• how long does my father have to live

    Asked by Jaimie on Tuesday, September 16, 2014

    how long does my father have to live

    He was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year, and he had his prostate removed along with radiation. This year we found out he has a large tumor in his back and the cancer has metasitisized to his bones, upper and lower back.

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • alimccalli's Avatar
      alimccalli

      Not really something we can answer for you - even cancer patients with same type and staging are different, and so many things play into that question...have you talked to his oncologist about his condition to see what the prognosis is?

      So sorry that your dad is going through this. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family...

      almost 7 years ago
    • amontoya's Avatar
      amontoya

      No one can answer this question. I think a lot of people fall into a rut when they've been diagnosed with a life threatening illness. When a doctor says you have 6 months to live, people automatically freak out and focus on the end instead of what's in the middle. Your Dad has an unknown amount of time just like the rest of us. Try to focus on the present and spending as much time with your Dad as possible. Don't forget, as healthy as you are, you don't know how much time you have either. Best wishes to you and your Dad.

      almost 7 years ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Hi Jaimie - without more information we can't begin to speculate on how long your Dad may have.
      And even then, people often rally and far outlive what their doctors predict.

      I'm so sorry that you even have to contemplate this question - my heart goes out to you and your family.

      almost 7 years ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      Hi Jaime, As the others have said, no one can say for sure. However, I would talk with his doctors about their predictions and what is the "normal" course. This would give you some idea of what you may expect. Also, you may want to know when it may be time for hospice care. I hope you will find support & comfort while your father makes this journey.

      almost 7 years ago
    • lilymadeline's Avatar
      lilymadeline

      Only God knows the answer to your question. But I also have metastasized cancer in my bones from breast cancer, skull to toes. Every single one of my ribs has at least one bone lesion, it is all over my spine and pelvis, ugh!
      He isn’t very old at 62, people can live for years with metastasized cancers now, especially in their bones. Decades even! It all depends on how he keeps responding to his cancer treatments. If they can control the cancer and keep it at it’s current level or push it back a bit.
      But if it spread since last year he will need treatment of some sort now to control it, ask his oncologist what his options are. I don’t have this type of cancer, but I think it might be hormone treatments of some sort or even chemo. I was on chemo pills myself for 4 years with good quality of life, it is definitely doable!
      And because his cancer has spread, now is the time to take him to another hospital or cancer center for a second and possibly a third opinion. Medicine really is an art, and different oncologist can approach the same problem in different ways. Getting a second opinion will either give him confidence and reenforce that his current treatment plan is a good one, or it will give him a better option or two better options! So you really can’t lose by seeing other doctors and getting their viewpoints!
      And please don’t forget about what he can do himself to take care of his body and extend his life, a healthy diet, daily exercise, and a good night’s sleep are just as important as any cancer medication that he is on. BTW- I’m not talking about running marathons! Just walking around the block, stretching, stuff like that is great for him. Lifting heavy objects with bone mets is not a good idea of course! And if there is a cancer support community anywhere hear him they will have a selection of free exercise classes designed for cancer patients in treatment. Good luck and God bless! Hugs!

      almost 7 years ago
    • Keith59's Avatar
      Keith59

      Only god knows.....prayers of comfort healing and peace.

      almost 7 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN (Best Answer!)

      My dad had prostate cancer for about 14 or 15 years and everything was just fine. Then he started losing weight and couldn't keep food down. That went on for several months with him losing a lot of weight. We kept going to the doctor and getting several tests, they just said it was progressing rapidly. At that point they were going to do a surgery and insert a PEG tube so he could get some nutrition, when doing some more tests they told us that his had spread to bladder, pelvis and lungs and that we should take him home and put him in hospice. His time was stated as 2 weeks to 6 months. That's a wide range! He lived about a month after that point. But, he was very advanced by then. I hope this is not the case for you, we all wish you both the best.

      almost 7 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      What does your dad's doctor say? Many people live a long time with prostrate cancer, but others don't. Are your dad's tumors responding to treatments or have they begun? Give your dad a hug and enjoy every day you are blessed with. I hope it the days will turn into years!

      almost 7 years ago
    • Jaimie's Avatar
      Jaimie

      Thank you all so much for the input, prayers and hugs. It really means allot to me for you all to share your stories with me. It makes me feel as though I am not alone in going through something similar to me and my Father. I am just scared because he declined overnight. Last week he was being treated with his first two rounds of radiation, he was walking and laughing, and this week he can't walk, can hardly talk, cannot swallow to well and he has pneuomonia, plus a bacteria in his blood, and also the latest news is that the cancer has spread to his liver.

      almost 7 years ago
    • KimberlynJ's Avatar
      KimberlynJ

      Jaimie, I am so sorry that your Dad is so very sick. My brother's very first chemo treatment landed him in the ICU for a whole month, I was sure it was the end. But he rallied and has had a really good year!

      Then there was a patient we met at our onc that was just diagnosed with SCLC and they hit him with everything: major radiation, chemo. When we met him, after his initial 2 weeks of treatment, he was on oxygen, in a wheelchair, couldn't talk... it was terrifying for his wife!! We met again each week as my husband was receiving his chemo treatments, this man was looking better and better!! Walking in, chatting with us, animated and happy. Could hardly believe it was the same guy!!

      I pray this is that kind of set back and your Dad rallies and improves dramatically after this scare. It's so hard and you probably feel so helpless. If you're the praying type; give it up to God - the Great Physician!! I am praying for strength, hope and health for you and your whole family. ~Kim

      almost 7 years ago
    • TomC's Avatar
      TomC

      A Danish study published in the Journal of Urology July 2010Volume 184, Issue 1, Pages 162–167 state that the survival rates for Prostate Cancer is 47% and 3% in those with bone metastasis. If there is a skeletal related event one and 5-year survival was 40% for one year and less than one percent for five years. You described a skeletal related event so according to the Danish study he would have the lower survival rate.

      I understand this is lack of precision is frustrating because I too have metastatic prostate cancer in the bone (pelvis and spine.)

      Source: http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(10)03011-9/abstract

      over 6 years ago

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