• Doesn’t Chemo create bad side effects?

    Asked by Fellini on Sunday, March 17, 2019

    Doesn’t Chemo create bad side effects?

    I have carcinoma of unknown primary. It has spread to my leg and lymph node. I’m not sure I want to go through chemo when I know there is no cure and I will feel terrible and possibly be worse than I am now. How did you decide to select to have chemo?

    12 Answers from the Community

    12 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Yes, chemo is not a walk in the park. I was very sick from it. But I trusted my doctors and 7 year later, I'm still here.
      It all depends on you. Your age, your outlook on life and how you want to live your life.
      Go see a counselor who works with cancer patients. It can help you figure out what is the right thing to do.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have stage IV lung cancer. I always said, before diagnosis, "I will never do chemotherapy." When I learned it was my only option ... and it might let me live 4 months ... I ate my words and showed up for chemo.

      Chemo, like cllinda says, was not a walk in the park. I was very sick during the first week with horrible nausea, vomiting, constipation, and fatigue.

      The second and third weeks were much easier to tolerate.

      It was a horrible experience and not one I look forward to repeating. But, I way outlived my 4-month prognosis. I am still here 6-1/2 years later. So, do I regret eating my words and having chemo? Not a chance!

      4 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      It was not an issue for me. What you must balance is you desire to live, your love for others and their love of you. As well, their are clinical trials of newer, less toxic drugs that can extend your life with good quality. Ask about them!

      I have had 20 drugs in 11 regimens, so I know a little about it. Also, I was given a 99.5% chance of NOT making it.

      4 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      LiveWithCancer, I love your new profile pic!

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @Carool, thanks! I was trying to help someone know how to put up a profile picture. I had to walk through the steps to be sure I told them everything. Divo got chosen to be the new guy for awhile when it was time to pick a picture! He was sitting in my lap and the phone was right in his face ... it makes him look like a MUCH bigger cat than he really is :)

      4 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      @LiveWithCancer, I’m sure he feels grateful that he’s now a star! I so love cats, with dogs a very close second.

      4 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Fellini,
      Who told you there was no cure? Plenty of us have metastatic cancer and take chemo and have lived for many years. We don't have a choice if we want to live!!! Tell them you'll take it. You never know what will happen until you TRY!!

      4 months ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Like all the other previous survivors answering this particular question, I am still here five years after being given “ up to two years” to live . Yes, chemo is difficult. My biggest side effect during chemo was the fatigue and my lasting side effect is “ chemo brain “. I have adapted and I am still here to adapt. They say you can not win if you do not play, for me, that is true when it comes to a choice of whether or not to have chemo too.

      4 months ago
    • gertie22's Avatar
      gertie22

      Agree with all those who posted. No, chemo is NOT fun-but nobody promised us that,right? It works for so many and you can get through it. After my first treatment I told my husband "I'm done" his reply? "That's not an option. Know what? he was right. Got through the six and now busy rebuilding strength. Biggest side effects for me (endometrial) were dizziness, loss of appetite and leg cramps. I look back at the treatment and am grateful that it worked.

      4 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Nothing ventured, nothing gained----
      TRY IT

      4 months ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      You might have an unknown primary but they do know what type you have. Not all chemo is the same. I always say, you go through treatment for a short time to hopefully give you a longer time to be here. I like waking up in the morning. I was diagnosed almost 9 years ago and also had a local recurrence and now I'm at my 5 year mark of being NED (No Evidence of Disease). And if it recurs again, then I'll deal with it then!

      4 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      We want to hear about how you are. Please update us.

      I know somebody who had an unknown primary, had tumor removed from her brain, and she's had no recurrence since then (6 years ago).

      26 days ago

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