• Change of diet question...

    Asked by Alyce on Saturday, December 15, 2012

    Change of diet question...

    When I was diagnosed with breast cancer last spring (2012), I immediately changed my diet. No pies, cakes, candies, ice cream, pop, etc., no meat that contained hormones/steroids, like wise with our dairy products. Dropped sugar out of the equation, did juicing to increase my intake of nutrients, no processed foods (if it came in a box or a package (frozen or shelf stable), I did not eat it and I also worked with my nutritionist to make sure my body was getting the proper nutrients. By the end of chemo (July 31), my weight had dropped about 15 pounds, the surgeon could no longer find my lump, through physical exam, sonogram, etc. Whereas before, it was 4.5 cm, very very hard gel like consistancy. She did a lumpectomy, instead of her planned mastectomy, had a difficult time finding cancer cells. She asked to go in a 2nd time because she was not confident that she had removed all cells. Has anyone else had a tumor shrink like this? If so, what did you do?

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • dealite2007's Avatar
      dealite2007

      You didn't say anything about having chemo....so that isn't what made the tumor shrink. Diet does have something to do with it and so does exercise, but not everything. I wouldn't be surprised if your onc wants you on a hormone therapy i.e., tamoxifen. That is such good news.

      almost 8 years ago
    • dealite2007's Avatar
      dealite2007

      A very good book which addresses how cancer cells work, what feeds them, and what makes a hostile environment for the. It's an excellent source for diet, nutrition and exercise. It is "Life Over Cancer."

      almost 8 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Actually Deelite, she did mention chemo (completed on July 31) and it was at that point that her surgeon could no longer find a lump. Having taught nutrition, I think diet is extremely important to one's overall health, but it does not cause tumor's to shrink.

      almost 8 years ago

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