• Has anyone used one of these DNA Companies? The ones advertised on TV all the time Ancestry.com or 23 & Me?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Tuesday, January 23, 2018

    Has anyone used one of these DNA Companies? The ones advertised on TV all the time Ancestry.com or 23 & Me?

    We might find out that we were predisposed to having cancer due to our ancestry. It might be interesting to find out, or scary, one or the other.

    22 Answers from the Community

    22 answers
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Yes, I just had my ancestry DNA tested, but not any medical info was given. I think the 23 & Me
      offers more of a medical type test.
      But what I had done was quite surprising and interesting.

      4 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Because my dad was adopted_ I don't really know my heritage. I will follow this thread to see how others think of this test.

      4 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      I used Ancestry rather than 23 and Me because I already have taken genetic tests for cancer mutations as well as an other rather rare cardiac gene mutation (and I'm negative). I'm just taking up the reins of family genealogy research as mu Dad is now 85 and thinking of retiring -- although he's got another book at his publisher, so who knows!

      My sister and brothers have also done the Ancestry test and we just got our parents to send their spit in. The Ancestry test doesn't give you health info - only 23 and Me offers that feature and it's expensive.

      4 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      cllinda - if your Dad is no longer alive, you can do the DNA and upload your raw data to a couple different sites to help identify relatives (if they've tested). There are also groups on Facebook that will help adoptees and their offspring find their birth families, if you're interested.

      I'm finding the DNA stuff is a bit of a learning curve for me and I know a great deal of science so it's not for everyone but it might answer some questions for you.

      btw, if your father is still alive, have him take the test as the best results will be gained from relatives closest to the one you're trying to find.

      Let me know if you have questions. I'm not an expert but I do know a bit about this.

      4 months ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I know several people including my DD and her wife who use 23&Me or Ancestry - these test can are accurate going back about 150 years, and can only tell you where your ancestors come from, based on your DNA variants. They can not give you any information about disease risk, gene mutations, etc. I am a Participant in a Gnomic Project called "all of us" run by NIH. The goal is to get complete DNA genome information of millions of people in the USA. The goal is to create a research database for developing treatments for cancer and other medical issues. In NYC they are Partnering with Columbia Presbyterian, which is where I am being treated - for more information about the program click here
      https://www.nih.gov/AllofUs-research-program/pmi-cohort-program-announces-new-name-all-us-research-program

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have a friend who has had the DNA test done through Ancestry.com. One thing about Ancestry is you have to be willing to share the results. He found quite a few relatives that he contacted and but he was also contacted by others. He wanted me to take the DNA thing. But to be blunt I would rather not be located. If I were young and contemplating marriage I might want to get a medical genealogy

      4 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Boise- you don’t have to make your results public; my sister didn’t. No one can contact her or see her results.

      SueRae- 23and Me DOES do health testing. I don’t know how in depth their tests go as I chose the Ancestry DNA test.

      4 months ago
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      I did 23 and Me the year before I was diagnosed.
      It showed me at typical risk for breast cancer (whoops) and at lower risk for migraines (whoops -- though in fairness, my migraines have been infrequent and are aura-only).
      Bottom line: genetic predisposition (or lack thereof) is only one factor with respect to disease.

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      MY Hispanic neighbor-original Spanish family to NM-was contacted by National Geographic to track Jewish immigration from Spain to New Mexico during the Spanish Inquisition. The family was very proud of their Jewish blood. She was devastated--Her family is Arabian-not Jewish. Maria cried and said- what should we do? It's so embarrassing.

      4 months ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      I was just emailing with my daughter when I realized something. We were discussing the closure of the ToysRus and where we would shop for my granson;s toys. She of course went to the computer scree. Then it dawned on me, I am probably the last of the tactile generation. I much prefer a hands on approach to most everything. Especially shopping. But it seems now they are just as happy getting everything online. I've tried online shopping, but most everything I order I have to return, because it is not what I expected. Especially clothes. Any DNA! I have considered it, but I am concerned as to what happens to my DNA when they are done testing. DNA the last frontier. It seems that my DNA is the last precious thing I own, so I am being careful as to how I share it. It helps that I can trace my family back to the 1860"s. I am very english (Southalls, Hancocks, Wolfreys) with some Native American ( my granddad was half Native American) & probably some french. My great-great grandmother was a Beauchamp. My great granddaddy (Ulysses Wolfrey) lived to be 110 years olf. I was counting on those genes. Oh Well! Live never goes as you plan it. At least not for me. Also Papa ( my greatgranddaddy) came down to Petersburg from Staunton. And I have seen pictures where I look very much like my great grandmother ( Mariam Elizabeth Southall Wolfrey). As far diseases goes, pancreatic/liver cancer runs in the family. Guess I lucked up some. But cancer is cancer. And each type has it's downfalls. In some ways it would be nice to know if you were a carrier of certain diseases. Otherwise I wonder how much environmental factors play into you getting certain diseases. My daughter is uber flexible, not a good thing. She recently found out she has Ehlers Danlos Hypermobility type. She has no connective tissue. As she ages she will be in alot of pain and there is nothing they can do about it. Fortunately my grandson is not showing any signs of this disease. However he could be a carreir.

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I did some research about this before Christmas. Pretty much everyone says that a person should have 3 DNA tests-- Ancestory-which does the mother's -female line, doesn't test for the male chromosome at all-can be done on males and females. It goes back about 150 years--and lets you know about relatives. You can talk to them if you want. They like for you to pay a monthly membership to be online. Nobody has to be online. They can just get their results. and then decide what to do

      23andme--is best for health--good for genealogy

      Whats suggested is genealogy-Ancestory which has the largest data base- that way you can check on cousins-etc and ask about their health problems-- Then 23 and Me for health--and research the male side.

      I wanted to check out my father's side--the Spanish Armada-Irish family history-

      I can't do that- They say they need to have a sample from a male of my generation or older. I'm 75---my dad passed a few decades ago----most of my cousins on his side were older and now dead--My brother passed this summer---- I'm not even interested in the females. My mom was born, when her mother was in her 50s. I thought that was sort of improbable.

      One of my mother's brothers-Uncle harry- was always paying special attention to my mom-he was in his early 20s when my mother was born. So my grandmother might be my great grandmother.

      I saw the suitcase that my grandmother brought from Hamburg when she was a child-that's my history, not the history of some poor girl that my uncle seduced or raped. - I was curious if part of my father's family really was a Black African slave in the Spanish Navy-which legend says-Yes- or some fancy- ancy Spanish fop-- I can't get answers to those questions--

      A good link for questions is FamilyHistoryDaiiey.com which gives a good comparison of the different DNA companies

      If your family came from the British Isles LivingDNA.com is a good company---it can trace back to the French invasion and some Viking and German invaders. That's cool--but it wouldn't answer the question about the Spanish Armada

      4 months ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      i figure we were indentured servants sent over from Newgate. could be true!

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Indentured- a word for "White Slave"

      4 months ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      Correct! Skin color is not a sign of slavery! But indentured knew their length of slavery . All for a loaf of bread!

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I don't like the idea of my ancestry to be known. I know that DNA is what makes up my physical being but it is not who I am. My parents and grandparents were the people who taught me and thus shaped my life they are part of who I am but only the part I CHOSE. Beyond that the environment beat up on my body and my DNA. How I coped is part of who I am. Then there are the life-event again how I responded is part of who I am. Then there are my teachers, my pastors, my friends (and those who have hurt me ), and the books I have read and yes even some movies and television I have watched all have contributed to who I am. But how I responded to those contributions is who I really am today and tomorrow I will someone slightly different tomorrow. And there may be some events in the future that will make me a profoundly different person. As for medical records going back more than 100 years we get into many misdiagnosis. I do know that I am likely to be legally blind in the near future my father had macular degeneration, my eyes were injured in an auto accident and chemo did a number on my optic nerve. My eye Dr. sees me every six months. So I can only say I am who I am not my DNA

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Not, if you were a prisoner of some country, and they filed false papers. Nothing like blowing up British soldiers in Ireland, as an example.

      Some owners treated indentured servants quite well, and followed the law. While many were greatly mistreated without legal recourse, or died from brutal work and treatment. It was especially pathetic for indentured children, whose parents sold them into servant-hood.

      4 months ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      But it is interesting to know. I had a crazy aunt. she always told everyone we were descendants of Pochantas. I seriously doubt it, but her daddy always called his indian princess. And yes your ancestry does effect who you become. Those same parents that raised you had history as did their parents, etc. But I agree your environment also plays into it. And to a point you can choose who you become and are. But I am not roosevelt nor never will be no matter how much I may want to be. I think people just want some roots, to say this is where I came from. think about people living in Europe. Think of the history they grow up with and have. Being an American we don't have that "weight" if you will. But maybe we want it. Also another reason not to look into my DNA. You might be seriously disappointed. I may not be as english as I think I am. But again I am cherishing my DNA for now. At least more rules are in place. We are treading new ground every day. I remember my great grandaddy, they did an interview on him at his 100 birthday. They asked him the biggest change he had seen in his lifetime (he was born circa 1860), he said men don't wear hats anymore. Of all the things he had seen that is what he noticed. It is interesting to have an idea of what your ancestors life was like. And realize the difference from then to now. Example, my Dad was born illigetimate in the 1920"s. He was treated like a second class citizen. Now days no one cares anymore. Lots of children are born out of wedlock now. He never acknowledge his mother, she was always his sister to him.. Also there are many lessons to learn from history. Maybe we won't repeat all of them.

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Dkatsmeow--my family has a wonderful American pedigree. Nothing to be ashamed of---

      They all immigrated-ha, ha, from the late 1600s @ New York state--from one of the German states. German remained the first language until WW1. They were in the French-Indian War-NY. They were farmers, frontiersmen, and patriots. They also served in the Continental Army- NY.
      They followed the Great Lakes-Rust belt til they stopped in Western Minnesota. They served under Gen Dodge during the Civil War. It's a great heritage to be from frontiersmen, farmers, and patriots.

      In the 1890s, my maternal grandmother, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins illegally crossed the Detroit River and went to Iowa. Today, she'd be called a Dreamer. Many of their children became Marines in WW!!. The others became farmers-small business men-doctors-bankers-real estate developers-financial advisors-veterinarians. They fled Hamburg, Germany with warrants on their heads for sedition-being terrorists. That was also legend--the women and children managed to get to the docks, and boarded ships. The men stole the Dukes prize cattle herd, and took it to the steam ship company. Ellis Island wouldn't take them-politics? Canada took them in. Then they crossed the river.

      Ft. Riley, KS was home for the Irish side of the family-the escaped indentured servant that blew up British soldiers. My paternal grandmother's family managed to escape the English before the Revolutionary War .

      So, my American Heritage includes 6 cousins in the 101 Screaming Eagles that parachuted into that terrible fire and massacre at St. Lo on D Day, Marines that died on Pacific beaches, sgts that fought in Korea--then Viet Nam-- carpenters, college professors -math, cowboys, hunters, trappers, bankers, butchers, mailmen, farmers, professional soldiers, TG, none were politicians. It's bad enough that Uncle Paul was a real estate developer.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have a friend who is adopted that did 23 and Me and Ancestry. I can honestly say that it has changed her to have done the tests. And, not necessarily for the best.

      There must be something wrong with me. I could care less about my history. I know little about it ... and that's okay with me. My uncle (dad's brother) did a lot of geneology studying before he died. I think someone sent my mom a book with a lot of family history ... not sure if that was on my dad's side or hers... I never even opened it to look at it. (I don't think she did either ...)

      4 months ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      meyati, Wow, you certainly have a fascinating bunch of relatives, and amazing history. That is why we should try to find out about our ancestors if we are so inclined. You have learned not only about them but about our nation's history, not just bland, boring dates & facts, but about those who built America with sweat & blood & guts & moxie!
      Glad there were no politicians among them.

      I found out that I have DNA from the British Isles, and southern Ireland, and a surprise...... I have some DNA from the Middle East, no doubt from Israel, but no one ever mention that to me, and I am delighted and proud to have blood from there in my veins!

      Can you tell me if this DNA info is just from my mother's side, not father's? I used Ancestry.

      4 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I haven't had any DNA--but females carry mitochondrial DNA, males carry both types of DNA. -mitochondrial and Y-Chromosome. Y-Chromosome can only be taken from a male.

      All of the information that you have is from your mother. I don't understand, I just parrot what I read. I think the more I read, the less sense it makes. Anyway, you can find male cousins and uncles.

      Right now science is trying to find out why this happens-not that this helps me. .I'm going to quit while I'm ahead. Anyway--I got my info from the family Bible and my grandparents.

      4 months ago
    • charnell's Avatar
      charnell

      I just did that and am awaiting my results. https://refer.23andme.com/s/mandysue7
      This is a coupon, if interested.

      4 months ago

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