• Have any of you had to have all your teeth pulled after having radiation in the neck/mouth area?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Saturday, August 18, 2012

    Have any of you had to have all your teeth pulled after having radiation in the neck/mouth area?

    I am scheduled to have mine taken out next month, it will be done in an operating room. There is a fear of osteoradionecrosis, so they want to be extremely careful to prevent this from happening. Has anyone had the osteoradionecrosis?

    6 Answers from the Community

    6 answers
    • Moonflay's Avatar
      Moonflay

      I had to go here to find out what osteoradionecrosis was: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2568331/
      I did find some of those articles interesting. I had to have all my teeth removed many years ago due to illness. I wish you the best of luck with your extractions.

      /Hug

      over 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Moonflay, did you have radiation to the mouth or neck area? And since it was several years ago, I am assuming you haven't had any problems healing up? My Oncologist gave me a good education on the osteo, he was afraid I might get it.
      thanks for the feedback

      over 4 years ago
    • outdoorboywa's Avatar
      outdoorboywa

      I had radiation to my neck and lower head 24 years ago and that has never been suggested to me. Tended to be higher doses back then as well, "maximum lifetime dose." I just had a tooth removed in Jan. and broke away some bone in the process, and it has healed up even better than average and is ready for and implant. But I don't use tobacco and take reasonably good care of my teeth.

      I am a little confused after reading the literature and your post. The literature talked about taking out all questionable teeth BEFORE radiation because the radiation damages the blood vessels and the tissues have a harder time healing from dental work. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18173447 So taking them all out afterwards to prevent osteoradionecrosis doesn't really make sense according to the recommendations on the pubMEd articles. Having major surgery after the radiation would be a big cause of concern, not a remedy. Are their other factors such as tobacco use, periodontitis etc., or just a lot of dental issues? The articles also mentioned hyperbaric O2, and other therapies that would help prevent it and not be as invasive. I am not saying doctor is wrong, it could just be that I am missing some really important information. Something doesn't sound quite right from the little information you have posted. Information is power, get as much as you can and from more than one source, Don't let a doctor push you around just because that procedure is "what they normally do". Make them explain why it is the best option in your specific case.

      If I was going to face such a surgery, and most of my teeth were good, I would definitely want a second opinion and some options. If most of my teeth were questionable anyway, it would make more sense, but I still think I would want to know more about options.

      over 4 years ago
    • Moonflay's Avatar
      Moonflay

      My tooth extractions were not due to cancer. I had problems with my teeth after pregnancy due to some genetic qualities I was lucky enough to inherit. Thousands of dollars and years of torture in braces down the drain, lol.

      over 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Outdoorboy: This being my third time going through this I have read al that and researched it, it didn't sound good when they told me I could get it, and been told by the dr.s to get teeth taken care of before treatment, which I did all three times. I had perfect teeth, no problems, that was 24 years ago, slowly there would be a little problem with a tooth, then another, all dentists never said a problem with radiation. This last time, 4 years ago, I went to make sure no problems with my teeth before I was ever given a treatment program. I had everything in good shape. Treatment turned out to be radiation, again. since then my teeth have cracked, broken, chipped spots have turned into decay, basically just fallen apart. NOW, the oral surgeon at hospital, and the oncologist have told me the down fall of the teeth was from being treated twice, now saliva in the mouth, and reduced blood flow. So,the surgery is not to prevent anything, its to get rid of the teeth, and to hopefully prevent the condition from happening, by being careful in surgery to remove them. They have been concerned about the HBO treatments since there is a possiblity of jump starting a dormant cell.
      My teeth are junk and are going to have to come out. My only hope is that having it done in the operating room by oral surgeon will be as carful as it can be.

      over 4 years ago
    • thestarr's Avatar
      thestarr

      I had a tooth pulled in August. The dentist knew that I had chemo & radiation but pulled the tooth. As a result, I now have osteoradionecrosis. I have since been to a oral surgeon and he has been treating me cleaning out bone and whatever else has to be done. He wants me to go for oxygen treatment. He also said NEVER have a tooth pulled by a dentist, go to an oral surgeon they have a special way of pulling the teeth.

      over 4 years ago

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