• HelpHELP! Can anyone out there tell me about getting this port implant they want to put in me? Scared

    Asked by Gretchen on Wednesday, April 17, 2013

    HelpHELP! Can anyone out there tell me about getting this port implant they want to put in me? Scared

    Port is for upcoming chemo treatment

    18 Answers from the Community

    18 answers
    • Cindy's Avatar
      Cindy

      It sounded pretty scary to me, at first, also. I had the port put into a vein in my chest under my skin. It was put in as an out-patient in a hospital. It was a little sore for a few days afterward. When getting a chemo treatment, the nurse, put something on it to numb it before inserting the needle. It is easier than getting an IV each time and better for your veins. The nurse can get blood samples from it in addition to administering chemo drugs. Mine was removed after all my chemo treatments were over and I had a CT PET scan that showed no evidence of cancer. I had mine remove in my doctor's office. He numbed the area, made a small incision and then pulled it out. All I felt was a little tugging sensation.

      about 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      I remember feeling terrified like you do right now. But, since getting my port in, I have been grateful for it hundreds of times. Makes chemo, blood draws, etc. a non-event. I'm really glad I have it. Doesn't give me any trouble other than discomfort when my seatbelt rests against that area so I got a padded, wrap-around cushion for seatbelt. During the input procedure I was given "twilight" sedation. I don't remember a thing and I woke up feeling fine. The port will make your life much easier in the long run.

      about 4 years ago
    • KATHYKA1302's Avatar
      KATHYKA1302

      GOD BLESS THE PORT INVENTOR....what a difference...saves time and pain to my already broken body! sorry I didn't get it at the very beginning!

      about 4 years ago
    • fastdog's Avatar
      fastdog

      I have very tiny veins, and love my port. I had two major surgeries, one before the port and one after, and for the first one, all those blood tests every few hours had to come out of my arms. It hurt, and towards the end they couldn't find a place to get blood anymore. With my port, they "accessed" it, meaning they just put a plastic thingy in it that hangs down, and took blood with no muss, no fuss, no pain. Make sure you get a prescription for the benzocain ointment, and an hour or so before they need to access it, just rub the stuff on and there is no pain at all. Putting the port in is simple, outpatient surgery. Eventually, you will be glad you got the port.

      about 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I will jump on in favor of the port, and agree it's a great invention. I have had two, been dx'd 3 times. My first go with cancer and chemo I didn't have one, by the third treatment my veins were getting so hard they couldn't get the needles in.

      After the port was put in it was nice, no more blown veins or sticking in the arm for blood draws.

      Get the port you will be very happy. the surgery is simple to install it, mine was done while I was awake, allthough sedated.

      about 4 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      I can't add much but I too am in favor of the port. The proceedure is a piece of cake. The give you conscious sedation. One that medicine kicks in, you could care less what they're doing to you and don't feel a thing. The port is the way to go.

      about 4 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      Hey there - I wrote a blog post about the experience of getting one... In the end, I had a love hate relationship with the port. It sure made chemo easier... but I wanted it OUT as soon as I was finished. I would definitely get one again....

      Best wishes and good luck!
      Lee

      https://rleepenn.wordpress.com/2011/08/10/port-placement/

      about 4 years ago
    • Hopegirl's Avatar
      Hopegirl

      I have a port that has been in my chest for almost 2 years. At my hospital they do the procedure outpatient in the Interventional Radiology department. i had light sedation, and the procedure didn't take long. No real pain. And I appreciate getting chemo through a port rather than intraveneously. Good luck!

      about 4 years ago
    • Ydnar2xer's Avatar
      Ydnar2xer

      I loved BOTH of my ports--the one-day surgery for each was a breeze--but they didn't love me. I fell on my first one, breaking it in two (the roundy part and the tube separated) and then the second port I had put in caused an infection. My surgeon was astounded at the first one breaking and told me it was "highly unusual" to get an infection from a port as well. All I know is somehow I was lucky enough to get all 5 months of my chemo through them--and only have about 7 more Herceptin infusions ahead of me that must go through my vein! But getting/taking out a port is no big sweat!

      about 4 years ago
    • Irishscott's Avatar
      Irishscott

      Yes, I just had mine put in. Not bad at all. I was very surprised at how well this went. In operating room about 20minutes, out patient home in a couple of hours. So far no issues at all. You may need to buy a bra that has thin straps and more lift from cup. (so that the strap does not push on port). hope this helps. Good luck and you are in my prayers.

      about 4 years ago
    • Gretchen's Avatar
      Gretchen

      Thank you ALL SO SO SOOO much for the answers and support, I'm still really new at this but I can already say I don't know what I would do without you all!! HUGS! -gg

      about 4 years ago
    • anskysue's Avatar
      anskysue

      Port is totally the way to go. What a difference in chemo treatments that they can access it directly. Ask your doctor for a prescription for lidocaine cream. You can put this on an hour or so before they will access your port each time and you will not feel a thing (put a piece of saran wrap over it after you put on the lidocaine to protect your clothes). I had some discomfort for about two weeks after they put it in but I sleep on my stomach so I tossed and turned while trying to find a new sleeping position that was comfortable. Best of luck - the procedure itself is super simple. I was awake for it but didn't feel a thing.

      about 4 years ago
    • anskysue's Avatar
      anskysue

      Port is totally the way to go. What a difference in chemo treatments that they can access it directly. Ask your doctor for a prescription for lidocaine cream. You can put this on an hour or so before they will access your port each time and you will not feel a thing (put a piece of saran wrap over it after you put on the lidocaine to protect your clothes). I had some discomfort for about two weeks after they put it in but I sleep on my stomach so I tossed and turned while trying to find a new sleeping position that was comfortable. Best of luck - the procedure itself is super simple. I was awake for it but didn't feel a thing.

      about 4 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo (Best Answer!)

      They usually place it in your chest, it is an easy out patient procudure, minimal pain, I took pain meds for a couple of days. I didn't have a choice to have a port, the chemo I had to take would have destroyed my veins. After the placement, I was a bit protective of it because if someone pushed on it, it would hurt. All that being said, it became my life line, I grew a strange attachment to it, and although I wanted it out because it signaled the end of my treatments, I was sad to see it go. Now the scar from it is one of my badges of honor. Good Luck!

      about 4 years ago
    • Giraffe's Avatar
      Giraffe

      I love my port . Makes life so much easier for blood work and chemo. My Dr. Indicated it is time to take mine out. Sort of wish I could keep it. Easier than the hand draws. My port comes out Monday.

      about 4 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Another question about ports & PICT lines......
      Were you numbed at the site first, or given some sort of anesthetic while it was implanted?
      Mine was inserted without the benefit of a pain reliever of any sort & it was extremely "ouchy"!
      I asked for something & the team that put it in, refused.
      Would like to hear about others experiences.

      about 4 years ago
    • DaveWaz's Avatar
      DaveWaz

      Gretchen,
      I hope your overall port experience turned out to be a positive one.

      For those of you still seeking information or advice on getting a port for chemo, I have two articles you might want to look at.

      Beginner's Guide - "What is a chemo port?"
      https://www.whatnext.com/cc/What_is_a_Chemo_Port

      Blog Article - "To port or not to port?"
      http://www.whatnext.com/blog/posts/to-port-or-not-to-port-whatnexters-weigh-in-on-chemo-ports

      I hope you find this information useful! As always thank you for your input.
      David

      over 3 years ago
    • dmholt1957's Avatar
      dmholt1957

      I had my port placed when I had my mastectomy so I didn't have to have another surgery. I absolutely loved having the port for my chemo so they wouldn't have to stick my arms all the time. It is a little tender at times but I can handle that. I have had my port since last Feb. I tell people if you don't like looking at my port then don't look at me! I am here and that is all that matters to me!!!

      over 3 years ago

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