• Diet

    Asked by Jeannielee on Friday, July 20, 2018

    Diet

    My husband no longer wants to eat veggies which he loved prior to chemo. Same with meats. Is this due to treatment? He had bariatric bypass last August, then viral diarreah in December followed by c-diff in April. While in the hospital they discovered the lymphoma. He’s emaciated now.

    13 Answers from the Community

    13 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Sometimes the treatments take taste away or give a metallic taste. What DOES he eat. How tall and what does he weigh? The Bypass may have done something. Did he do that to lose weight? Confused.

      5 months ago
    • biga17133's Avatar
      biga17133

      @Jeannielee so sorry for your DX and will be praying for you ..

      Now the first thing I will say is He HAS TO EAT HAS TO !!!, eating is very important getting emaciated is not good for him or the body you need minerals and vitamins and protein to help this tho I know very little to nothing about Follicular lymphoma not eating is not going to help matters, so find something maybe fruit, peaches seem to be my go to when I'm not wanting anything it 's more then likely taste and little depression (I'm guessing here) that's making him not want to eat if its taste, just do like a lot of us do shop around try this or that till you find a winner to eat or to Substitute like bread for crackers or steak for chicken I my self hate bread now but I can take a biscuit and hollow it out and put a scrabbled egg not fried cuz now I hate fried eggs and eat it ,also the way it is cook makes me say nay or yay , if it's depression then the doctor can help there I bucked for awhile till my sister said what do you have to lose trying the pills and I'm glad I did help a lot didn't even know I was depressed, but eating habits have got to change fast so he can beat this and get back to who he once was so EAT EAT EAT please my friend ,,praying for you and him, still taking a bath by myself biga17133

      5 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Cancer patients HAVE to eat to survive. After all that he has gone through, he is probably depressed, despondent and discouraged. Plus treatments change his taste buds.

      What has his medical team said about his weight? Surely, they are distressed. I would suggest that you ask for a referral to a registered oncology nutritionist who can give the two of specific foods to eat, directions on how to make protein rich smoothies (easy to drink) plus other ideas of how to get back to eating again. Best wishes - remember that eating is not optional. He has to eat to survive.

      5 months ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      How about delicious Fruit/Veggie/Nut Smoothies. Get a Bullet.....Put a banana in and make it sweeter with stevia. Just make it taste really good.

      5 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      If I may, I would like to suggest a juicer. Start with 3 ribs of celery and 1 cucumber. Add a small bunch or either parsley or mint.

      He will be able to hold the juice down and it will remineralize him to an extent. Sometimes dehydration is as much a problem as anything else and it is so easy to fix.

      It is my belief that, as you describe him, he needs to stick with juices for a time. Try not to mix more than 3 items along with an herb. Juice will not only keep him hydrated but will supply nutrition without forcing him to use energy needed to rout cancer in digestion efforts.

      In time, you can add pulp back in and do as is needed to address, and to strengthen him.

      Best wishes

      5 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I had such a hard time eating fruits and veggies after months of chemo. It took me months to start eating healthy.

      5 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      During my 1st cancer I was on a feeding tube for six months. During that time I watched the Foodnetwork channel from the time it came on until the time it signed off. Almost all the chefs had some variation of this statement "The first bite you take is with your eyes" One thing you need to do is engage your husband in the food preparation like chopping the vegetables Try to make food as appealing as possible. Colorful vegetables have the most nutrients. Try to engage your husband in planning. Find a new recipe to try each week. Be prepared to throw it out if it is not yummy, but try something new. Also talk to his Dr. about diet get a referral to a dietition who is a specialist in cancer treatments.

      5 months ago
    • macfightsback's Avatar
      macfightsback

      Consulting an oncology nutritionist may be helpful. I was very malnourished on initial diagnosis and the oncology nutritionist helped me develop a person eating plan based on foods I liked. It worked. Good nutrition is vital for all of us but especially when we are recovering from cancer. His poor wt. Is worrisome. People don't do well if they are malnourished and/or underweight recovering from cancer.

      5 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I agree with @macfightsback. My clinic has a dietician. She is free of charge and WANTS to help.

      At this point, if he will eat, whatever he will eat, let him eat it. My radiation oncologist studies "wasting away" disease because he believes it is more deadly than the cancer that seems to cause it. That makes you really realize how important it is to get some food in him ... healthy food would be best, but calories are good.

      My husband had quadruple bypass surgery. He completely lost his desire to eat. He could go days without a bite of any kind of food. They prescribed something to make him hungry. (He wouldn't take it so I don't know if it actually works or not, but you might ask his oncologist about that, too.)

      Good luck!! It is very difficult to eat when you feel no hunger ... or when you feel worse after you eat ... or when nothing sounds good.

      5 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Just an FYI, no one who has responded to you so far is a nutritionist nor a doctor nor a dietician. We are each giving you our personal opinions and basing what we say upon our beliefs, our ideologies, and our experiences.

      Best of luck!! I hope you can figure something out to help him begin to eat again.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Have you discussed this in detail with his doctor to get to the bottom of WHY he won't eat? There are prescriptions to prevent nausea or digestive problems from reflux, or he may need an appetite stimulant. If he has a bad taste due to chemo, the doctor or a dietitian can advise on that.

      If he's really emaciated, he might benefit from a feeding tube because he needs nutrients to fight cancer.

      In the meantime, buy some Boost nutritional drinks (High Protein is 20 grams) and see if he likes them. You could try putting them in a blender and adding fruits to make a smoothie. If he likes milk, get Carnation Breakfast Essentials powder to mix with it. Best wishes.

      5 months ago
    • kicks' Avatar
      kicks

      I am very new to lymphoma, but I had a bariatric surgery 6 years ago. He should definitely talk to a nutritionist. If it were me, I'd cross reference any info with my bariatric team. They may have some additional suggestions, like protein drinks, yogurt, etc. Since so many bypass recipients get dumping he will probably want to avoid the extra sugars. The nutritionist should be able to give him some ideas. Also, the vitamins are so critical for him due to malabsorption with the bypass. Sending positive thoughts!

      4 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      If he's already emaciated, please call a doctor first. They can put a feeding tube in immediately and get him healthier faster. If he wants to eat, he can also eat normally having a feeding tube. They can remove it easily whenever it needs to go.

      4 months ago

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