeline/major-milestones-against-cancer

    39 Answers from the Community

    39 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      They have made major strides, especially in the Breast Cancer fight. It's now a specialized field that is treated differently for each kind of cancer and it's variables. And each year, the treatments have improved. and women are living much longer, if the cancer is caught early. With the 3-D Mammogram, and other advances, the cancers are found much earlier, and can be treated aggressively to give each person a fighting chance against this beast. No, it's not an easy route to go through, with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, and then hormone blockers, but it gives women hope that they can beat this monster which invades women's bodies of all ages, races, religions, and social stature. Breast cancer 20 years ago was almost always a death sentence, but with the advancements made through research, women are getting through the treatments, and continuing their lives, as mothers, wives, and in the work force.
      I hope and pray that they can find out what really causes this disease, and they can eliminate it in my daughter or granddaughter's lives.

      about 6 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      clinda, thanks. However, I think that breast cancer 20 years ago was NOT "almost always a death sentence." More like 30 years ago, maybe. And thank you, LiveWithCancer, for your post. Best, Carool

      about 6 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have some questions about this? Are those statistics as good for men as they are for women? Particularly for breast cancer? The man I knew of friend of a friend, died of breast cancer. It is my opinion that we find as many ways to increase the instances of cancer as we find to cure it.

      about 6 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I'm sorry but 5 years has always been the "magic" number for tracking. The doctors became less and less interested in tracking me. At five years they simply stopped calling to make follow up appointments.

      That was 13 years ago.

      Cancer, in some part, has been upgraded to a chronic issue. I just do not understand why wellness isn't sought.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      These are overall statistics and are not related to breast cancer alone. Obviously, people are still dying from cancer. We have lost some here recently (AmyJo, MelanomaMama, Keith59 are three that i know of ... so sad). But overall, things are looking up. (The stats are provided by a respected organization, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO))

      I have spent a lot time on the ASCO.org site this afternoon. There is a lot of HOPE there.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Geekling, we all know that you are the exception. So glad you are still here 13 years later, despite the doctors who apparently tried to make that not be the case. I feel blessed that i, and most of us, have had much better experiences than you. I am sure i would be as resentful as you are if i had had similar experiences.

      As someone with stage IV lung cancer ... a very deadly disease, especially in late stage ... I couldn't be happier to have my cancer treated as a chronic disease. It is much preferred to the alternative of being dead.

      I don't understand why you and Barry insist that any stride made is not enough. I feel the opposite. Every stride that prolongs the life of a cancer survivor with great quality of life is a miracle and a blessing. I think MOST of us fighting this disease will take chronic disease over death while they search for cures. (By the way, there are tons of people here on WhatNext who are NED, which is the best most doctors will give you after a cancer diagnosis. That tells me that there ARE lots of cures going on.)

      about 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      I don't want to get into this anymore. Many live past 5 years but aren't really doing so good....but I guess you can say they are alive. I'm talking about REAL Change....Where is the Answer to the Problem. Living a few years longer or more living longer is great but it's not the FIX.....

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have a very good friend who is still alive after fighting 3 or 4 different cancers for 28 years. She is LIVING. Just went to DC for a weekend conference. Runs a support team. Active. Humorous. Look at Greg. He continues to beat cancer. This site is FULL of people who have survived many more than 5 years and they are living life to the fullest. Your belief is wrong.

      You need to go to some clean air site or something ... i am not sure what you expect here. Change is occurring every day for those of us who choose to trust doctors and treatments. .. exciting new discoveries every single day. Stats prove it. Somehow, you refuse to believe it.

      Just what IS this fix you are wanting, that you are advocating? I know a cure ... but how do we accomplish that? You aren't in favor of the huge medical strides ... or restated ... they aren't what you want to see ... what DO you want to see? What's going to be classified as progress for you? And how is it likely to be accomplished?

      about 6 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      There is no need to find a "cure" if the cause is already known.

      There also are other "cures" that are discounted by certain people.

      The people on this website, for the most part, chose the type of treatment they got and are glad of it because they know/knew no other way.

      The thing that Barry & I have in common is that we believe in other ways to wellness. Barry has chosen this path and you really need to let him do it by supporting him as you would anyone else who treats with the medicos.

      I got screwed by an insurer who thought its bottom line was more important than the lives of me and my Mother. Compounded, for me, is the fact that so many doctors thought I "looked so good" that a tumor was misdiagnosed as a wart for over a decade by a host of doctors, not just one. This was despite my requesting over and over that it be removed (I had not yet learned the word 'biopsy'). My request was refused. I was assured over and over that any surgery would only be cosmetic.

      When I finally got diagnosed I chose to NOT treat with any of these medicos. I was lied to in order to get me to treat (big buckaroos by this point).

      Not every fool with a medical degree has much of a brain. The AMA goes to amazing lengths to hide the fact that half of them were at the bottom of their class in school because they were unwilling or unable to learn. The ones who were at the top of their class, however, not only have ideas and compassion and ways to assist patients but are perfectly willing to listen to and try out new, sometimes radical, ideas.

      A great many of these new ideas are from folks who were, at first, considered radical.

      20 years ago eating plants instead of meat and potatoes was considered silly by many supposed experts. A healthy lifestyle was .. well, amazingly, there is still no medical definition for wellness.

      Wouldn't it be nice if surviving cancer did not mean mutilation and/or torturous treatments?
      At one time, electroshock therapy was considered dandy. George Washington died from doctors letting too much of his blood. There is no reason to settle into acceptance of horrors when life giving therapies are within reach.

      I have very good friends who do not have cancer at all. I have friends who have survived cancer without medical attentions. I want a brighter future for all of us with less pain, less, ill will, and freedom of choice without reprisal.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      You know, immunotherapy offers your "wouldn't it be nice if surviving cancer did not mean mutilation and/or torturous treatments "... and, if you followed what the medical community and pharmaceutical companies are doing, you would know that there have been many break-throughs in making the horrors of chemo more tolerable for many. (It doesn't work for everyone. It didn't for me. But, unfortunately, your diet stuff doesn't work for everyone either.)

      Your diet stuff is just wonderful for some people ... but as a late stage cancer patient, i will trust science rather than geekling or barry or chris beat cancer. I was called a liar by your esteemed colleague when i mentioned on one post that my blood tests have been perfect throughout this experience, including the time i spent receiving "torturous treatments." He said it couldn't be possible.

      Well, possible or not, it is the case. I ate food with faces and i didn't go overboard on the food that grows in the ground. I ate what i could eat and what sounded good to me. I am in no way saying a decent diet isn't important for everyone, cancer or no, but it isn't the end-all. I have read right here on WhatNext of newly diagnosed vegans ... oops ... their veggies didn't save them from getting cancer. (And, i couldn't be sadder that it DIDN'T work ... it would be just fabulous if we could simply eat better and avoid this disease, but it doesn't work that way.)

      You and Barry act like anyone who believes in and trusts science and doctors DOESN'T want everyone cured ... or for there to be no cancer at all. Which, i must say, is the most ridiculous assumption i have seen either of you come up with. I guarantee you that there is not a single individual here who doesn't dream and hope of a day when there is no more cancer.

      I have said before and i reiterate, i am sorry for your lousy experience. I am sorry it has made you into such a negative person, at least with regard to those of us who choose traditional treatments and toward those "fools with medical degrees." As i have also stated previously, i get sick of the attitude. YOU may have had a pitiful experience with those "fools without brains, but with medical degrees", but MINE has been fabulous.

      I am glad your diet has worked for you. And, i am glad medical science has worked for me. We are both still here! And THAT is something to celebrate, regardless of whether veggies or more traditional treatments made it possible. And I too dream of a "brighter future for all of us with less pain, less ill will, and freedom of choice without reprisal." Utopia, where are you???

      about 6 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Livewith Cancer:
      It isn't the fact that we are still alive after cancer treatments, it is the fact of our quality of life.
      I, like many others here have had multitude cancers, the types that I had called for surgery.
      Therefore I am pretty much scarred up & all over. Liveable, yes. Pretty, no.

      Then, right on the heels of my last cancer, came Rheumatoid Arthritis, which I truly believe was somehow connected to all the cancers & pre-cancers that I had just been thru. The "brilliant" medical minds, of course disagreed with me, but after all my experience with doctors, I respectfully disagree with them.
      I was in so much pain (much, much more than any cancer) and loss of mobility, that I foolishly agreed to a chemo/biological therapy treatment of Retuxin. (sp?) What a mistake!
      Now, my pain & mobility are worse. My lungs have some sort of problem that the specialists can't figure out.... I can't walk even a half a block without feeling like I've run a marathon.

      So, my experience with the medical community has not been good. I was lied to & cheated out of living the rest of my life without being miserable.That is not "Do no Harm" that all doctor are supposed to practice.

      Geekling & Barry
      I am not a vegetarian, but if diet works for anyone, if it helps you feel alive, them more power to you.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @Molly72, i am so sorry that you have had a miserable experience. With every story i hear where people are not happy for their treatments, that they would have preferred to have tried something other than traditional methods, i feel more blessed for my own experience.

      I have barely had to adjust to the "new normal" people talk about ... even though i am still in treatment and probably will be for the rest of my life, i am more active than ever. I run my dogs in agility (my MOST favorite activity of all time), started a vegetable and herb garden for the first time ever ... what fun that's been, walk miles nearly every day, visit friends .... oh my gosh, my life is so full and i am so happy that it is often difficult to contain my joy.

      I think that you might want to follow Barry and geekling and begin to research the diet-related cures. Maybe they will work better for you or at least provide you with a better quality of life than you currently have. Geekling, especially, has tons of information about fighting cancer with appropriate foods. She even has a book available that you can purchase. She can be very generous with offering tips here on WhatNext , too. BarryBoomer has lots of sites he can refer you to for more research, as well.

      There is no way for doctors to know how we are going to be impacted by treatments. I have been beyond blessed. I suffer from chemo brain (frustrating), but otherwise, i have no ill effects so far from my treatments.

      Definitely, no doctor has lied to me. I have been fully aware of the potential side effects from the drugs i have been given but i have had no lasting problems. I promise you the response i have had has been a BIG surprise to my doctors. My first oncologist didn't give me 6 months to live. My current oncologist tells me he is glad i am doing so well, but he isn't sure WHY that's the case. Me either! But, i know i thank God every single day that it IS the case!

      Hoping you find a way to live life without so much pain.

      about 6 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I am a person that has opted for radical treatment on both ends of the spectrum. And I have survived. And when it actually comes down to it I personally believe that it was simply the Will of God that I live. I did pray over the choices I made.
      My problem is the allocation of funds. I feel that research funds are mostly directed to profitable cures. I think marijuana research is greatly restricted because they haven't found a way to make it profitable.
      Also I believe we have created more things to cause cancer than we have found treatments for.
      There is very lax enforcement of environmental safety laws. I believe that geekling will agree with me on that,
      Then there is the personal choice of when treatment simply becomes more than the individual can bear. That is a moral choice which the individual must make and no one should condemn that choice.

      about 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      I don't know why this is even a discussion. I'm only doing what I'M doing and not encouraging anybody else to do it. BUT It might be a good idea to go Good Diet with treatments to give best results. I've opted for less time not just Survival but better short term life. I decided that at 70 I'm not looking for more time but just survival. The studies show that IF we catch a tumor before it spreads into the blood stream it's pretty beatable. The problem is when it's in the bloodstream it could be growing anywhere and that's not usually beatable. My cancer had already spread and am stage 4. It showed up by Pet Scan that lymph nodes lit up in my abdomen, spleen, under the arms, groin and neck. ONLY lots of chemo gave me any chance and also my cancer is an indolent form and there is NO cure for it. Of course it can change into a more aggressive form at any time (Ugh) so I have that to worry about. SO I am doing what I think is the least toxic and trying my best to stay alive as long as I can without symptoms. Except with nodes I can feel ( some in my neck are still there and one under my arm ) I still have no symptoms and it's been 21 months and I'm grateful for this extension of my life. BUT I don't want to be sick from the Treatments at this stage of my life and when or if the cancer starts giving me horrible pain or other symptoms I'll call in Hospice and Get ready to die. We are ALL going to die at some time and I'm ok with it. I've lived almost 70 amazing years and continue SO I'm ok with whatever happens. Beau Biden was only 46 and had the BEST of the BEST treatments and He is in Heaven....SO who knows what to do. I'm living everyday and doing the best I can. People contact me for some nutritional info and I send them to sites that I've found over the past year and a half. I'll give my ideas IF Asked and that's it. I talk a lot on my facebook page about nutrition....especially for our kids.....lots of problems there. I lament the lack of progress in the CURE department and It's my right to be upset. I believe in my heart that IF there wasn't so much group think and profit in the research and wall street companies they would probably have a cure already. Capitalism is Great but not in this field where there is a Major epidemic of cancer in our Country that is out of control. It's a national emergency but isn't being treated like it is. Too many parasites making money on this and I'm sick of it. SO....I still ask WHY and that's my right as a thinking person. IF people get angry at me for ME being angry SO BE IT.....I'm a big boy and can take it BUT my motives are pure......I want everybody to get better......

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @barryboomer ... I only posted the original information because you have stated that there has been no progress at all made in cancer treatment. I thought it might make you happy. I was obviously mistaken.

      I totally believe that your motives are pure and that you truly do care about others here.

      about 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      No progress in STOPPING the Cause....much killing and some stuff with the immune system BUT NO Stopping it....that's what I meant.....and it's true. We need some NEW Ideas and NOT SO Toxic.....the Drug Companies are a Business and they run the research and trials as a Business. I don't believe with an epidemic like this it should be Business as Usual......The Industry is a HUGE Business.....take it away from all of the wolves. A new idea and thrust must be found. It's insanity to keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome. The clinical trials are still using drugs. Where is the Cure not treatments. I believe the cure is out there but with a NEW IDEA....and just maybe the new idea can't be patented....ugh

      about 6 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      For my own situation, in 1978 the death rate for someone with Hodgkins was 90%. I was diagnosed in 88 and the death rate had dropped to 10%. That is progress that directly affects me. In 2008 when I was diagnosed with Head and Neck cancer, the protocol for treatment had been improved, for better outcomes. The surgical procedure that I had, wasn't even being done 20 years ago. Prior to 08 the survival prognosis for someone with my stage and type of cancer was less than 5 years, with most having a recurrence. That has been improved through research, and yes, trial and error. I am still here almost 7 years after due to research hospitals trying to find a better way. No, it's not perfect, there is no magic dust, (or magic cannibas) that can fix it all yet. For diet, I will eat at least 4 types of animals today, several plants, probably even eat a little dirt, and if I get down to the creek that runs past our property, I will kneel down and take a drink from it, without running it through a filter. I will swim in it with my nephews and nieces and have a blast. Afterwards I will ride my four wheeler as fast as I possibly can through it to get back home. Tomorrow, I will get on my motorcycle and ride to work and back home again, not worrying about the idiots that might run me over and kill me. You know (donorcycle). Each to their own, I am not going to sit around and wait for cancer to come after me again and not enjoy every stinking bit of life that I can squeeze in for the XX number of years I have left.

      As for quality of life, yes, I wake up every morning with something hurting, I wake up and have to go put my teeth in my mouth because the radiation killed my teeth, I wake up and have to rinse my mouth out with water because the radiation killed my saliva glands and I have a dry mouth all day, I wake up and have to wash everything down that I eat because I have no moisture in my mouth and terrible scar tissue in my throat and have trouble swallowing, I wake up and take a hand full of pills to keep me from having another stroke, because the treatments have damaged my arteries and veins, I wake up and have to have some warm coffee to get my voice working right because the radiation damaged my vocal chords..........................But, I WOKE UP!!! I get to kiss my sweet wife good morning, have breakfast, enjoy the hummingbirds on the plants and feeders outside and last night I had a BALL playing music with my friends. Didn't get home until 2 in the morning again.........but I got to do it. I'll take that no good sorry no 'count not worth living quality of life over the alternative...........NO LIFE. Each to their own is all I can say.

      I hope everyone on the site can find some way to enjoy the day as much as I am today. Best to you all!

      about 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      I'm very happy for you Greg and You do a great job with this site.
      Have a wonderful day. I'm watching the Rays at 4 PM and the NBA tonight and ALL IS GOOD.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @GregP_WN, I am soooooo glad that you are still wake up each morning, too!!!

      AND, the day you described that you'll be living today sounds like a day in Heaven to me!!! SO MUCH FUN!!!

      about 6 years ago
    • TXHills' Avatar
      TXHills

      I hope we can all remember, there is a difference between a fact and an opinion.
      That there have been major strides in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a fact, one that can be backed up with evidence.
      The ideas that chemotherapy is always a "horror show", or that people who choose conventional medical treatment are usually left debilitated, with a low quality of life, these are both opinions. No matter how strongly held they are, they are not facts.
      That the standard American diet is not as nutritious as it could be, and contains elements which can damage the body, to some extent, is a fact. That all cancers are caused by and can be cured with diet, is an opinion.
      We are each entitled to our opinions, and we each get to choose which treatments we prefer for our own bodies.
      There is a great deal yet to learn about science and cancer, including how to prevent it and how to cure it. The scientific method states that for something to become a fact, we need more than simply anecdotal evidence from the experiences of a few people. Their experience is meaningful to them, but in order for it to generalize into knowledge that can help others, it has to be repeatable and verifiable.
      Many scientists and doctors choose the field of cancer becaue they lost someone they love to the disease. To imagine that they are in collusion with each other, secretly hiding a cure or working against one, in order to make money off of cancer patients, does not seem reasonable to me. It is insulting to the men and women who have dedicated their lives to the task, and unnecessarily discouraging to those who rely on them for help and treatment.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Wow, @TXHills, what a wonderful post! Thank you!! You verbalized what I feel, but certainly couldn't put into words.

      about 6 years ago
    • TXHills' Avatar
      TXHills

      geekling, can you please explain what you mean when you state, "there is no need for a "cure" if the cause is already known'? Are you saying that the cause of all cancer is already known?

      about 6 years ago
    • TXHills' Avatar
      TXHills

      It is a false dichotomy to say that those who choose to utilize conventional therapy are not ""pursuing wellness". Of course we are. That's why we elected to undergo a particular treatment.
      We may also be eating healthier, doing yoga, getting massages and singing in a choir to boost our wellness. We are not just praying to the god of science and hoping for the best. Most of us have made changes to our lifestyle after cancer, to enhance our wellness. I daresay every person on this site is managing his or health, in consultation with the health professionals of their choice, in the way that makes the most sense for them.

      Some will have more success than others. Some will have a recurrence and others will not. But it will be the fault of cancer, or heart disease, not the person who has the disease. Our bodies are very complicated. There are dozens, if not hundreds of factors that can push a cell toward becoming cancerous, or that can turn it back to a more normal state. Sure, we could maybe do better in our exercise regimen or our diet, but that doesn't make us bad people, or deserving of ill health. Blaming the victim is never helpful.

      about 6 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Life is full of decisions and challenges.

      IMHO, it is now full of a bit more than 1/3rd to 1/2 of us can manage.

      I am 97.99% certain of how I got my cancer. My immune system was challenged., I was oxygen deprived. After the fact, a teeny bit of research showed that oxygen deprivation (long term exposure to toxic mold) can cause exactly the type of cancer I had. Bad air of limited oxygen (below what we need) strips the body of its own host defenses and destroys the immune system.

      Lack of oxygen and/or airborne pathogens can cause cancer, asthma, bronchitis and more. Corporations are formed with purpose but without ethical constraints. In a choice between withdrawing a poisonous substance or enhancing its own bottom line, the corporation can only and will only choose to enhance its bottom line unless and until its choice hurts the profits.

      Drinking water has only been fluoridated in the US for about 60+ years. It has proven to be problematic for humans but a boon for industry in that it is industrial waste (fertilizer industry) which is used in the drinking water. Because different folks drink different amounts of water, the fluorine dosage cannot be controlled and may often exceed recommended safe dosages. It lowers IQ, causes fluorisis (which begins as whiter areas or streaks on your teeth), can cause kidney and thyroid impairment, weaken bone structure and more. Portland voted to get rid of it recently but it will take another generation before any scientific "proofs" are available.`Then there are toxic dumps (accidental or purposeful) , oil spills and dispersants, nano sized plastic bits and drug remnants and so much more despoiling our life giving water. That GregP_WN has a stream out of which he can drink is fracking lucky.

      We no longer eat to remain healthy. Monoculture has (temporarily) ruined the soil and the plants do not get what they need to give us what we need when we eat. Or the food is genetically modified for no reason other than corporate control of the food supply. If you know the details of how the food is modified and why, I do believe any thinking person would cringe. There are 60-75 countries which either ban or label GMOs. The USA is not one of them. The science supporting them is flawed. Other countries have done research and found that much of the modifications are supportive of tumor development. In order to eat these frankenfoods, the body is forced to make poisons and/or store things with which it can't deal (fat).

      Iraq had very very little cancer until the US hit it with "depleted nuclear bombs". Cancer is everywhere there now, just as it is here. What the heck does "depleted" mean anyways? US police are now carrying bullets with depleted uranium heads.

      It took us less than 100 years to take cancer from an occasional trial to the plague it currently has become. I believe that industry is responsible for at least 70% of that increase.

      Other than clean air, clean food, and clean water, we need to move around. The kids who used to bicycle around delivering newspapers is now sitting in front of a screen developing apps. Work has become a 24/7 leash for far to many (who are lucky enough to actually be employed). Spirituality, being kind to each other, is also drowning in a sea of complacency and not my business.

      Immunotherapy was practiced by witches 1,000 years ago before they were burned at the stake. They used herbs of the fields. Nearly 50 years ago, a doctor named Bursinski (SP?) patented a form of immunotherapy which seemed to be working for his field. He was estopped from using his ideas which were supportive of the patient's own individual immune system. IMHO, it has taken all this time for industry to work around his theories to patent their own, non individualized therapies.

      If nothing else, doesn't anyone find it disconcerting that the same company which poisons the plants (pesticides) is involved in therapies to survive those poisonous effects? Merck, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and so forth up and down the line. Sure there are start ups and exceptions (thankfully) but, a whole lot of times, those little companies are either eaten up or bought out by the larger fish in the industries.

      Not everyone is left lucky by the ravages of therapy. Some are left with neuropathy which makes touch into a torture. Some are left with mutilation and missing parts. Some are unable to have intimate relations. Some are left with little quality of life. If you aren't, count yourself lucky but please do not disparage the pains and inabilities and torturous circumstances of others.

      When you've lost your job, the truck stopped running, the dog died, and the spouse left you because they couldn't take your pain any more...you simply can't be expected to smile, be optimistic, and look for the secret to joy in platitudes.

      about 6 years ago
    • TXHills' Avatar
      TXHills

      Of course I have losses from cancer. I have side effects and body scars, cognitive issues and daily pain and limitations. But I am alive and choose to emphasize that fact. We may not get to choose our circumstances, but we do get to choose our attitude, every moment.
      My decision to listen to science and have hope is in no way a disparagement to anyone.

      It occurs to me that cancer is generally a disease of aging. Not always. But the trend is there. For breast cancer, the biggest risk factor is being a woman, and the second is growing older. We are also living much, much longer than we were even a hundred years ago. That alone may be a contributor to any perceived increase in cancer rates.

      about 6 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      TXHills, I love what you said about facts vs. opinions! And what Greg and LiveWithCancer have posted. Thank you!

      about 6 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      TXHills, I love your definition of facts, and opinions. In my opinion "quality of life " is an opinion. Yet, I do have in my files I chart that claims to put a number on quality of life, in short those Percentages were presented as facts. Now is alive that is pretty much a verifiable fact. (politicians are the exception to this rule) The argument here seems to be "yes more people are surviving longer after cancer but their quality of life is less. Now unless we interview a statistically valid sample of those survivors, we cannot come close to making this statement a fact.
      As I read the article to me the major premise seem to be " Because of the MONEY spent on clinical trials the life of more individuals diagnosed with cancer has been five or more years. The articles does not even speculate if these $$$$$$ had been spent investigating alternate theories. And nothing was invested in finding a cure or causes. As I see it Barry wants a cure and Geekling wants to eliminate the causes. I would like to see all three but I'll take life extension.

      about 6 years ago
    • TXHills' Avatar
      TXHills

      Science and researchers are hard at work investigating the causes of different cancers, unraveling the mysteries of tumor suppressor genes, signaling pathways, oncogenes and so much more. Cancer has many causes, or triggers, which change a cell, in multiple stages, from normal to cancerous. Thus, there are many opportunities to interrupt that process, and even, in some cases, reverse it.
      Since there are so many processes that can lead to the development of cancer, I find it hard to imagine that there can be a single cure or a single way to prevent it. But we can hope.

      about 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @BoiseB, I suspect that there is not a single one of us who does not want a cure to cancer found. I do not believe there is a single cure, just like there is not a single cause.

      Likewise, in a utopian world, it would be lovely if the causes could be eliminated, but that is very unlikely. Cancer has been with us before GMO products, before the pollution we all live with, before people ate food that was so processed. So, while we might be able to reduce the incidences of cancer by doing the things that geekling suggests, we won't eliminate it. And, chances are good that we won't be doing away with pollution or the hazards of urban living anytime soon.

      Without clinical trials, there would be no new treatments. Why more people will not volunteer to participate in trials is beyond me. I thank God every single day that I am in the trial I am in. Not everyone has such a good response, but if people aren't willing to participate, medical science can go only so far. It has to move out of the laboratory. And, unfortunately, it costs a ton of money to bring a new treatment to the market.

      Funny, I read the article and never even noticed anything about money. I just saw great improvement in the number of cancer survivors over the last decades. Isn't it funny how perspective changes what you see?

      about 6 years ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I had a 50/50 chance of making it from diagnosis in 2008 to 2010. Having seven years now into this, I have experienced progress. Three relapses. 14 drugs in seven regimens. In the past 6 weeks, I have gone from two dozen tumors and lymphoma in my small intestine, all the way to clear CT and PET as of last Thursday. Stage IV to stage 0. I call that progress.

      At 62, when I am at treatment and see toddlers, pre-schoolers, elementary school aged children, teens, twenty-somethings, and young-to-middle-aged adults in treatment, I realize that I have nothing - nothing - to complain about.

      about 6 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      TX Hills:
      Maybe people don't participate in cancer trials because their doctors/hospital don't offer that option. They (the doctors) just don't want to be bothered or they don't care. Maybe they are too busy, who knows!

      One of my cancers was very rare, an Angiosarcoma, & I was unfortunate enough to be in a very large teaching hospital in MI. I did ask if there was a trial available. My question, along with most of my other questions, and requests was ignored. I had to be my own advocate for everything, nothing was suggested or offered. Even my basic nursing care was minimal. A medical trial would have be out of the question when I could'nt even get basic care.

      I think you have had much better care than the average cancer patient, and you have been quite lucky. Perhaps if I had had your experience, I would'nt have been quite so jaded in my views towards the medical profession!

      about 6 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      LiveWithCancer, I too feel that we will never be able to reverse the causes of cancer and many other diseases. Humans have been polluting the world for many centuries. In the last three centuries the pollution has increased exponentially. And we create more ways to kill ourselves (not just cancer but many other diseases) faster than we can find ways to survive those diseases. My great-grandparents (all of them lived well into their 90's two of them past 100) My grandmother was murdered in her 90's. My father lived to be 94 and my mother just celebrated her 94th birthday. I am 73 and I do not expect to see my 80th birthday.
      My son and I were discussing the fact that possibly we have reached the tipping point. I don't know. Maybe Barry and Geekling have some ideas.
      Unfortunately I did see money. And to me the survival numbers weren't that good. Over a period of 40 years (and billions of dollars) there was only a 15% increase in survival rate. I am not impressed. Those figures should have been at least 8 in 10.
      That being said I applaud every advance we can make.

      about 6 years ago
    • judyinflorida's Avatar
      judyinflorida

      Live with cancer has initiated an interesting topic. My blood work has always been good too, and I have no markers. Despite being examined quarterly after my hysterectomy and original diagnosis of stage I endometrial cancer, only an ultrasound led to my change of status 1 1/2 years later. That was done only because a DOCTOR listened to me when I said something was wrong, even though he couldn't find anything. By then I was stage IV. I've had chemo, I've had radiation and I've had surgery, but it keeps coming back. Now I'm on hormone therapy. Treatment has ruined my bones, but not my spirit. I am grateful for each period of time it has given me. If I had to eat really healthy I'd be unhappy. If I had to eat healthy and still died in the same period of time I'd be REALLY unhappy. I eat meat, chicken and fish, fruit, and some vegetables. I drink real coke even though I know it's not good for me, and I laugh a lot and often. Longevity runs in my family, but only on one side. This diagnosis was totally unexpected, but we all have an expiration date. God has given me the strength to fight and the peace to accept. I'm incredibly thankful for all I have been allowed to experience. It's great that people on this site share their experiences and opinions. It helps others and lets them know they are not alone. There's lots of room for debate, but no room for intolerance or ridicule. In the end we must all make our own decisions and we need to help support one another in every way we can.

      about 6 years ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013 (Best Answer!)

      Lung cancer statistics haven't changed in forty years EXCEPT for never smokers, whose mutations are studied, targeted and apparently the only lung cancer mutations the researchers have funding for as nothing has changed for those with a history of smoking.
      This is glaring proof of the stigma of tobacco use. Those 'who deserve lung cancer' vs 'those who don't'.

      over 5 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      Live, thanks!

      over 5 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @KB2013, I am sorry, but I disagree with you. The new immunotherapies work best on those who have a heavy smoking history. Opdivo has kept me alive since 7/2013. I had quite 5 or 6 years prior to diagnosis, but before that I was a very heavy smoker. (I can't even believe that now. Smoke makes me sick to my stomach and gives me a horrid headache now ... and I can smell a cigarette blocks away.)

      over 5 years ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      LiveWithCancer, you're right. I forgot about Opdivo. Glad to hear you've had positive result with it.

      over 5 years ago
    • dstranathan's Avatar
      dstranathan

      I was diagonosed with stage 4 lung cancer in June of 2009. When I searched life expectancy it said 6-12 months. After almost eight years thanks to targeted therapies and immunotherapy I am not only alive, but still mountain biking, hiking and taking bicycle spin classes.

      over 4 years ago
    • dstranathan's Avatar
      dstranathan

      @KB2013 I was a former smoker and have been stable on Opdivo for a year now. Genencech also just got approval on a new immunotherapy on October 19th Tecentriq that works on non-small cell lung cancer with or without expression on PD-L1. I also just read an article that Huntsman Cancer Center in Utah is studying a new small cell tumor subgroup C-MYC. Small Cell is usually from smoking or exposure to second hand smoke. I also have a friend with small cell lung cancer in the AZD4736 immunotherapy trial that has been stable for over a year. My girlfriend passed from small cell lung cancer in January of 2014 so always excited to see progress being made.

      over 4 years ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more adenocarcinoma, lung cancer questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Adenocarcinoma, Lung Cancer page.