• Found lump: December 16, 2012 Saw OBGYN: December 17, 2012 Got MAMMO/ US: December 17, 2012

    Asked by HearMeRoar on Tuesday, January 22, 2013

    Found lump: December 16, 2012
    Saw OBGYN: December 17, 2012
    Got MAMMO/ US: December 17, 2012

    My appointments were back to back and immediate because I am pushy and serious and don't like to waste time NOT because the doctor thought my lumps were highly suspicious!

    I saw the breast surgeon on 12.21.12. Had the lumps removed on 1.4.13. Had a great report afterwards... "99% sure it isn't cancer, have to wait for pathology to confirm."

    January 14th... IT IS BREAST CANCER! Still looks small and treatable. January 17th appointment and MRI. MRI finds 4 additional "suspicious spots" that are very tiny (5 mm). My confirmed cancer is 1.5 cm. First thought as AHHH cut 'em off. Surgeon said, great, let's do it. Didn't try to slow me down or anything. My biggest fear is to find out all those spots are cancer and it is in my nodes etc. after waking up in horrific pain from a double mast.

    I am thinking of asking for a biopsy of those lumps and of my nodes FIRST to get the best picture of what I am dealing w/ before painful surgery. Is that logical?

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • Baldredhead's Avatar
      Baldredhead

      I believe it is always best to make such a decision with all possible information before you - Please know that even with a perfect outcome, you will need to be vigilant with mammograms for your own peace of mind. I've been through lumpectomies, biopsies, mastectomy....so I am here to tell you that no matter what, it CAN be done! Prayers for you and the wisdom of you and your doctors in deciding the best course of action for you.

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Hugs and good look. It may not be possible for them to remove a 5 mm tumor, because it is not easily visible to the naked eye. An MRI, particularly with contrast is the most sensitive scan for picking these things up. When I was diagnosed with Advanced Renal cell carcinoma, the CT w/contrast only picked up the largest lesions on my live - about 1.2 CM, the MRI showed 5 more between 2-6 MM

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I meant to say biopsy, which would probably remove the tumor because it is so small. Another question do they show up on a sonogram? My Biopsies were done using either a CT(Kidney cancer) or sonogram (breast cancer) to guide the Dr.

      over 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Nope, I think it is totally illogical. Why go through two or three separate hospital admissions and surgeries. By the time you go through 4 more biopsies, and sentinal node excision, you will have already had more scaring, surgical recovery time and pain, and will need reconstruction or prosthetics to even out your breasts. And the likelihood is, you will still need or want a mastectomy after all of that anyway. Even if the 4 additional tumors are benign at this point, it is a risk factor for recurrence.

      Surgery is not painful, in fact you won't even be aware of it. And one surgery for a mastectomy is less painful and requires less recovery time that multiple surgeries with multiple incisions.

      over 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      I had multiple biopsies (simple, minimally invasive procedures) before making decisions about surgery. The biopsies told me a lot about the nature of the cancer (size, grade, receptors) and allowed my doctors and me to make educated decisions. Ask about biopsies. You may be told the new spots are two small to biopsy, but you won't know this unless you ask.

      over 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      In my experience, biopsies of breast lumps and lymph nodes can be done without general anesthesia, hospital admission, or a surgeon. Radiologist performed mine with a local anesthetic. There is no recovery time and no scarring from a needle which is the diameter of a pencil lead. Still, your additional lumps sound really tiny and it may not be possible to "find" them with an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy. You need to ask. You may end up choosing mastectomy anyway but you will feel better if you know you had as much information as possible when you made the decision.

      over 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      "...too small to biopsy..." not "...two small to biopsy..." Ugh.

      over 4 years ago
    • KFH's Avatar
      KFH

      HearMeRoar - wishing you all the best. I did a lot of soul searching and got a lot of information before I made a decision to have a lumpectomy. My tumor was 1.5cm as well. My first thought was a double mastectomy too, but after consultation with surgeons, oncologist, geneticist, and plastic surgeon and lots of prayer, I chose a lumpectomy. You should do what is right for you. Not everyone's surgical experience is easy and not everyone's experience is difficult. Everyone is different. By the time I came to my decision, I was very comfortable with it. My surgeon confirmed my choice when I asked her what she would do if it was her daughter in the same situation as me. There are lots of things to consider regardless of your choice. Agree with Baldredhead and wware. You don't have to decide today. Get the information you need to feel comfortable with your decision. Keeping you in my prayers. Karen

      over 4 years ago
    • Nancebeth's Avatar
      Nancebeth

      My tumor was though to be 1 cm. It was in the upper quadrant of my left breast. I could have had a lumpectomy. However, for me, there was no consideration of a lumpectomy. I had a bilateral mastectomy with immediate reconstruction with silicone gel implants. I didn't have as much pain as I thought I would but there was quite a bit of discomfort. You have time and you need to make an informed decision based on your personal history, as everyone's cancer is different and everyone's experience is different.

      over 4 years ago
    • karen1956's Avatar
      karen1956

      MRI's tend to show lots of false positives....those spots that lit up on the MRI might not be cancer....After my mammo, US and biopsy comfirming cancer, I had an MRI....more spots lit up on BC side as well as the other side....so more biopsies...and the BC side was positive for more cancer, but the other side was benign....I ended up doing a bilat, but that was because I already needed a mastectomy and both surgeons suggested I consider a bilat...since that was one of my questions, I went that route and have never regretted it.....for me the "benign" side turned out to be pre-cancerous post bilat......I was stage 3....3 tumors and lymph nodes on BC side...ILC.....
      I was not in horrible pain post bilat....and I was very comfortable with my decision.... I interviewed 2 surgeons before even seeing the oncologist....and the oncologist also thought the bilat was prudent for me.....
      I'd say, slow down a bit and get a 2nd opinion....Once you have a bilat you can't change your mind...but doing a single mastectomy or lumpectomy...you can always decide later on to do mastectomy or bilat......AND, yes get additional biopsies of what was seen on the MRI!!!!

      over 4 years ago
    • HearMeRoar's Avatar
      HearMeRoar

      Ladies,

      You are a blessing. Thank you!

      over 4 years ago

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