• Came across a book that sounds like it might be a good read, especially for people with kids

    Asked by LiveWithCancer on Sunday, August 19, 2018

    Came across a book that sounds like it might be a good read, especially for people with kids

    Napkin Notes: Make Lunch Meaningful, Life Will Follow by W. Garth Callaghan.

    Here's part of the write-up on it from Amazon's Web site:

    Garth Callaghan doesn’t know how long he has to live. But he can be certain of one simple thing: No matter his fate, his daughter, Emma, will find a handwritten note inside her lunchbox each day until she graduates from high school.

    Cancer has given Garth Callaghan a new purpose: to inspire parents to connect more with their children even in small ways, as he has done before and since his diagnosis by tucking a napkin note into his daughter’s lunch every day.

    Every morning as he packs Emma’s lunch, Garth adds a little surprise: a “napkin note”—a short, tender message to convey his love, encouragement, and pride. Garth began writing his napkin notes when Emma was in grade school, and as she grew up, his notes became more meaningful.

    https://www.amazon.com/Napkin-Notes-Lunch-Meaningful-Follow-ebook/dp/B00JDKBU16

    4 Answers from the Community

    4 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I haven't read the book. It just came through my BookBub today and it sounded like it might be good.

      3 months ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      I just read the Look Inside portion. It looks like a great book. I added it to my wishlist for shopping later. Because of the rarity and aggressiveness of my husband's cancer, I have already bought a couple of books dealing with post death grief for our grandchildren. The way that hubby's oncologist explained his cancer, we thought this was just buying time. Instead he's 3 years post treatment and stable. He may outlive me! They have dealt with the death of goldfish and hermit crabs and handled it as part of the cycle of life but not a person close to them. My daughter chooses not to discuss death with them even though they are 8 and 10. It's not that I want her tell them that grandpa is going to die someday. They have seen him sick many times and he's had a stroke so they know about that.I don't know what's right and she's doing what's right for her kids. She knows them best.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @Paperpusher, when I was diagnosed, my grandkids were 4 and 6, maybe. I'll never forget the youngest one, who couldn't possibly truly understand the concept, asking me if I was going to die. It was really bothering him a lot. I should have thought to get him a book or something to explain it if I did die. I think as years have passed, no one worries as much about it.

      I read the comments by people when deciding if I want to invest in a book (I usually buy Kindle so they are pretty cheap most of the time). I think there were only one or two negative reviews of this book, which is pretty unusual.

      3 months ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      @ LiveWithCancer Hubby was diagnosed in Dec, 2013 so the kids were considerably younger and it was right before Christmas with his surgery right after Christmas. The drs chose not to treat him then and it came back in less than a year. Right now hubby is doing well other than getting SOB very easily so we don't talk about it and I've put the books away. They knew grandpa was sick but not how close to death he came during treatment.
      I also read the comments. The books I chose were non-religious since we and my daughter don't prescribe to any particular faith.

      3 months ago

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