• Chemo to begin soon

    Asked by Kathy on Monday, October 15, 2012

    Chemo to begin soon

    I am dealing with ovarian cancer second time around three years later. New for me this time is that we are going to do IP chemo. I am so very nervous as I venture on to another unknown. VERY NERVOUS. I will be starting this on Oct 23. Any words of encouragement will be so appreciated. Thank you so much. I am very new to this specific website - but it's kinda neat, isn't it?

    18 Answers from the Community

    18 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Thanks for being here Kathy, sorry your having to strike out again on this journey. I have been down this road 3 times, last one was 4 years ago. Just get it over with and you'll be done again.

      Someone will come along with an answer for you about that type of chemo.

      Let us know if you need anything.

      Greg P
      3X Survivor
      Team WhatNext
      Community Mgr

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Sending you virtual hugs and healing. I am currently being treated for two active cancers (Advanced Kidney & Metastasized Trip Neg Breast). It doesn't get any easier. The site is neat, and offers lots of support, just knowing we are not alone helps a lot. I truly believe that if cancer can not be cured in our life time, it can be treated as a chronic condition, much like diabetes. In the 3+ years since my advanced kidney diagnoses I have been treated with drugs that virtually just came on the market (one was approved by the FDA the week before I started it), which have kept the cancer stable. I am now in the process of have "bleeding edge" genetic testing done to help treat both my cancers, based on markers and mutations (the breast cancer turned up on a scan this past April).

      over 4 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      Attitude is EVERYTHING!!! Remember, you're stronger than you know. This is just a small bump is the road. Keep your chin up. This will be over before you know it. I'll be praying for you.

      over 4 years ago
    • SpunkyS's Avatar
      SpunkyS

      Kathy,
      Praying for you as you begin this next round. I can't imagine IP treatment. I know it may be an option when my Ovarian returns.
      I read this recently and it made me laugh hard. Hope you do too. MD to chemo pt just before treatment.: How are you today? Pt. Fine. But I am sure you will take care of that shortly.

      Here if you need to vent. Sending hugs and admiration.

      over 4 years ago
    • teddyfuzz's Avatar
      teddyfuzz

      If I were in charge, nobody would ever get cancer twice. Once is quite enough. I'm so sorry that you are having to deal with this beast yet again. Apparently it didn't get the message the first time. I am praying that you pound this thing so far into submission that it doesn't even THINK about coming back. By the time you are done, this cancer is going to be so scared that word will be out on the street..."YOU EFF WITH KATHY, YOU DIE!". I will be sending positive thoughts your way as you kick some cellular a$$. ***BIG HUG***

      over 4 years ago
    • msfullofhope's Avatar
      msfullofhope

      Hi Kathy
      Remind yourself that you are a survivor! You have strengths and reserves that you did not even though were there. See yourself as a "healthy being" that won't be beat!

      Sending healing energy your way!

      over 4 years ago
    • CakeLady's Avatar
      CakeLady

      Prayers and hugs coming your way. Good luck as you start this journey.

      over 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm (Best Answer!)

      Kathy, hello fellow Illinoisian, I live in Niles. My name is Carm and I am an oncology/end of life nurse. I specialize in gyne cancers. I understand your apprehension in regards to Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (IPC), but lets see if I can help you understand the benefits of it. The idea of IPC is really based on some very sturdy principals. First, ovarian cancer usually remains within the peritoneal cavity in most women for the majority of its natural history. Second, this cancer grows on on the surface of the peritoneal lining, rather than directly invading organs and tissues. Third is that the drug absorption from the peritoneal cavity is largely by way of the portal circulation (liver) instead of thru the circulating blood. The advantage is that more drug is delivered than would be if it had to go thru the blood stream. It avoids that first pass where some of the drug is absorbed elsewhere and gets to the major problem areas with a fuller potency. Are there side effects to this therapy? Of course anything you add to the peritoneal cavity is going to create a sensitivity reaction. A tummy ache is usual, lets face it, you are putting a strong dose in a sensitive area, so it will react. Usually the chemo is dose limiting, and so the side effects that might accompany the treatment depends on which chemo is used. I do not know which drug your oncologist will use, but as an example, IPC Cisplatin can cause vomiting, neurotoxicity and possibly some kidney sensitivities, whereas IPC Carboplatin side effect are usually bone marrow suppression which would result in low blood counts. However, for chemo associated with local toxicity like paclitaxel (Taxol), Mitoxantrone, doxirubicin (Adriamycin), and Mitomycin C, systemic side effects you would normally see in administration via the blood is not apparent in IPC. There is a wonderful website called the chemotherapy advisor at chemotherapyadvisor.com and it can really help you understand the treatments offered for your cancer. On the right of the home page half way down is the regimens for each type of cancer. I direct all my patients to the site and they have found it extremely useful. It is free to join. I hope I have cleared up some of your concerns and if you need more info, I am always here to respond whether thru this site or on private email or phone. You need not go thru this fear alone. There are many woinderful and knowledgeable patients here who can help guide you thru this new path of your journey, their input is so valuable. Best of luck to you, Carm.

      over 4 years ago
    • Kathy's Avatar
      Kathy

      I am feeling so blessed to have come across this website. For me navigating it seems a little tricky. I want to be sure to thank all of you for every response.

      over 4 years ago
    • mgm48's Avatar
      mgm48

      My doctors told me "everyone is different" and boy were they right . I kept a daily update on What Next for my first cycle. I was always wondering when the next side effect would show up. For me they never did. I exercised (primarily bicycle riding) strenuously through out the chemo and continue today while on "Holiday." I keep a positive attitude. And that helps. I think you'll find some of the most caring and kind people on earth when you meet your oncology nurses. Ask them for anything and they will jump over mountains to help you. Look at this as a life experience, make the most of it. It is part of your healing. Also know many have been there before you and we are all pulling, praying and hoping for you.

      Keep it positive and smile :)

      over 4 years ago
    • Darlie's Avatar
      Darlie

      I to had IP chemo, not that bad, no worst then traditional chemo I do know that when you walk out of chemo you feel about 9 months pregnant but goes down quick, I just waddled out of chemo that day I was also getting traditional chemo. at the same . Double hit. but I survived and you will too this will soon be behind you. God Bless fight fight fight.

      over 4 years ago
    • moonbeam's Avatar
      moonbeam

      Nancy 2012 Yes, this website is neat! Doesn't make you feel so alone. Kathy, I don't really have any great advise, but I can imagine how you feel. I too, was dx with ovarian ca stage IV just 3 yrs ago and, with Gods help and great dr's, I am in remission......sounds kind of like you.....lately, it seems I have been wondering how I will handle the second time around. My ca125 seems to be resing, last visit it was at 23. In the past, it seemed to hover always low to mid teens. Anyway,I see my oncologist tomorrow . We'll see.

      over 4 years ago
    • moonbeam's Avatar
      moonbeam

      Nancy 2012 To Kathy. Yes, this website is neat! Doesn't make you feel so alone. Kathy, I don't really have any great advise, but I can imagine how you feel. I too, was dx with ovarian ca stage IV just 4 yrs ago and, with Gods help and great dr's, I am in remission 3 yrs this month....sounds kind of like you.....lately, it seems I have been wondering how I will handle the second time around. My ca125 seems to be rising, last visit it was at 23. In the past, it seemed to hover always low to mid teens. Anyway,I see my oncologist tomorrow . We'll see.

      I guess the best answer for you is take it One day at a time. Don't try to compare this time to the first time. I think that is a big downside to the second time around, you tend to anticipate, especially the bad memories etc. Can't help it. But remember to include the good memories, best of all, you were in remission for 3 yrs. It happened last time and it will happen again. Please keep your mind in the positive. I think that means so much to recovery. Your glass is half full.....keep it that way. Peace and love to you, Nancy

      over 4 years ago
    • jdada's Avatar
      jdada

      I had this type of treatment last year. I think this is what helped to get me in remission. I am sorry you are having to go through this but like someone else said just get it over with. I had the IV chem treatment for 24 hours then the IP treatment then went home. I had dehydration issues with it but, they gave me fluids and that helped. Sending you prayers and hugs.

      over 4 years ago
    • jdada's Avatar
      jdada

      I had this treatment last year and I think it had alot to do with my remission. I had dehydration issues with it but, they gave me fluids and that helped alot. Hang in there, it will be over before you know it. You are a fighter and will do fine with this treatment. Sending you prayer and hugs.

      over 4 years ago
    • Pheonix's Avatar
      Pheonix

      Hi Kathy,
      My response is a little late. Website trouble. But I want to share my experience with you. I ha d IP chemo along with conventional IV chemo every 21 days for 4 months. I'm not going to tell its easy or without any side effects cause there are & at times it's hard. But you can get
      through it, I'm thankful I did. You may need to be hydrated after the treatments, I needed fluids for a few hours for two days afterward. Most important I think was the positive visualization I associated with the treatment. I would visualize the fluid killing any malignant cells that may be lingering.

      over 4 years ago
    • jenpwrs' Avatar
      jenpwrs

      Hi Kathy. I've had IP chemo several times. I've also had 6 years of traditional chemo. I think the IP is easier, but I was hospitalized when mine was given. Perhaps that made it easier because I wasn't tempted to get up and do things. Overall, I think it is very do-able. Best of all, from what I read, it is very effective. Knowing that you are getting such a state-of-the art treatment always helps me mentally. Remember others have gotten through this, so that means that you can too. I've not been able to do much this last year, but I've noticed that having simple things to keep my mind busy helps tremendously. I've always been a reader, but lately I am addicted to audiobooks-easier when I'm tired. Just remember to reach out when you need to.

      over 4 years ago
    • Kathy's Avatar
      Kathy

      Thank you so much for all of the responses on here. They are so helpful and meaningful coming from people who have been there. It's been hard waiting - it's not like something to look forward to. I hope the side effects can be manageable so my life can have some enjoyment while going thru the treatments.

      over 4 years ago

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