• Do you find that when you're talking to a friend or family member about the risks of cancer that they don't get it?

    Asked by MelMom on Tuesday, February 7, 2017

    Do you find that when you're talking to a friend or family member about the risks of cancer that they don't get it?

    It seems like I'm talking to a tree, maybe they are tired of hearing it, but it's just simple facts that more than half of the public will get diagnosed at some point. Everyone just has the attitude that "other" people get cancer, not them.

    10 Answers from the Community

    10 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I find it very interesting that when I post on Facebook, I often get many comments about politics, my dogs, flowers, etc. But, when I post anything about the dangers of cancer, it is as if I posted only to myself.

      I guess no one wants to think about it. But, sadly, many of them will hear those life-changing words someday, "you've got cancer." It will get real quickly then.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      One can only hope that talking about the risks of cancer does not cause it in any way and that nobody gets it from such activity is a good thing .......

      Seriously, everyone is in the dark about cancer. The cancer money vacuum gimme gimme associations talk about cures - not causes. People simply feel they are powerless so they dont want to talk about falling ill as though it is a lottery system as in the Hunger Games.

      Personally, I believe it is the shortsightedness of corporations, which bear no responsibility, which is killing folks.

      My water has nuclear waste in it and the remnants of drugs you took and chemicals some company put in my food or clothing or shelter. The winds carry air from damaged nuclear reactors, bacteria from herds of pigs kept on concentrated miles of land, methane, oil, gas, chemicals of which I'd not ever heard and the chemtrails (much longer lasting than contrails) darken the skies with cloud like straight lines.

      My food has been genetically modified but not for my pleasure or benefit and sprayed with poisons I surely am unable to stand against and

      I have been mistrained to deny myself proper sustenence so that a few greedy men can take extra profit from weakening me.

      So yes. No one wants to talk about cancer because they dont know how to avoid it, feel like sitting ducks, and want a few more moments of freedom from worry instead to talking about something over which they believe they have no control.

      Can you blame them?

      almost 4 years ago
    • banditwalker's Avatar
      banditwalker

      A girl told me that she heard I had breast cancer and started telling me about her mother and aunt who all had it and are doing fine now. But, she refuses to get tested. I see her often and I just know one of these days I will find out she has been diagnosed. In denial? Maybe.

      almost 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I see both sides of this, some don't want to talk about it, don't want to know about it, and have told me even if they had it, they wouldn't want to know. Then, there are those who want to know about it, how to stay away from it, and want to help others. It's kind of like a Pepsi/Coke or Ford/Chevy thing.

      almost 4 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      You know, Greg, reading your response reminds me of my younger years. I had resolved that I would never do chemo after watching how it affected my dad for the 6 months he lived after his lung cancer diagnosis. Even though he died from lung cancer, I kept right on smoking away.

      I knew I was probably going to have cancer someday. But I said I didn't want to know about it so I would not be faced with making a treatment decision. In my stupidity, I just wanted to "wake up dead" from it ... never suffering from treatment (which we all know can temporarily be as bad or worse than the disease).

      That attitude changed completely when the doctor felt the knot and the whirlwind of cancer diagnosis happened. I was scared of chemo, but I never considered not taking advantage of the only option available to me.

      almost 4 years ago
    • anniemk's Avatar
      anniemk

      I sure can relate to the posted comments, I'll add two thoughts. After my CLL diagnosis I became the 'encyclopedia of cancer' to my inlaws. I needed them to feel empathy for me and be supportive when in fact all they did was badger me with questions. When I started a new targeted therapy they thought it was some voodoo medicine I'd been offered. Oh well, each to their own!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Carolina105's Avatar
      Carolina105

      You don't "get it" until it happens to you. You can talk to family & friends all you want, but until they are diagnoised with cancer themselves they really don't get it. After my PLL diagnois I told very few people, didn't post it on social media,etc. It didn't take long to realize I needed to lower my expectations of family & friends. They did not have a clue how I felt, which can be a lonely feeling.

      almost 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      @Live, I have seen several people that talked the big talk of "I will never take that poison, or it's the treatment that kills you, not the cancer"! But they tend to change that attitude when they are told that they could die within xx months without treatment. That's why I want to hear from people's personal experience, not what I heard she said that her brothers third cousins wifes niece that had it and she died.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I walked away but you already know that GregP_WN. I was thrown back down the chute with more lies and other demeaning tales of fairies

      almost 4 years ago
    • GailB's Avatar
      GailB

      They just don't get it and they say what they would or would not do....when in reality no one knows what they will or will not do to stay alive not even those of us that already have cancer....until your back is against the wall and your options are limited...you will do the things you thought you would not. So yeah the treatment can kill you or cause other problems but dead is dead if you do nothing and as long as you are still here you still have hope. I never thought I would do a stem cell transplant for CLL but when you are on the last known drug and your remissions are very short.....do you just wait and hope they have a new drug that works differently than the ones you have already tired or do you roll the dice and do a Stem Cell Transplant......my brother is a perfect match so it is a little less risky for me but if I wait he may not be available to me.....even though we have a big family history of cancer(CLL is nothing compared to the other cancers both sides of our family has had)heart disease and diabetes....he's one of those he's not going to get sick....heavy smoker, drink and unhealthy eating habits, over weight.....I don't get our family we are currently watching 2 cousins and a sister dying from cancer.....and none of them get it. They just proved that the breast cancer is hereditary but they don't want to be test because so far everyone that has been tested does have the gene(not surprising....took all of the women in my grandmothers generation and has taken all but 2 in my mothers generation and they have the gene and is now working thru my generation)....they won't even go and get the preventive care they need.....it has gotten every age group 20.30.40.50.60.70 in our family no one is safe but they don't get it.....I thought I would never do a trial and never a phase 1 and especially never be the 3rd person to do it.....but guess what next week I will get genetically reengineered cells from an umbilical cord and the 1st person just did it about 6wks ago. and the second did it last week during Hurricane Harvey. this is plan C and if it doesn't work I can go back and do plan B(SCT) I do know that there will come a time when my choices will be different but since I am only 60 I would like to get another 10 years at least but if I was 75 I might be only wanting another few years but who knows, have to wait until I get there.

      about 3 years ago

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