• How do you keep occupied during chemo? It can take 6 to sometimes 8 hours. I get bored.

    Asked by LisaR on Wednesday, November 15, 2017

    How do you keep occupied during chemo? It can take 6 to sometimes 8 hours. I get bored.

    I take my phone but you can only look at Facebook for so long. What else do you do to keep from going nuts?

    25 Answers from the Community

    25 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Write a Book...

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Did you take anything to read? Do you do any kind of needlework? If not, take crocheting lessons at Michael's and crochet scarves or berets for Christmas, or baby blankets for the hospital nursery or the needy.

      Do they have a TV?

      over 3 years ago
    • Phoenix76's Avatar
      Phoenix76

      Mine was about 6-7 hours also. I brought crocheting, snacks, crossword puzzles, a book, magazines, CDs/player and a pillow/throw to snooze (benadryl was included in the chemo). I also brought a journal to write down my random thoughts. I bugged my nurses with lots of questions, like, "How long does it take for blood to make one circuit through your body?" "How does the port work?" Etc., etc., etc.

      over 3 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Can't imagine spending 6-8 hours on "social media"!
      Get one or two good books.

      over 3 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I took my phone to play with. I also read a whole lot. I generally can't sleep sitting up, so I got LOTS of books read. I was also attached to a pole for 6 - 8 hours.

      over 3 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I can't imagine 6 to 8 hours sitting in "the chair". Mine was over in 20 minutes, 30 tops. But that was years ago before they realized that pre-meds would help, Fluids would help, anti-nausea would help and dripping it slowly would help. Mine was kind of like someone doing that shooting a beer thing. As fast as it could get in me is how fast it went. Sometimes I would complain that it was burning and they would slow it down.

      over 3 years ago
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      Mine were about 6 hours also. I napped because of the bendryl as well. I had my Kindle to play games and read. I also had one of those adult coloring books and some colored pencils and that was fun.

      I had company as well most sessions.

      over 3 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      I would bring a big bag of things to do, books, puzzles, my ipod, but I was given Benedryl through my IV, so I would doze for much of the treatment

      over 3 years ago
    • buckhunter's Avatar
      buckhunter

      I have asked grandkids to come with me, the older ones will have the patience to sit and talk. I have learned more about them during our hours-long chats than I ever have before. And they also have asked questions about where I grew up and some of our distant relatives, I believe they have learned things about our family that they wouldn't have known before., Other than that, I have a combination of the things that have already been listed. Sometimes it looks like I'm moving in when I show up.

      over 3 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      My center had more beds than chairs and because I was so sick that I was almost always scheduled for a bed. My center also had appointments during chemo. I had appointments; with the nutritionist to adjust the formula for the feeding tube, with the counselors, and even my Dr.'s PA. We had Televisions so I watched the Food Network. My center also provided snacks and for those with a lengthy chemo a lunch was provided. With all the distractions, I slept most of the time

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      I always have things at home I've put aside to read when I get time. . . . Magazine articles are often online, too. Make a list of things you want to know (fun things, not like schoolwork), and do a search, depending on who you want to look up, where you want to travel to, etc. Shop for Christmas gifts online---even better, order gifts so you won't have to go to stores!

      TV shows are often online now if you've missed any episodes, or if you want to binge watch a different show. Lowes or Home Depot have DIY videos online at their websites, plus a list of one-hour DIY classes they do on Saturdays.

      If they don't have a TV, it might be worth taking a small flat screen with you. Best Buy has a 24 inch LG for $99 right now, and others even cheaper. If there is a TV, rent a movie or two from Redbox and take a DVD player for their TV, or you can use a laptop to watch a movie.

      Have fun!

      over 3 years ago
    • artsylady's Avatar
      artsylady

      During chemo, I became hooked on Ancestry.com. It's $19.99 a month and it really made the time fly for me. If you've never used Ancestry.com, it's a very tedious process looking at old documents and thousands of hits when you type in a name. I'm 64, my mom is 97 and has Alzheimer's. She can no longer tell me about her mother who died when I was 8 weeks old in 1953. She cannot tell me about my grandfather who died when she was 22. My father died 20 years ago, and his parents died before I was born. I realized I knew so very little even about my grandparents, and I want to give information to my sons who are 26 and 28. They may not care now, but they will one day.

      Anyway, I don't mean this as an advertisement for Ancestry.com, but any type of research really makes time fly for me. I now have information about all my great-grandparents, including photos that distant cousins uploaded. I found a photo of my paternal grandfather and grandmother in 1898 on their wedding day and my youngest son is the spitting image (seriously creepy spitting image) of his great grandfather. Discoveries like that makes the tedium worth while. I'm not nearly complete with my 'family tree' but I hope to eventually find information on when my ancestors arrived in this country from Germany and Wales.

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      ArtsyLady, I agree and almost added that to my post! Hours can speed by when you are going through Ancestry.com, and then you have something to share with family.

      over 3 years ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      Download the App 'Crackle' for free movies and tv...remember your earbuds.

      over 3 years ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      I usually read a book on my phone our watch a movie on my kindle. I'm thinking about getting my newly diagnosed mom a kindle for when she has to go in for infusions or is stuck in hospital.

      over 3 years ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      @artsylady we found out about a cousin who'd drowned in the creek behind the family home in Washington state back in the 1890s. Ancestry.com is very interesting!

      over 3 years ago
    • raysmith45's Avatar
      raysmith45

      Take your laptop, newspaper, a book, a memo book to write in, magazines and other like materials. There's music to listen to, movies and other videos to watch, research and planning to do. My wife was with me during chemo sessions (8 hours) and we spent the time together.

      over 3 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I play online games. The time speeds by. I am only there for 2 - 3 hours, but electronic books, the news, my games, WhatNext ... my time flies by.

      Good luck!

      over 3 years ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I mostly slept because of the benedryl. Sometimes I would be well enough to crochet or knit during the six hours in the chair. I would also take magazines that would come in the mail and hold them until chemo day before reading. I would also bring snacks and drinks. When I went down to just Herceptin, it was done in two hours. Then I didn't bring too much to keep me busy ad then when I was done i would treat myself to frozen custard from Culver's which was just a few blocks from chemo center.

      over 3 years ago
    • LisaR's Avatar
      LisaR

      Thank you all, these are all some great ideas!

      over 3 years ago
    • 9Nehrs' Avatar
      9Nehrs

      Adult color book has helped me get through.

      over 3 years ago
    • Leo4life's Avatar
      Leo4life

      my chemo always made me sleep so I brought a pillow and cozy blanket

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Hey, LisaR, I have an eccentric question if it's OK: You can't be an only child---how many kids were in your family, and how many people are in your current household? (I'm asking to see if you fit the theory that only children never get bored because they're used to being alone, and that people who are used to being with people don't know what to do alone.)

      over 3 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Hey Barb,
      Good comment!
      I rarely get bored, & am an only child & enjoy being alone. I would go nuts if constantly surrounded by a bunch of loud chattering people! I have friends who have huge families and don't know how they manage to keep their sanity, but I guess, it's what you're brought up with.

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Me, too, Molly! I look forward to being alone to do my "stuff" and I never get around to everything. I thought I'd organize all my photographs when I retired and still haven't done that, plus other things, like reading!

      over 3 years ago

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