• Food

    Asked by virginiarose on Thursday, September 11, 2014

    Food

    After 6 weeks the doctor said I can eat soft easily digested foods and eat more smaller meals. I am at a loss as to what to eat and at what times. How did the rest of you handle this?

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Melon Balls and Fruit Smoothies.
      Easy stuff.....apple sauce etc.
      TRY and eat mostly healthy foods.
      Small amounts all day......just have a bowl of stuff
      next to you at all times and nosh.

      over 6 years ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      Hi virginia, rice is easy on your tummy. Soups with a clear broth may work. Bananas are my go-to. Jello is an option as are Popsicles & you could try pudding & maybe mashed potatoes (no skin). Just some thoughts.

      over 6 years ago
    • Keith59's Avatar
      Keith59

      Eat melons...fruit....jello....pudding...soups....meal replacement drinks.

      over 6 years ago
    • KLC's Avatar
      KLC

      Hi virginiarose ! Smoothies will probably be your best bet. It will not only meet your needs, but, it's an excellent way to get a nutrient dense meal. I start my day off with one every morning. Dairy free yogurt, coconut milk, flaxseeds, ceylon cinnamon, almond butter, dynamic greens powder, I5 protein powder, glutamine, fresh or frozen fruit and fresh or frozen veggies and a couple of ice cubes. Delicious and nutritious ! ! ! Good luck to you ! !

      over 6 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Is there a dietitian associated with your cancer center? Seems like they would also be a great source of information for what will work easily for you. Also, smoothies seem to be a great way to get a lot of nutrition relatively easily. Best of luck!

      over 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Hey KLC.....when are you inviting ME over for Breakfast.?
      I don't have a blender so don't make smoothies....wish I did
      but don't want to spend the money that I don't have.
      I eat all my food Whole.....
      Great stuff guys!!

      over 6 years ago
    • virginiarose's Avatar
      virginiarose

      Wow thank you all for the great suggestions. I also seem to get dizzy a lot after eating I think they call this dumping syndrome. Any one else experience this? If so how are you dealing with it?

      over 6 years ago
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      I would hope that since you have stomach cancer, your onc would give you some guidelines. There are many healthy foods that might not be good on your stomach, for example foods that produce gas might be very uncomfortable for you. Dairy products might not agree with your stomach. So, I would start with asking the doctor or nurse for some guidelines, then modify as you learn what you can tolerate.

      over 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Virginia Rose, if you definitely have GIST and not adenocarcinoma, I would suggest you call the nurse and ask more questions. I ate like you mentioned as soon as I went home (1 week after tumor surgery) and gradually started eating normally, or as before surgery. I've had heartburn for years, so I choose my foods with that in mind, plus whatever prevents nausea when I take my chemo pill, such as Diet Coke.

      over 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Virginia Rose, how are you doing now? My computer is acting weird, and I saw more info after I wrote my first post. How is the Gleevec effecting you? I've been taking it for over a year, and although I know it's easier than IV chemo, I have to work at not being nauseated after I take it. I agree that water tastes different, so I've been taking the Gleevec with other liquids lately, which I need to check on to see if its OK.

      over 6 years ago
    • virginiarose's Avatar
      virginiarose

      BarbarainBham my doc did not give me much info on eating. But I found a lot of info online and I've been making smoothies. Yes the Gleevic makes me nauseous now, it did not before my surgery. I'm still eating 6 small meals a day. I read that we are suppose to eat high calorie high protein foods. But I'm still buying low fat foods. Some habits are hard to change. Also I kinda feel worse than I did before surgery. I sure hope I get better.

      over 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      I had my stomach surgery in February 2013. With your complications you could always call your doctor's office to ask about food. I drink Carnation Instant Breakfast (Breakfast Essentials) mixed with skim milk for a protein supplement to my food. My parents buy Boost High Protein and freeze one every night to eat like ice cream or a milk shake. The Boost chocolate tastes good, except for the Calorie Smart type, which didn't agree with me. I think it has more fiber or something.

      I live alone, so I buy Weight Watcher frozen dinners some, and for a change lately I've bought Stouffers fettucine alfredo which is good. Low fat is probably a good way to eat, especially if you have heartburn. The Nurse Practitioner told me last year that GIST makes people feel bad, and you will gradually feel better. She said she knew of a man who first came in in a wheelchair, who was walking the next time. I do feel better, but I have other problems, too. Please keep in touch. I don't know anybody else with GIST. Best wishes!

      over 6 years ago
    • virginiarose's Avatar
      virginiarose

      PainTerly I also had part of my esophagus removed and most of my stomach. I had my surgery July 2014. And I am still having trouble getting. My surgeon and oncologist did not put me on any vitamins but from what I have read I should be taking them. Currently I'm taking a chewable multi vitamin, chewable calcium with D and the liquid B complex. I am still having trouble getting so I went to a gastroenterologist and he did a scope and said because of scar tissue my esophagus was narrow and that's why food got stuck on the way down. He wants to stretch it out but in 3 different sessions because of the stitches. I also no longer enjoy food. I used to love to cook but not anymore. Food causes so much discomfort that I am at a loss as to what I should eat.

      about 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      VirginiaRose, I hope you are getting your esophagus stretched immediately, My 87 year old mother, who's not a cancer patient, has scar tissue in her esophagus and has to have hers stretched sometimes (every couple of years, I think), which helps her a lot. My own doctor told me that inflammation from gastric reflux also makes your esophagus swell on the inside, so recommended that I take Nexium every day for a few weeks to see if I still had trouble swallowing, and I didn't. Taking Nexium for heartburn also effects how well my Gleevec stays down.

      Aunt Berly and VirginiaRose, I was told with GIST (as opposed to other stomach cancers) that there's no evidence that a special diet has an impact. Of course, it's just common sense to eat a balanced diet and take a vitamin. I just eat the best I can to prevent nausea and heartburn, which sometimes can be bland. If you love to cook, just leave out most spices and it will help. Cinnamon is a problem for me. I've read that dark chocolate is soothing to your digestive system because of its antioxidants, so I've starting eating that almost every day. If you still have trouble swallowing, make things with ground meat rather than something harder to chew like roast beef, or be very conscious of chewing each bite an extra long time. Potatoes or pasta are easy to eat. I'm planning to try some baked or fried apples like Cracker Barrel has, probably leaving out most of the spices.

      Are you familiar with Gist Support International's website and the liferaftgroup.org site?
      Best wishes to you both.

      about 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      AuntBerly, have you tried liquid Boost or Instant Breakfast for extra protein? The chocolate is good, and if you freeze it it tastes like ice cream. Yogurt for a snack is good for you, too. Around the time of my procedures and surgery two years ago, I also had two big deductibles to meet, plus co-pays. At the large clinic where I go, they have financial counseling that includes a program for forgiving deductibles, which I was approved for that year. (You should check into that where you go.) I'm now on Medicare, so everything is different, but my previous deductible was $250 a year starting in December and then another $250 in January 2013, plus I was supposed to pay about 10 percent of the cost of procedures and CT scans, which added up to a LOT that year. It sure takes a lot of pressure off to know you don't have to pay the deductibles.

      about 6 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Make your own Protein Shake with Whey Protein Powder, an Banana and a big scoop of Green Powder Drink. Very healthy and easy to go down....Boost or Ensure is NOT really Food.

      about 6 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      If you go to a not for profit hospital or a medical school clinic, they should have some organized financial assistance. I forgot to mention that the American Cancer Society can give you a list of organizations who pay deductibles and co-pays for people with insurance.

      Patient Services, Inc., is accepting GIST patients (and others) who need help. As you know, WhatNext won't post phone numbers, so go to this link to the newsletter if you would like their phone number. It's at the bottom of each page.

      http://www.patientservicesinc.org/Portals/0/PSI_Winter2015_Web.pdf

      about 6 years ago

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