• For anyone that had to take a leave from work during treatments.

    Asked by Boogerman on Monday, August 19, 2019

    For anyone that had to take a leave from work during treatments.

    When you went back to work were you able to work all day or did you do half days, how was it for you? And what about your employers, how many have had bosses that were OK with you coming back as you were able to?

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Each cancer and treatment is different. Just as each job is different. I was a preschool teacher and there was no way I could work during treatment. I took a leave and when I came back, it was very limited.
      During treatment, you have to do what is best for you. If you are up to work a few days a week, then do it. Find out what your company is willing to do during this time.
      It really can be helpful to work if you are up for it. Good luck.

      about 1 month ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Cllinda is definitely right. I worked through treatment, but I sit on my rump at a computer and audit customer service phone calls for quality and training purposes... I could do that. My employer didn't mess up my FMLA and was accommodating. Good luck.

      about 1 month ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I was able to take an entire year off - due to donated sick leave. When I was ordered back to work, it was on "light duty" - which to HR was 40 hours per week. No different from those who work in the office. So, Dr. wrote instructions to HR that I was to work no more than 20 hours per week, increasing as I was able. When I got to 32 hours per week, my employer threatened to terminate me within two weeks unless I returned to full duty, even though I was still in treatment.

      So, I retired and did not regret it for a single moment.

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      My work issues were when I was doing chemo before my surgery. There were days when I had to take off work to have chemo * days when I couldn't make it to work due to the side effects, plus days when I made it in but my coworkers helped me carry the load. After my surgery I took off for 2 months. When I went back I was well enough to perform my duties. My boss had lost someone close to cancer so he was very understanding. As soon as he learned of my diagnosis he called me into the office and told me "whatever you need ~ don't worry about it"

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      po18guy ~ where was your union? Employers aren't allowed to do that stuff. I'm glad it worked out for you but what about someone younger person who works there? Not everyone is in a position to retire.

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      During my first 2 diagnoses, I worked when I could. I could not workday of treatment or two days after. But on that 3rd day, I was up and into work. I felt like crap, looked like crap, and was a scary looking site. I was a sales recruiter/trainer for a sales company. I would travel fro Memphis to one of 13 different states and hold hiring seminars on Monday. Fly back on Monday night and be in the office for the rest of the week. The following week I had treatment on Monday, no work until Wednesday. I was also off and not able to do any work on days of procedures and whenever I had something done that would put me in the hospital for a few days. My employer at the time was good to let me be off, I was always in the office when I could otherwise.

      During my last diagnosis, I owned my own company so I could do what I wanted. But my routine was treatment in the morning at 8, at the office by 9 and out in the field working by 930. When the fatigue got bad enough a few weeks into the radiation I would go home about 2 for a nap.

      I have been on both sides of the employee/employer table for this. I can fully understand a small company like mine not being able to carry an employee who couldn't work to contribute to pay his own way. We could not afford to have someone on the payroll that wasn't turning some business to pay for themselves. The larger companies are more capable of doing that, then it's just a matter of if they will. Unions are in fewer companies these days and aren't much help in this situation unless you happen to be working for a company that is.

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      Yeah Greg, unfortunately the antiunion sentiment in this country is growing rather than shrinking. I will never understand how blue collar workers can keep voting against the best interests of their own families. Like I said, my boss was totally sympathetic and helpful, but even if he hadn't been my union would have backed me and made him obey the law.

      about 1 month ago

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