• Exercise

    Asked by StunnedMike on Monday, February 20, 2012

    Exercise

    I had an appointment with my surgeon on Friday. It has been six weeks since my surgery and he still does not want me running or lifting weights for four more weeks. How long did your surgeons restrict your activities?

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • CarolLHRN's Avatar
      CarolLHRN

      Hey -

      My surgeon only limited me for 4 weeks with the exception of doing abs work. I am/was a swimmer and was able to get right back to it. He told me if something starts hurting, stop but other than that go for it.

      almost 5 years ago
    • StunnedMike's Avatar
      StunnedMike

      Have you been swimming? Do flip turns hurt your abs at all? Can you do a hard pushoff from the wall?

      almost 5 years ago
    • ttisme's Avatar
      ttisme

      I have worked out for years on the machines, because of surgeries to my shoulder and knees. I figured since I'm not working, I could spend several days a week at the gym and playing in the pool....wrong answer.

      My surgery was in October...surgeon said when i can pick up my grand daughter and my stomach doesn't pull I can work on weights. Onc said NO GYM. Mersa (sp) runs rampant in gyms.

      Makes sense to me, but I am miserable and my shoulder and knees, really miss it! I know I am going to end up in PT soon, I can barely walk!

      almost 5 years ago
    • CarolLHRN's Avatar
      CarolLHRN

      I was able to do flip turns but not with as much gusto as I used to. Right now I haven't been swimming because the cold sensitivity. The pool I swim at is kept pretty cold and I get the pins and needles pretty quickly.

      I have my bike on a trainer in my bedroom and I haven't touched it. I just haven't felt like it. I wish it was warmer out and I could just go for a walk outside. I live right across the street from a trail that is along the river and ends up at Heinz Field. I know I would feel so much better if I could walk it. Unfortunately the weather isn't helping my cause.

      I just know I need to do something on my off weeks. I was walking up a steep hill the other day to a meeting and I got all out of breath. That was really sad to me. I used to get up that hill, even in heels with no problems at all. I don't want to get out of shape. I have never been my whole life. It's really getting to me. I was honestly thinking of going to a personal training session just to figure out a plan. Knowing I have another 2 and a half months of chemo and then another surgery, it's a long time for not getting exercise. Besides, exercise always makes me feel better.

      almost 5 years ago
    • Suzy's Avatar
      Suzy

      what kind of surgery did you have? I had bilateral breast reconstruction and was allowed to walk on a treadmill after 1 week and returned to lifting free weights at 5 and in the pool at 6. I think it depends on how much the Dr. values exercise. Get a cardiologist to go to bat for you. Suzy

      almost 5 years ago
    • StunnedMike's Avatar
      StunnedMike

      I had colon resection surgery. The doctor is worried about a hernia.

      almost 5 years ago
    • hessteh's Avatar
      hessteh

      I had an abdominal perineal resection April 2011, followed by chemo and radiation for recurrent rectal cancer. I have a hernia at the stoma site for my colostomy, and am afraid of making it worse. My surgeon says "go for it" on exercise, but I don't feel much like working out, since I feel fatigued and have little energy. I am currently walking 45 minutes each day, but previously I was in the gym or playing golf every day. I am a long way from getting back to that level of exercise, but want to get there. Any suggestions would be appreciated. What are the chances that excercise will make the hernia worse?

      almost 5 years ago
    • StunnedMike's Avatar
      StunnedMike

      Hessteh, I am not qualified to answer your question about hernias. I have been walking outside and on my treadmill. I keep increasing the incline to increase the intensity. I hope to be swimming next week.

      almost 5 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      Hi Stunned Mike - I'd say do as much as is SAFE to do. How does one figure out how much is safe? I don't have a good answer for that.

      I had bilateral mastectomy just over a week ago - no reconstruction. That means no muscle tissue was cut. That's a HUGE difference between my surgery and yours. Recovering from having abs cut just takes longer. With no muscles cut, I was walking on day 2.... Riding a bike on day 6... Washing dishes on day 2... laundry... And Sleeping a ton... and suffering the annoyed glances from my better half, who wanted me to rest more. But, I'm an antsy kind of a person - difficult to hold me still... I've always been like that.

      Honeslty, no running and no lifting weights for your kind of surgery sounds reasonable to me. But, I'm no expert. Those muscles take time to heal up... Perhaps you can frame things from the perspective of what you CAN DO as opposed to what you cannot do? Ask if you can do specific activities..and see what your doc's response is. I bet your list is bigger than you realize - but perhaps it does not include running and lifting weights yet... Maybe elliptical machine? Walking... swimming... biking... etc... By the way, biking outside is awesome... and spring is coming!

      almost 5 years ago
    • Cindy's Avatar
      Cindy

      My surgeon said no lifting over 10 pounds for 6 weeks after my surgery. I did not feel like exercising until about 9 months after my last surgery (except for swimming). I had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophectomy, mass removal, debulking...

      almost 5 years ago
    • workit's Avatar
      workit

      Sorry, new to WhatNext so late on this question. I have one for you, did your surgeon have you exercise in the weeks/days before surgery, or was that not a possibility (sudden diagnosis and surgery)?

      There is an interesting article discussing the benefits of exercising before a planned surgery as opposed to just after it (typical rehab, which you are being prevented from doing for a while):

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21925410

      They sent me the full text article, it was a very interesting read, and an approach (prehabiitation) I think is sorely lacking with surgeons today.

      Hope you are now back exercising!

      over 4 years ago

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