• Have you had a Breast Cancer Recurrance after lumpectomy?

    Asked by Kurious on Monday, April 15, 2019

    Have you had a Breast Cancer Recurrance after lumpectomy?

    If so, how long did it take to return? Did it return in same area and what treatment does your doctor suggest?

    21 Answers from the Community

    21 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I'm a six and a half year survivor. I had a lumpectomy because my doctor recommended it. She said it's about the same odds as going through a mastectomy. So I had the lumpectomy. So far no recurrence. Knock on wood.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Congratulations on no recurrence. I had a lumpectomy Oct. 2016 and since then, sonogram every 6 months. My last sonogram was this month and indicated I need another biopsy in same area. I'm scheduled for biopsy on April 18, 2019 and hoping for neg. results, but can't help wondering if previous lumpectomy missed some cancer cells. I have heard that cancer can go undetected for two years before it finally shows up on a sonogram. Thank you for responding to my previous message.

      2 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I hope it's negative. Now when I had my lumpectomy, I got a call that they didn't get clear margins so I had a second one. They cut all the way up to bone. So I was hoping they got it all.
      It could have been a couple rogue cells or its a new cancer. I hope you get good news soon.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Thanks Linda.

      2 months ago
    • lujos' Avatar
      lujos

      I’ve had a recurrence 4 years after lumpectomy, chemo and rads. Luck of the draw, don’t think it had anything to do with having a lumpectomy.

      2 months ago
    • Nanato07's Avatar
      Nanato07

      I had a lumpectomy in November of 2005. This was followed by a surgery in December of 2005 to get clean margins. Chemo, radiation, and tamoxifen for 5 years. Went for my annual mammogram in February of 2019 and they saw a suspicious spot in same area as scar. Biopsy in March showed cancer. I went to the same oncologist from 2005 for consultation. He says its a "new" cancer. Not the same type as before. Because I've already had radiation in that area, a mastectomy is recommended. Luckily, this was caught early. (again) Stage 2 in 2005. Stage 1 this time. I have a consultation with a plastic surgeon on April 22. I'm leaning towards a double mastectomy with reconstruction because I don't want to have to constantly worry about breast cancer. I am 58 years old. I had a PET scan done last week and am blessed to say that this awful disease doesn't seem to have spread anywhere else. After surgery, I will do chemo once again and most likely Tamoxifen or something similar for 5-10 years. I don't believe this new diagnosis has anything to do with the lumpectomy. It's just one of those things that happens.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Lujos, good to know you didn't need a mastectomy. Wishing you all the best.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Nanato07, I am glad for you that your recurrence was discovered at stage one, but I am wondering how he was able to conclude it was not a recurrence of your previous cancer (since it was same area as previous cancer). Also, your response says you are leaning toward a double mastectomy because you don't want to worry about breast cancer and I was wondering if you are aware that even with a double mastectomy, cancer still has possibility of returning.

      2 months ago
    • Maryflier's Avatar
      Maryflier

      Hi. I had a lumpectomy September 2001. 16 years later I had a recurrence, this time mastectomy and 8 rounds of chemotherapy. Now I am taking Extemestane, probably for 10 years. Good luck to you, stay strong.

      2 months ago
    • lujos' Avatar
      lujos

      Kurious, I did have a double mastectomy this time, also needed a subsequent node clearance , as it had spread to my nodes, it’s a regional recurrence, stage 3 this time. I’m on chemo now...again!

      2 months ago
    • Nanato07's Avatar
      Nanato07

      Kurious, The type of cancer I have now is triple positive, which is completely different than before. Also, I am aware that the cancer can return at anytime and anywhere, but I want to take as many precautions as I can at this point. Since I will need a mastectomy anyway, I would rather go ahead and do both. My Dr. has stated that it's unlikely to return to the other breast, but I felt it was unlikely to return at all yet here I am!! Best of luck to you in this journey. Make decisions based on your personal situation and what is best for you. You will be fine!!

      2 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      I had a lumpectomy, chemo and radiation in 2009. In 2013 had squamous cell carcinoma in my lumpectomy scar, very rare, but caused by rads. Had Mx, then later Mx on other side and reconstruction. March 2018 was diagnosed with metastatic TNBC in my sternum and liver. I have been getting chemo for almost a year. It's working and I usually feel pretty good! Waiting for FDA to approve a targeted therapy, hopefully real soon.
      Always be dilligent about reporting any changes.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      lujos, I was unaware by your first response that you had a double mastectomy. It seems a mastectomy or double mastectomy followed by chemo is choice of treatment after a recurrence. This concerns me because if my biopsy comes back positive, I most likely will not be treated with chemo since I had an allergic reaction to the injection given after chemo to increase white cells. Thanks for responding again. Everyone's response is helping to know what questions I need to ask my oncologist should I need to meet with him again.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      MLT- I'm sorry I don't know what metastatic TNBC means. I hope you are able to keep a positive attitude cause it appears you've been through so much. I guess I'm learning cancer is just so unpredictable. Thanks for responding. Good luck to you.

      2 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      Kurious, metastatic means the breast cancer has spread to other organs. Triple negative means there are no receptors such as estrogen and HER2. Sorry for throwing out the acronyms. Mx is mastectomy.
      Yes, once over the shock, I am usually pretty positive. My friends and family are all getting educated when they take me to chemo. They are surprised that my sessions are light hearted, lots of laughing involved!

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      MLT, is triple negative a good thing?

      2 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      If you have to have BC, it would be better to have some positive receptors. There are meds to take, besides chemo, to help fight the cancer. A book that might help you thru your journey is The Breast Book by Dr Susan Love. Look for the 2015 edition. She explains so much in terms you can understand. I wore out my first copy!
      More research is looking at triple neg now.
      Put up your dukes and fight this! You've got it girl. Live in the present, enjoy your family, friends, and the beauty outdoors. Do what makes you feel good!

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Wonderful advice, and thank you so much for the book referral. I will certainly get a copy. God Bless you and protect you in your journey

      2 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Kurious, in addition to the book MLT recommended, if you call or visit the American Cancer Society, they have a lot of FREE reading material and will mail it to you. I received a Welcome Kit when I first was diagnosed.

      2 months ago
    • Kurious' Avatar
      Kurious

      Barbara- Thank you.

      2 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Your welcome. (Not sure what to say about it being called a "Welcome Kit"----maybe I imagined that!!)

      2 months ago

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