• , Does anyone know if , after having a lumpectomy with clear margins.in Nov 5th 2012. then Dec 2012 lymph node surgery.(Clear)

    Asked by pulley on Saturday, February 9, 2013

    , Does anyone know if , after having a lumpectomy with clear margins.in Nov 5th 2012. then Dec 2012 lymph node surgery.(Clear)

    Through an error waiting still to get Radiation. They were waiting on the test to see what number, to determine if Chemo or Radiation. Number turned out to be 18. I still do not have a plan in place, My concern is what if there were a few of those ugly little cells there start growing in this long period of time? My dx is Invasive Lobular carcinoma.Pos er pos pr Her neg.
    Does anyone know if this is possible, please let me know.

    2 Answers from the Community

    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I'm not real clear on what you question is. Unless you were stage 4 with remote metastasis, if you had clear margins with tumor removal and sentinel node dissection indicated no malignancy, then at this point you would not have any evidence of disease and are in remission. Based on your oncotype score, chemo and/or radiation may or may not be recommended to lower the risk of recurrence. Anyone can get a recurrence regardless of the risk factors and they can get it a year or two after initial treatment or many years later. But it is not going to be fact within weeks or even a few months after primary treatment (surgery)..

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I waited 3 months from the time I had my lumpectomy for 1 CM TNBC tumor, large clear margins, no lymph nodes involved, till I started radiation treatment. My team want to make sure I was healed enough before they begun the treatment.

      over 4 years ago

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