• Have any of you been admitted to a hospital and give them your prescriptions list only to have them XXX it up and be giving you the wrong

    Asked by GregP_WN on Sunday, February 25, 2018

    Have any of you been admitted to a hospital and give them your prescriptions list only to have them XXX it up and be giving you the wrong

    Only to have them give you the wrong dosage, or skip one of them or give you something not even on your list? We have had this happen 3 times in a row with Donna's Mom, in three separate facilities. One time caused her to have seizures because they stopped a seizure med. Right now she is still in a hospital in Nashville trying to bounce back from that. It's frustrating and makes you want to call one of those numbers on TV with the Lawyers advertising, "you deserve to get paid for what you've been through". I've never, seen this happen before. Much less 3 times in a row!

    15 Answers from the Community

    15 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      I was a nurse for many years and I always tell patients to watch every pill given and PAY ATTENTION.

      7 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I have only had that happen to me once at a pharmacy. The capsules were different than to those I was used to taking so I took them back and inquired. I got a replacement of the right script but began to wonder how often that happens.

      When my Aunt was in a rehab center it was a daily fight to get them to give her her meds.

      Hospitals are paid spectacular amounts of money. Im not so sure those profits are split fairly with the staff. You owe it to your family, sadly, to double check everything.

      7 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I am sorry, Greg. It would be very frustrating.

      My husband got pills once that looked different than they had always looked. It was when he was recovering from his quadruple bypass surgery. We had already had some issues with him either getting the wrong meds given to him or the nurse calling the right drug by the wrong name so i was wary.

      I took the bottle to pharmacy. It ended up being okay. The VA changed suppliers or the pharmaceutical company changed the appearance of the drug, i can't remember which.

      7 months ago
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      Greg, what happened to your mom is infuriating. I don't blame you one bit for wanting to give those ambulance chasers a call.

      Every nurse who sees a patient is supposed to log every action on a flowsheet. That includes every med and dosage administered, every vital taken, and every observation of patient behavior. Flowsheets (I've seen them called both nurse flowsheets and patient flowsheets) are not included when you request a hospitalization record; you must request and pay for them separately. But they can be an important paper trail.

      I remember going with my father to pick up some of my mother's many prescriptions (for diabetes and heart disease) in the late 60s and 70s. At the pharmacy he spilled out the bottle contents in front of the pharmacist and painstakingly counted all the pills. If there were several bottles, he did one bottle at a time. At the time I thought he was overreacting, but now I know better.

      I carry an ER "go bag" with me, which includes several days' worth of the pills I take (vitamins and anastrozole); I rotate the stock month to month. When I was hospitalized for a chemo port-induced blood clot, the anastrozole I had on hand came in handy because for some reason the hospital computer wouldn't accept the time of my first night's dosage and wouldn't accept a manual override, either. In my own case that would have been no big deal if I didn't have my own pills, but for something like a seizure med that would have been nuts. It tells me that human error isn't the only thing we have to guard against. Stupid computers can pose health risks, too.

      7 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      Oh yes,coming ouf of anesthesia a nurse gave me codeine and I had chest pains from being allecgic to one of many medicines.And also,if a pharmacist was asking why I was given a prescription when it had the same ingredients as what they first gave me.Pharmacists know medicine more than doctors when it comes to prescriptons.Just remembered that I couldn't get surgery one day and had to go another day,because I had a very bad reaction to one of the anesthesia medication and had to call my primary doctor to the pre-op.Also ,almost killed me with iodine dye for an XRay.
      They have a whole lists of allergies on me
      .And still careless.Not just on medicines.I could go on and on.

      7 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      Greg why do you think I want to give up on seeing doctors and hospitals?And it won't do any good to try and to get a lawyer they're all in together.I've had that problem with the mamogram dept.so no one else would have to experience what I did with them.After a month or two the lawyer told me she couldn't do anything to help me ,because they didn't do anything wrong.And I got a bout ao medical papers about a couple of inches that had all lies ,and things tat I can and don't want to remember.
      And being an inpatient a few years ago I can imagine how bed it gotten the whole staff is cold .I don't know how else to describe how bad the mwedical field as gotten.Sorry for discouraging you Greg,but this stuff needs to be known.

      7 months ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      I guess we've been lucky. My husband is a frequent flyer at the hospital. There are some of his meds that they don't have so I bring them in or they sub one of his cholesterol meds with a different one in the same class. So far, so good.
      We did try to sue hubby's surgeon for missing that his cancer came back until it was too large to be operable or curable. But after the attorney having the papers for 3 months we got the call that they felt there wasn't a case. It's so hard to sue a doctor now.

      7 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @PaulineJ, you are in Boston. Is there not another facility where you can go?

      Mine (in TX) is nothing like yours. I nearly always have a great experience. I get surveys after every visit to complete. I presume they read and heed those?? The few times i haven't had a good experience, i let them know that way.

      Once, recently, i had the worst chemo nurse ever. I told my doctor, the nurse who drew my blood and another chemo nurse who is my friend. My records have been marked to never assign her to me again. I bet if she treats very many patients as poorly as she did me, she won't be working there for long.

      7 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      She is still in the Hospital and we drive to Nashville every day to visit and talk with the Doctors. It's a 2.5 to 3 hr. drive. She is slowly getting better but is still out of it most of the time. She can recognize us and knows who we are but will occasionally say something that's out in left field. We have seen this behavior from her when her potassium levels get too low before. It's just frustrating to have seen her sitting up on the side of the bed, almost able to walk on her own when she was in the rehab facility, to losing so much progress. Now, she couldn't begin to get out of bed.

      7 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have has several experiences with mis-medication. Two I believe weakened my father and hastened his death. My father had fallen and had cut his leg badly we had a nurse practitioner coming in to dress his wound. The nurse said that if I should take my father to the ER I was to notify the nursing service and they would meet me at the ER. Later that day (Saturday) my father began to feel sick and I decided to head for the ER. I was on my way out the nurse said no she would see my father at home. I assumed that she would just accompany me to the ER. Well she did NOT. instead she told me to stop all medications and take my father to the Dr. Monday. I did and my father missed two sets of pills and continued to get worse. I took my father to the ER. The Dr. there had a fit.
      Later I took my father to his cardiologist. My health care system was just going online and his cardiologist's clinic had just been purchased by the system and the physical records were in the process of being entered online. I always took his pill box because on the back was a list of all the medications. I noticed that there was one missing. I brought this to the attention of the Dr. and he fumbled around trying to enter the prescription. Somehow the prescription did not get sent to the pharmacy so when we picked up my father's pill box that pill was not there. We had to call the Dr. and get him to straighten the prescription then we had to have the pharmacy set up another pill box.

      7 months ago
    • Lauraandmary's Avatar
      Lauraandmary

      The problem is worsened by each facility having a "formulary", which is the institution's "approved drug list". Many, many drugs are not included on it. The physician then substitutes a similar drug for the medication not included on their formulary. This (and the continuous changing of vendors on generic drugs) makes it difficult for the patient to keep track of what they are receiving and when. Not like the old days when grandma always knew the yellow pill was "my water pill".
      We also had a medical assistant try to enter the incorrect drug on a med list, stating "Your drug is not in our computer, so I'll just put this one. It's close." Umm, no.

      7 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I had a serious incident not with prescriptions but with a nurse not following orders. This nurse felt that she knew more than the Dr.s. She felt that I had not pooped soon enough after surgery. I was passing gas well enough. When the Dr. came in she asked him if I should have a dose of milk of magnesia. The Dr. who had listened to my bowel sounds said we could wait another 10 to 12 hours, As soon as the Dr. had gone she put a dose of milk of magnesia down my tube. In about 4 hours my colon shut down and I was in excruciating pain. I had to have a very painful procedure.

      7 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      BoiseB Sorry I can't click like on your last comment.Sooooooo sad.

      7 months ago
    • charnell's Avatar
      charnell

      You really really have to be in charge. I had so many XXX ups. I was told someone else's diagnosis. I was given the wrong chart. The list goes on and on. I am so sorry for you. You do not need this. Blessings to you and I hope she gets better soon.

      7 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      We just returned home from visiting again today. She is getting a little better each day, but is improving very slowly. We can tell she's getting better though because she's starting to get snippy with some of us. And she's asking to go home. So that's an improvement. Thanks for your concern from everyone.

      7 months ago

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