• How did you feel after your last round of treatment?

    Asked by ticklingcancer on Tuesday, December 4, 2012

    How did you feel after your last round of treatment?

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I guess that would depend on which last round of treatment. After my last round of chemo, I felt cautiously optimistic because I still had one more miserable week of side effects ahead of me. After my last round of surgeries I was simply ecstatic to be out of the hospital. After my last round of radiation, I was eagerly awaiting for the itching to go away. After my Herceptin treatment, which was just a couple of weeks ago, I was glad I could start making less frequent trips to my oncologist's office. Based on the current plan, my next "last" will be my last dose of Anastrozole, but that is at least 5 years out.

      over 4 years ago
    • KarynBe's Avatar
      KarynBe

      I felt "full," like I was marinated for a few months. It was as if with each round of chemo, it just added to the last one, filling me up. I was tired, not just fatigued, but so tired of not feeling like I was myself. I just wanted to move on. So after that last chemo, when they pulled that needle out, I knew, I was SO done. The radiation treatments took up most of my week. 5 days, traveling 1 hour each way, I took a shuttle from the hospital. I became friends with the other patients. We did a countdown for everyones treatments. Wen it came to my last day, I got a certificate from my doctor, and a round of applause from the waiting room patients. It was definitely a cause for celebration. So we did. I had a party and invited my doctors to join us. Here's my celebration: http://onepinkwarrior.blogspot.com/2011/01/december-6-2008.html

      over 4 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      I never knew it was my last round until well after.

      I had Intraperitoneal chemo, and was scheduled for 8 cycles (every other week). My pain was so severe that they postponed my 6th cycle, but the pain didn't resolve. After about 4-6 weeks of postponements, my dr decided that I would not continue with that treatment, so I only had 5 cycles. I was worried about not completing chemo, so I wasn't happy then, but my dr felt that with the pain I was experiencing, there was a chance that the damage (chemical peritonitis) was greater than the potential benefit at that point.

      Similarly, with my systemic chemo - scheduled 12 cycles every other week. Cutting the dosage after the 6th cycle didn't help; still had very severe side effects with the 7th cycle. A few days before my scheduled 8th cycle, I decided to stop chemo. (I'd also been told that they would never know if the chemo I was receiving was of any benefit to me.)

      I cheered when I got my port(s) out (belly and chest.)

      over 4 years ago
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      AFter surgery, chemo and radiation were all over and done and the anastrozole had just begun, I fell apart and down into a deep hole of depression. I think I had worked so hard to keep on working, being a part of my family, and undergoing treatment that I never had the time to just process everything. It took a lot to climb out of the hole, but here I am, a little more than 4 years later and life feels really good to me now.

      over 4 years ago
    • JennyMiller's Avatar
      JennyMiller

      When I watched that last drop coming out of the bag at my last chemo, I was relieved -- I had completed another hurdle!! When I completed radiation, I was so glad it was the last one as I was getting burned to the point that I would have to be suspended for a healing period. With chemo and radiation completed, I felt a little apprehensive about "laying down those weapons" - but my oncologist advised me that the Arimidex is just as crucial in my battle as the chemo was. So, I still have a weapon in my battle --- and I try to maintain that "positive attitude" which is also vital. All in all -- I have to say it is a relief to have the treatment over -- and when I think back, I have to wonder how the heck I did it!!!!!

      over 4 years ago
    • JMS's Avatar
      JMS

      I felt relieved to be finished (for now, at least) with the treatments, but still a bit apprehensive about what the future might hold. I also needed to focus hard on filling the time proactively, since so much of my time had been taken up for months by going to the hospital for treatments. I'm still experiencing side effects and pain, and am quite weak, but I'm trying to work on building my strength back up and getting back to as close to normal a life as I possibly can. Finishing treatments is a weird feeling, however. Now, I just fight cancer mentally - with my attitude.

      over 4 years ago
    • JMS's Avatar
      JMS

      I felt relieved to be finished (for now, at least) with the treatments, but still a bit apprehensive about what the future might hold. I also needed to focus hard on filling the time proactively, since so much of my time had been taken up for months by going to the hospital for treatments. I'm still experiencing side effects and pain, and am quite weak, but I'm trying to work on building my strength back up and getting back to as close to normal a life as I possibly can. Finishing treatments is a weird feeling, however. Now, I just fight cancer mentally - with my attitude.

      over 4 years ago
    • Rosa's Avatar
      Rosa

      Relieved
      Anxious
      Scared
      Hopeful
      Grateful

      over 4 years ago
    • Carol-Charlie's Avatar
      Carol-Charlie

      Hi tickling - Good Question! Lets see it was December 2006... I'd had my surgery. I'd finished all the six chemo cycles.. consisting of three infusions each. AND had a PET CT Scan to see my status. It showed me Cancer Free. I walked on clouds... literallly, my feet were slightly numb from nerve damage. My hair was growing back I had a fairly good looking crew cut... and it was WHITE!!!! OMG... immagine white hair at 63... :) Anyway.. I'm sitting in the oncologist's office and he starts to share the results of a new treatment out for Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Survivors.... I could feel the corners of my mouth drop.. I remember reaching up to my head (had a wig on, but...) That wonderful man laughed and said.. yes you'll lose your hair again. He said those who were exactly where I was right then had been moitored against those that went on and did one infusion of Chemo a month for 12 months.... More chemo. The more chemo was saving lives! He looked me in the eye when I asked him if I were his mom, would he suggest it. He smiled and said. If you were my mom, I'D MAKE YOU!!! We did the extra year of chemo. BUT when we left his office that afternoon we went out for dinner, and then.. My husband and I went out and bought me a RED wig. I even wore it a few times. I vote cry a bit.. then deal with it. I've had many last days of something over these past 7 years since diagnosis. I finished the second year of chemo. My hair grew back too sparce to wear. Bought really cute wigs. BLONDE. I went every three months to the oncologist's office for blood tests and every six months for internal. Then in October this year... was told I'll move out to six month for blood tests... I really really love life, and thank God and my oncologist for letting me live it. Numb feet from neropathy... slightly numb fingers... bald... (okay peach fuzz hair) but alive. Watching my great grandchildren run around... at Christmas this year for sure. LIFE IS GOOD!!!!

      over 4 years ago
    • Ivy's Avatar
      Ivy

      After the last radiation, there was immense relief, as well as some pain and weakness. Brachytherapy is incredibly invasive, and I hated every second of it.

      After the last chemotherapy, I was even more relieved, but it took quite a toll. Now 3 months later I'm finally walking with more confidence and with a normal gait and speed, without being out of breath. However, I still dreaded the mediport removal surgery, which to me was more of an indicator that treatment was behind me. Getting past that point is truly the best point--from there physically everything is uphill, unless of course, there is a recurrence. I haven't figured out how one deals with that possibility--I don't think it ever truly leaves you. It seems to move to the background, but it's always there. Perhaps this is as good as it gets for all of us and we just have to learn to live with this possibility.

      I read a good book that suggested we all make short- and long-term goals post treatment for these categories: physical healing, emotional healing, and building better support systems. This makes sense to me as treatment requires so much that we all tend to withdraw from much of life during that time. So I'm trying to do these things, and hopefully, over the long-term they will make a real difference in my life.

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I'm still undergoing infusion therapy, but I remember my last day of radiation - I felt beyond exhausted and my breast felt and looked like I had been sun bating topless without any protection, they were red, raw and blistering. But I was also just rally happy to be over with the ordeal.

      over 4 years ago
    • berly462005's Avatar
      berly462005

      Iwas so relieved that it was over but also was very scared of it coming back. I still am but not as bad. It was very weird not to have to go to the oncologists office several times a week.

      over 4 years ago
    • ScrapbookerKay's Avatar
      ScrapbookerKay

      I was so glad treatments were done, yet apprehensive that if they stopped, would it come back? I can do the day to day life routine without it on my mind 24/7, yet I get anxious when it gets close to the time of the next scan.

      over 4 years ago
    • barbeo's Avatar
      barbeo

      Last chemo treatment Today, finished 6th round. Finished 5 weeks of radatation 5 days a week a few months ago. How do I feel gradeful, ecdtatic and very humble.Shot friday to help with bone marrow. blood work Monday,next Dr. App Monday the 31after Christmas.I know that there will be a mainstance program, but I am so thankfull right now I just want to enjoy. My prayers are that there will be others that will have answered prayers as I have. We are in this together. There is power in numbers, and our knowledge of our disease. All are in my prayers

      over 4 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      My last round of treatment sucked! I thought I would be celebrating, but I had to have a biopsy because my scan showed that the chemo wasn't working. So I was in tears because it was supposed to be my last chemo, but I was scheduled for a round of RICE in the hospital, then on to Dana Farber for a stem cell transplant. It turned out after the biopsy that I also have Sarcoids and that is what showed up on the scan

      over 4 years ago
    • mcowett's Avatar
      mcowett

      I had my last round of Chemo on the November 29th, and this week has been XXX!!! I have stopped several times and wondered if it was psychosomatic, like the 1st chemo was the most painful. Everyone has been telling me that the side effects of chemo are kinda cumulative so I have wondered if I really feel this bad or is it just my imagination. On the other hand, I met with the the Rad Onc Wednesday and cried the whole day. Not sure why, felt like the first time I had to discuss chemo - perhaps fear of the unknown - I wanted to feel all happy and elated and celebrate but no such luck. I felt puny and then weepy. Oh Well. . .

      over 4 years ago
    • bp440's Avatar
      bp440

      My husband was a little quiet, knowing he still had another crappy week to get through. It was sort of anticlimactic for both of us. I was relieved as I am anxious for him to get his strength back and to be able to enjoy getting out as he hasn't been able to do much since July. Each day he is starting to see changes for the better. It is a slow process and I hope he can stay patient. The elephant in the room is the follow up scan (results).

      over 4 years ago

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