• Chemo and swimming pool

    Asked by DebbieK on Wednesday, February 6, 2019

    Chemo and swimming pool

    13 Answers from the Community

    13 answers
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Hello, I'm an oncology nurse and maybe I can help with this. As a nurse I usually advise against it because your immune system is compromised while on treatment and there could be germs in the water. It is also not safe with a port because any germ in the pool can use your port as a place of entry into your bloodstream. I hope this answers your question. Best of luck to you.

      9 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I swim rather frequently in the summer. I have a port and have been in treatment since 2012. No doctor has told me to avoid swimming though i am not sure if i ever asked for permission.

      9 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      I have my 2nd port and have my own pool, so my Drs have known that I swim all summer. I do not use a public pool, I like having control of the chemicals. Be sure to wear sunscreen and protective hat and shirt. Will be asking my medical team about swimming and port.

      9 months ago
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      When I was going through chemo in the summer of 2013, I couldn't stand the tought of not swimming, especially since I live in Florida where it's very hot mowst of the year. My nurse told me it was OK to swim as long as I floated in an inflatable ring. That would keep my port above water level, and it was good in case I got tired. We had a lakeside picnic with baptisms at my church that summer, and I was very careful to stay in my ring at all times when in the water. I also wore a cloth hat that tied on so my baby fuzz head wasn't exposed either. I hope this helps you know if you should swim on chemo. HUGS and God bless.

      9 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I was told not to use the health club pools because of germs. And then I asked during radiation and the answer was no. Because the chemicals could hurt my delicate skin. So four six months I couldn't swim, which made me very sad. And then the doctor said I needed more exercise. I said you took my pools away. Made no sense to me.

      9 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have heard of doctors suggesting that we stay out of natural rivers, creeks, or ponds while on chemo because of the likelihood of that type of water containing too many things that may infect you.

      9 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Especially right after your port had been recently accessed.

      9 months ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      I was told that I should not swim in lakes or rivers. Pool was ok, hot tub, no

      9 months ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      I was told no unless I had my own pool which I do not. No lake & no public pools. I was on strong chemo & did have issues with WBC though.

      9 months ago
    • Maryflier's Avatar
      Maryflier

      I was told not to swim in public pools, lakes or the ocean while on chemo.

      9 months ago
    • Gumpus61's Avatar
      Gumpus61

      My guess is a lot more people get infected by visiting a Hospital than going for a swim. Common sense should prevail.

      9 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I had a treatment today. I asked my chemo nurse if I should avoid swimming pools and/or whether I needed to worry about my port. She said no to both. (We take showers or baths ... swimming pools have all kinds of chemicals to kill bad stuff ... )

      I don't tend to worry about much ... and I don't tend to ask permission before enjoying an activity. Of course, my blood levels have never tanked so I don't have as much worry about infections, etc. as some cancer patients do.

      9 months ago
    • DebbieK's Avatar
      DebbieK

      So I’ve come along way since February 6. I’ve had a lumpectomy. I am scheduled next week to have my port inserted. My chemo doctor has told me it is OK for me to go in the pool. Doesn’t matter if it a public pool.

      8 months ago

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