• Experience at the Pain Intervention Clinic

    Asked by jearlesred on Wednesday, April 3, 2013

    Experience at the Pain Intervention Clinic

    After a follow-up sigmoidoscopy, I was told I radiation damage in my rectum from the pelvic radiation I received last summer. I didn't start feeling the pain until after my ileostomy reversal last November. Basically, I feel agonizing pain every time I have a bowel movement and for several hours after. My oncologist has prescribed me pain meds since November, but, last month, referred me to the hospital's pain intervention clinic. I am very upset with how I was treated by the clinic's doctor. I did not ask for the dosage I was prescribed, but was scolded for taking such a high dosage (100 mg of long-lasting morphine twice a day and an optional 30 mg of short-acting for break-through pain). By the end of the meeting, I was made to feel so much like a drug addict that I finally said, look, I don't WANT to take pain meds, okay?! And I don't, but the pain is so intense and I wasn't given any other options. Any suggestions?

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • bbay65's Avatar
      bbay65

      It's horrible that you were made to feel guilty for trying to help yourself. Is it possible to get a different dr. Your quality of life depends on managing your pain. Maybe your onc will have a suggestion. It may just take a phone call. Good luck and I hope you find some relief.

      about 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Jearlesred,
      I am so sorry you had to go through that, and unfortunately as a nurse I see this again and again. I work in oncology/end of life nursing and I always advise my patients with intractable pain to seek out a palliative care physician for issues such as this. Most pain management doctors have to abide by the dose limits set by the hospitals formulary for analgesics (i.e., limit of 200mg a day etc.). Morphine has no ceiling because it affects people differently, so if 5mg of oxycodone might work for you, it might not be enough for me. A palliative doctor abides by the same rules a hospice doc does in that they generally do not have to abide by any dose limit. Often they will perscribe in parameters like from 5 to 20mg as needed. Another plus is that you can get palliative care along with curative care and it is covered by most insurance 100%. If I could make a suggestion to you, because your pain is in a delicate localized area, you might ask your doctor for B & O suppositories which are Belladonna & Opioid Suppositories to help with the localized discomfort. Any pharmacy should be able to make them, but it is mostly palliative docs that order them. Note: to have a palliative doctor on board does NOT suggest that you are dying. It is a doctor that specializes in comfort and extension of life so don't think that I am implying anything other than that. I am just concerned with your level of comfort. I am certified in pain management as are most nurses in my field. I wish you all the best and if I can be of further assistance, I am always checking the site, Carm RN.

      about 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Report the doctor to the head of the clinic and also let your oncologist know what happened. There is no excuse for the treatment you revived, did he not review your medical history, and see that was the dose you were prescribed.

      You defiantly want to find another pain doc. Speak to your oncologist about helping you find another one either at the clinic or a different one.

      about 4 years ago
    • Oktober71's Avatar
      Oktober71

      I see a Palliative Care Doctor who specializes in situations like yours. Well, ours because my pain is in the same area and for the same reasons. Ask your Oncologist who a good palliative care Doc is in your area. I tried a pain clinic, got injections, had my tailbone removed and then still in intractable pain I was told I needed to get injections, looked at like I was annoying the doctor as I cried from helplessness and being tired of chronic pain. I had survived Stage III Rectal Cancer and this pain was worse than my chemo and radiation treatments and postoperative pain. Palliative Care does not mean end of life, it means compassion for people who live in pain from disease. I am not 100% pain free, but I don't cry after every bowel movement anymore. It took a year but pain finally does not control me.

      about 4 years ago
    • jearlesred's Avatar
      jearlesred

      Thanks so much to everyone who responded. It's very nice to receive understanding from those in similar situations and from those in the health care industry. I requested a follow-up with my oncologist next week and I will discuss your suggestions. It's good to go into a meeting knowing what to say and what to ask for. Thank you!

      about 4 years ago
    • Oktober71's Avatar
      Oktober71

      I see a Palliative Care Doctor who specializes in situations like yours. Well, ours because my pain is in the same area and for the same reasons. Ask your Oncologist who a good palliative care Doc is in your area. I tried a pain clinic, got injections, had my tailbone removed and then still in intractable pain I was told I needed to get injections, looked at like I was annoying the doctor as I cried from helplessness and being tired of chronic pain. I had survived Stage III Rectal Cancer and this pain was worse than my chemo and radiation treatments and postoperative pain. Palliative Care does not mean end of life, it means compassion for people who live in pain from disease. I am not 100% pain free, but I don't cry after every bowel movement anymore. It took a year but pain finally does not control me.

      about 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @Oktober71,
      BRAVO, BRAVO...great post and right on point! You are indeed an inspiration. Best of luck to you, Carm RN.

      about 4 years ago

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