• I am filled with anxiety now that treatment for triple negative breast cancer is complete. I have only read about recurrences and not many women's positive experiences! How do I live my life without constant worry now?

    Asked by tara4129 on Friday, September 15, 2017

    I am filled with anxiety now that treatment for triple negative breast cancer is complete. I have only read about recurrences and not many women's positive experiences! How do I live my life without constant worry now?

    I can honestly say that I have been very positive and hopeful throughout my treatments but its the period now during remission that is giving me the most anxiety.. Especially when my oncologist told me if cancer comes back it would be incurable..

    57 Answers from the Community

    57 answers
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      Take heart in the ongoing research, improvements in protocol for triple negative are happening. That is one thing I keep in mind. Anyone who has survived has this intermittent pinging of fear. Find what soothes you, be mindful of the riches of everyday events. Take time for you. Life is temporary for everyone, we have the privilege of truly encompassing that fact. Be as well as you can be, I wish you much love.

      almost 4 years ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      I know just how you feel. As much as we want treatment to be over, it is frightening when it is. I don't think the anxiety ever truly leaves us. I have found that with time, it is not constantly on my mind. Try not to let it consume your life. Start doing things that you enjoyed before your diagnosis that maybe you didn't the energy to do during. Also, make quiet time just for you so you can heal. It is too bad that your doctor made that comment, because there are always new drugs and treatment on the horizon. Try to stay positive. Good luck. Take care.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Carol1286's Avatar
      Carol1286

      It's been four and a half years since my diagnosis. It does get easier with each passing year. If cancer returns, I'll deal with it then.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Jouska's Avatar
      Jouska

      This time period, post treatment, is very difficult for most of us who have gone through bc treatment. We have been in active treatment, we have been monitored, met with our oncologist every 3 weeks (or more) and now we are to just go merrily on our way and not worry. And so every ache or pain becomes a worry - could it be back??!! It is a very uncomfortable and strange period. The best advice I got was the "two week" rule. Which is essentially not to worry about potential symptoms unless they last at least two weeks. And amazingly most don't. And most are aches or pains we would have shrugged off in our previous life. The hard part of breast cancer is that if it metastasizes, it is incurable. However, long term treatment continues to improve our odds, but yes, that is scary. I liked Carol1286 comment. It does get easier and if it returns, deal with it then. But don't lose the current quality of your life by worrying about it.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I was diagnosed w/stage IV endometrial cancer in Aug 2012. Stats at the time said I had a 15% chance of sitting here typing this out today. Yet, I'm sitting here typing this out... One day at a time. If the anxiety gets too bad, contact your doctor. I still have a prescription for Ativan -- don't take it often, but the occasional night when the stupid hamster won't get off the stupid wheel in my brain...

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I don't care what type of cancer a person has, there is always the anxiety and fear of reoccuring cancer and cancer from the treatment. Congressman Steve Schiff, NM-R, had a stage 1 SCC on the tip of his ear that was caught early. They did chemo-just for precaution, as he was an active Congressman. Less than 2 years later he was buried, with a body that was ravaged by cancer. Several oncologists and oncological clinics in Europe and Israel were part of his team.

      While the above is extremely rare--It happens. Everyone gets active treament for their type of cancer. Everyone is monitored to try to keep them from being another Steve Schiff. Lung cancer kills more women than breast cancer. I'm not putting down BC patients, but there are more BC survivors than other types of cancers, because BC gets more funding.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Hbee68's Avatar
      Hbee68

      I too have had anxiety after finishing my treatment for my triple negative breast cancer- on top of that mine is a rare form of it with an extremely high recurrence rate- so I started seeing a therapist and I am on meds for my anxiety. I walk daily and focus on eating right which gives me some semblance of control (HA!). I live by the two week rule as well which helps given the remaining side effects from chemo. For a while there I was a hot mess right after treatment ended. Everyday I felt like I was just waiting for IT to return. I mentioned to my oncologist and to my therapist that there isn't enough after care for survivors and they both agreed. Lucky for sites like this one and I do get other support online. Everyday I remind myself I am here and I have to enjoy the now. Not the what if's. And if what if happens- I will deal with it then.

      almost 4 years ago
    • gailfitz's Avatar
      gailfitz

      I too had anxiety after finishing my treatment in 2014 for TNBC. I found out in November 2016 that it is now in my bones. Started pill form chemo in December 2016 and shots every 6 weeks to make the bones stronger. So far it is working. Per my oncologist they are coming out with new info and trails every week. Try and stay strong. I tell myself every day that I WILL ALSO BEAT THIS.
      I really believe that a positive out look ( which is hard to do ) helps. If your anxiety gets to bad ask your doctor for a prescription to help you out. I have a wonderful team at St. Barnabas in Livingston NJ. Some days are hard. How ever I try to leave my new normal life as much as possible and planning a vacation to Ireland next year.If your doctors are not helping you it my be time for a new doctor. Hopefully you will never have that problem. keeping you in my prayers.

      almost 4 years ago
    • junie1's Avatar
      junie1

      totally understand the anxiety about what happens now that treatment is over,, but if you have a great team of doctors,, and see them regularly,, they are the people to keep asking the questions and concerns.. My daughter has triple neg breast cancer,, and she says she concentrates on her family, and work, and believes in the Lord to help her thur this.I
      I had cancer in 1994,, all went well,, in 2014 I was DX again!! this time it was stage 4 breast cancer,, and I live most of my time knowing that all will be ok. I can not undo what has been done. only be positive in my thinking and well being.. I know that most health situations can be taken care of.. it's the other things in life that I have no control over.
      Please find that we here on WhatNext will help you out any way we can.
      LIke I said,, talk to your doctors,, or find the support group in your area or if there's one at the treatment center,,, going to Moffitt was ggreat for me,, lots of support there,, with doctors to talk to. helped me a lot, when I didn't really want to have the help,, they was there,, and I am greatful for it.
      Triple neg cancer is nothing the pass off lightly,, I wish you lots of prayers.

      almost 4 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Here's my question to you: what good does it do to worry? Will worrying cause the cancer to stay away? (No, but it does cause stress and stress is said to be related to cancer)

      For me (stage 4 lung cancer, forever under treatment and likely will ultimately succumb to it), worry takes the joy of today. I can't worry about what's in the future because i have absolutely no control over it.

      I am personally a Christian and my faith helps me a lot as well. For me, i know that God has this and, in the end, His will will be done. I take comfort in this. If you are not a Christian, i understand this is not comforting nor meaningful to you. (I am not preaching, merely stating what gives me personally peace.)

      And, here's more ... people mostly surviive breast cancer. There is tons of money thrown to your disease for research. Huge strides have been made and more and more and more of you are benefiting from it. So, even if there is a recurrence, and I pray there is not, there will be new and better treatment options available.

      Good luck. Keep up a healthy lifestyle, maintain a happy attitude, enjoy your life one day at a time, keep up with your regular doctor visits ... and LIVE!!!!

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      LiveWithCancer is telling the truth about so many things. Breast cancer is an emotional thing where people really donate- and all aspects of cancer are well funded.

      Mammogram every year for prevention. Smokers aren't even treated that well to prevent lung cancer. My husband kept asking for an X-Ray for his lungs. After years and years, he fell and broke his shoulder. They X-Rayed him to set that and found advanced lung cancer. Then they tried to treat him, but he died in less than a year. But he didn't smoke and the military and Medicare didn't think that a X-Ray was appropiate. They don't act that way to a woman with a lump on a boob. Nobody with any type of cancer is lucky-but you have the type- Breast cancer with the most availiable resources, and the most money spent on research, which is what LiveWith is talking about.

      Then you have the support groups-which are highly centered around breast Cancer-not on anything else.

      Even if you aren't a Christian- life is handled pretty well on a binary level. Yes or No. I woke up this morning. I am alive- so the answer is Yes-Positive. My world was-Will I die soon from this if left untreated-Yes by 5 doctors at 4 clinics--
      standard treatment-NO it would be dragged out and die less than 5 years. Any quality of life-NO-was that worth it for me NO
      Expermental treatment--I would die soon from the cancer or treatment- So the question was- Did I have anything to lose/? NO If it worked-would I have good quality of Life? YES.
      So it did work and I have a good quality of life.

      For me, I had a rare incurable--you don't have any idea what it's like to talk to medical staff that don't eveen know the problems in having to bend the head even a little bit--dizzy, super headache, etc. Then if a person has a throat, lung, nose-mouth cancer-- that is usually blamed
      on smoking-tobacco-alcohol- I'm innocent f that and I don't like being treated poorly because of stupidity--Breat cancer patients are usually nutured- Big difference.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      I understand the seriousness of triple negative, I too have a more aggressive form with a higher rate of recurrence. I do pay attention to triple negative & her2 (mine) as I have a relative with triple negative so I keep her supplied with research information as it becomes available. I also collect information on her2 (protocol changes/trials) for myself so should the need arise I have information to help me be my own advocate. That is one thing you can do as a positive.

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I so agree with you Lindy.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      I also pay attention to you Meyati, always smart sharing.

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Sometimes I'm not so smart, especially when I have something like Whooping Cough-I'm not so nice. Believe it or not- I'm doing pretty well right now.-No mumps--no measles- No lockjaw nor Whooping Cough--decent doctors-I finally got them trained LOL

      We all are joined by fear and anxiety--but those of us that have well-known and well-treated cancers are ahead of the others. Some of us live in areas with excellent doctors and treatments. Some of us have better insurance coverage than others. Some have good support. Some people have good luck--others don't. Looking back at Congressman Steve Schiff, R-NM

      We need to realise that people are trying to encourage them by pointing out the positives, and letting them know if they aren't alone. Being a living rare patient- there is a certain amount of loneliness--I think that cancer causes a certain amount feeling lonely anyway.

      I am just so glad that I'm not a MD Anderson Cancer patient getting any type of care in Houston. I'm glad that I'm not sick in Florida.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I had a different cancer but I was convinced the Universe would not allow me to suffer the agonies of treatment only to punish me again.

      Breathe deeply and live as well as you are able. Get yourself stronger.

      Best wishes

      almost 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have survived stage IV esophageal cancer for 7 years. I also have survived an aggressive stage III uterine cancer for 4 1/2 years. When I was diagnosed with the uterine cancer there were esophageal tumors present. The Dr. told me that I had a I% chance of surviving for 18 months. Right now what disturbs my sleep is reading the news.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I try to live a healthy lifestyle, and other wise I just say I feel cured therefore I am cured. I am 75 years old. In March, I got a small trust fund. I turned it into an annuity that will last until I am 95, I am planning my 100 birthday.

      almost 4 years ago
    • LeslieR's Avatar
      LeslieR

      I am a 6 year survivor of TNBC this month! I think this year, the 6th year, I've finally moved on and have put the anxiety and fear behind me. I am here to testify that life is good. I married my best friend after 18 years, I found a rewarding job helping others, my children are happy, healthy, productive young men, I have the support of old and new friends, and most importantly I have my faith. I pray for others and myself, and I will keep you in my prayers as well.

      almost 4 years ago
    • katiefnp's Avatar
      katiefnp

      I had TNBC stage IIIb in 2013. Treated with chemo, dbl mastectomy and radiation.
      Then in 2015 found 3 painful, mobile tumors. I was told by my primary oncologist, and my breast surgeon they were "just fatty necrotic areas/masses, from radiation, surgery, healing".
      I kept at it. I knew something was wrong. I felt sick as he**. A few months later, my biopsy came back. It was a recurrence. Another TNBC cancer stage IIIb. I had a port placed again, more chemo, surgery and guess what. More radiation in and over the first 33 treatments of radiation. I thought you couldn't be radiated again, over the same area twice? I had the director of a very big US cancer institute take my case this second time. I am living to tell the tale. I believe that I'm free of cancer now. You just have to keep fighting and going. If I am ever in the sad, sad place one day, as these brave and ordinarily courageous women who shared their stage IV status here with us, may I only be so gracious.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      1. Re-read the reply from LiveWithCancer. It's exactly how I feel. (Does worrying cause your cancer to stay away?)

      2. Do you worry about being killed in a car accident every time you get into a car?

      3. Talk to your Primary Car Physician about your anxiety, and get a referral to a counselor and/or a prescription for anxiety. Look for a support group to go to and meet new friends.

      Best wishes.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Barbara, I have always worried about being killed in an auto accident as much as I worried about cancer still do. Cab drivers have even noticed this fear. Last night, I had a sleepless night worrying about nuclear war.
      One thing I have found out is that I worry less about cancer since diagnosis than I worried about it before.

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Boise-do they drive as fast up there as they do here? 10 to 20 miles over the speed limit most of the time in the city? Freeways and highways are much faster---

      The Freeway that runs from Sacramento, CA to Bakersfield, CA-- about 120 mph Drive 90 and everybody honks at you and the school busses are speeding by--Been back there this century--

      almost 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Meyati, the cab drivers here are better than any member of my family. That being said it is a very low bar indeed. In fact one of the thing I dread about scans is getting in the car or cab to go to them. Perhaps that is why I am so prone to motion sickness

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Boise-maybe the motion sickness affects being in motion.. Scans are horrible--This last one was nice because they treated me like a free sane adult human. I told them that I didn't want the pillow thing under my knees--OK with a smile---That I throw up if I fast-- the Iodine tears my stomach up and convulses-and they are doing my HEAD. I dreaded the fights and bossy lectures---

      almost 4 years ago
    • fiddler's Avatar
      fiddler (Best Answer!)

      tara4129

      I was diagnosed with TNBC in January 2013. They threw the kitchen sink at it (because it's untreatable) and had me go through 33 rounds of radiation. Everyone crossed their fingers.

      TNBC is the most aggressive breast cancer in the book. I was diagnosed 4 years ago. Yes, recurrance is 22% in the 1st 3 years and 15% after 5 years. Yes, mostly it recurs in the lungs, liver and brain. Yes, when it recurs the chances of survival are very very slim.

      REFRAME IT to a positive ... if you survive 3 years your survival rate is around 78%, at 5 years your survival rate goes up to something like 85%. There's research going on now and trials for Stage IV - years before we will have access to an effective tx.

      Also, a research oncologist told me that as time goes by the chances of TNBC recurrence are less and less, whereas chances of the other types of breast cancer recurring are more and more. We're the opposite, so there's another positive.

      During the 1st year after tx I thought everyday that TNBC would return. During the 2nd year I thought about recurrance every other day. At 4 years out, I hardly think about it - just when I'm stressed too much, or, because I get calcifications from the radiation and have a mammo every 6 months, a month before I'm due for a mammo the thoughts and anxiety return, but a wee bit less each time.

      Besides a positive spin on it, try interrupting the thoughts. I don't know if this will work. Maybe, to get recurrence off your mind, interrupt the thought by getting up from the chair (or sofa, etc.) and getting a glass of water, by snapping a rubber band that you put around your wrist - that sort of thing. Every time the reaction arises, interrupt the thought.

      Other than that, pray, notice and appreciate each moment. There's a FREE mindfulness course - https://palousemindfulness.com. That site has vids of yoga, tai chi, etc., and teaches the mindfulness technique. It's an excellent site. It helped me to let go of the worries.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      BoiseB and Meyati, I dread driving on the interstate when you're made to change lanes and people don't want to let you over, but driving around town on streets doesn't bother me.

      I usually feel bad after a scan, too. Years ago the CT Department had told me I had to fast 5 hours, then they got better tasting liquid to drink, and this year they have something new that I have to fast ONLY 2 hours---I don't know if they changed the liquid I drink or if it's what goes into the I.V, but I also don't feel as bad afterward.

      All that to say they've told me they bought new stuff, so wherever you go has options also. (I bet the old stuff was cheaper to buy.) If you can get somebody to call them to see what the name of the substance they changed is, which only requires a 2 hour fast, it's the Outpatient CT Lab at the Kirklin Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (not at the University Hospital) General operator number is 2 0 5 8 0 1 8 0 0 0

      They told me they had a lot of complaints about the old stuff, so they listened. Let me know if complaining works for you!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      Fasting makes me so woozy I require a driver, hope this new 2 hour is for everyone!

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I don't fast, as it's my head being scaned. I just don't go in chewing on a Sub. I was told to fast the first time- I did- the Iodine hit my stomach- burned it and i puked all over the machine. I told them that would happen.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Lindy, it's not for everyone unless your clinic buys the different liquid or drug that got changed. I would request it beforehand, because of course they have to order it.

      My scans are of my abdomen, chest, and lungs, so I don't know how they see my digestive system now (after eating 2 hrs before). I used to have to go home and go to bed after a scan, and I haven't had to do that with the new stuff, thank goodness.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      My scans are full torso so this shall be interesting, I am hopeful. Thanks for the information.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Scans used to give me diarrhea for three days. Then one time I almost lost it on the table. The tech said "Why didn't you tell us? We can see if the Dr. will order a different contrast. This one you drink just before the scan and you don't have to wait the 45 minutes. You also have extra IV time. It tastes just as terrible (worse in my book). My Dr. felt that the other contrast was more detailed but since these are just routine scans this one was ok. I had the old kind when I had an obstructed bowel but I really sick anyway

      almost 4 years ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      I know how you feel. People thought I was crazy but it was so much easier when I was in treatment. I felt like I was doing something. The going about my business and hoping it doesn't come back was so much harder. I finally decided to live my life not my cancer like everyone says. I started making plans and doing some of the things on my bucket list. Last month i went to Atlanta and saw the Braves play in their new stadium. In a few weeks I am going to Colorado and see my son and daughter in law's new house. It has really helped. I can finally begin to feel like this new normal isn't so bad.

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      Thank you so much to everyone that responded to my question/concerns! I've never been involved in a forum and I'm so touched by the care of all of your answers. I will try my hardest to follow these suggestions and LIVE my life instead of stress about it! It's still very fresh so I know it will take some time to get there.
      I would love to "pay it forward" somehow for others.. my support system has been huge.
      Thank you again for helping me work through all of my "head stuff" ; )

      almost 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      You're so sweet Tara. Just keep talking to us, encouraging us, giving your advice- and your opinion- and most of all let us know how you are doing--

      Hugs--

      almost 4 years ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      It is a roller coaster so when you hit a blip be kind to yourself and get emotional support. We are all here for each other.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Tara, I don't have what you have, but I have been Class IV for four years. Many of us have lived for years as Class IV patients and are thankful and happy for it!

      Remember that worrying doesn't cause the cancer to stay away, so you might as well not worry and enjoy your life. I look at it as I dodged a bullet in 2002 (breast) and 2013 (stomach) and lived some EXTRA years because I got treatment, so everything else is just icing on the cake!

      Best wishes! Be sure and talk about this with your Primary Care physician. Anxiety sometimes has a physical cause and needs medicine.

      almost 4 years ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Tara - my stage IV ovarian cancer came back last summer and I am currently NED (no evidence of disease) again after surgery and chemo. I understand the worry of a recurrence but it will either come back or it won't. Worrying is only stealing joy from the time you have now.

      As far as your doctor telling you if you have a recurrence it will be incurable, I think he/she is doing you a huge disservice as well as discounting medical advances to an incredible degree. In fact, I'd change doctors in your position. I want someone who will partner with me to extend my life, not be a Debbie Downer.

      In your place, I would do everything to prevent a recurrence. Get to an optimal weight, exercise or walk, eat sensibly, try supplements like turmeric or even cbd oil if you want. Juicing and plant-based diets can be tough on some people but you can always add more fruits and vegetables to your diet. Look at it as stacking the deck in your favor. Those are all things you can control.

      Hang in there! We're all here for you and we can help you overcome your worries if they get too heavy to manage alone.

      almost 4 years ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      by the way, at the time of my diagnosis, I Googled the statistics for longterm survival with my cancer at stage IV (I know, big mistake) and saw that I had a 12% chance of being alive in 5 years. Well, I've made it almost four years now and plan to be here for many more. So, unless you came stamped with an expiration date, just remember, we don't know how long we have and neither do our healthcare professionals.

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      Thank you Kalindria! You sound like you have been through a lot and are one strong lady! I will try very hard to stay positive- I think you're right though... I wish my doc hadn't said those words as they keep replaying in my head "incurable"! I don't need someone to sugar coat things but I do need the positives!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Razmataz's Avatar
      Razmataz

      The first series of Chemo I went through 2.5 yrs ago when it was completed... I felt like I was completed too. I was drained physically and emotionally more than ever before in my life. Tears which were rare before were a constant experience. I too was positive all through the chemo, blood clots, and hospital stays but once it was all over I was somehow left in great anxiety. Can't really say what I did to get over it... I was told by alot of different types of medical people that "when the cancer comes back..." I would try to block the thought out. Then I began to just accept the fact that it probably would come back and I may or may not beat it the second or third time so I tried to figure out what was important to me now... In the moment...on this very day. Then in my mind I switched my thinking from how unfortunate it was that I have this horrible cancer to wow, I'm fortunate. Many people don't get the opportunity to re-evaluate their life and priorities before they die...I get that choice. My cancer did come back and I quickly finished putting things in order then accepted that maybe I would die but until then I'm making memories and living life. Yes the anxiety is in the back of the mind but trying to be in the moment helps me... Wish you the best...

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Tara1429, you should ask your doctor EXACTLY what he meant when he said if yours comes back, it will be "incurable." Could you be paraphrasing? "Incurable" isn't usually used about cancer, because it's a given that it's never curable----I've never heard of a doctor saying it IS curable, because you can have cancer cells in your system after treatment that show up later. (I hope that didn't confuse you!)

      When they say there's no evidence of disease, they only mean they have no "evidence" of disease, not that you don't have any cancer cells.

      Many of us live many years after Stage IV diagnosis because of our treatments, so you need to clarify with him what he meant. Don't worry, but keep getting monitored for early diagnosis, which is the key to feeling like everything is as good as it can be!

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      She actually did say those words- "if your cancer came back its incurable"
      When I asked her to clarify that she said if it came back it's going to one or more places like organs, bones etc which they would still give chemo for but just to prolong your life.
      Now you see where my anxiety came from? ; )

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      Jouska- when you answered that every ache and pain you wonder if it's back.. I've been catching myself doing that lately.. I've had a persistent headache for 5 days. I'll sometimes think- is it just the stress and anxiety after my follow up appointment of is it brain cancer?!! I've never had paranoia/worry like this!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Jouska's Avatar
      Jouska

      Tara4129 you are absolutely right that none of us have had worry like this before. Cancer changes you. But you can keep it from controlling you. Before cancer, what would you have done about your headache? Whatever it is, do that. If that doesn't work or your headache persists over two weeks - get it checked out.

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      I probably would have popped a Tylenol and realized I wasn't drinking enough water! ; )
      It's a vicious circle though isn't? Stress probably causing the headache but now even more stressed out because the headaches aren't going away! Cancer sucks! It is taking the logic and calmness out of me and replacing it with nerves and worry!!

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      Sorry everyone- I just realized how whiney and uninspired I just sounded! I swear I'm not usually this negative.., wanting this worry stage to be done with! I am working on it though!!!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Jouska's Avatar
      Jouska

      You are working it out. A major step is realizing you are not alone and you are going through something almost all of us have gone through. Your reaction is totally normal. Hugs. This too shall pass.

      almost 4 years ago
    • tara4129's Avatar
      tara4129

      Thanks Jouska- means a lot!

      almost 4 years ago
    • Razmataz's Avatar
      Razmataz

      Tara4129 Jouska really is right. We all have been here or are there with you. I will even tell myself outloud or to the dr...probably nothing but needed to get it checked out just so I feel better and stop worrying... Voicing your fears and concerns has nothing to do with being positive in my opinion. I am a pretty upbeat positive person stuck in the reality that cancer sucks and doesn't discriminate. I know, as a cancer patient that I might over react...I also know that those over reactions might and has saved my life. I'm not really sure that incurable and prolonging can go hand in hand. I've been mulling that around in my mind. I know with the kind of cancer I got...it has come back in a different place. Removed once again by surgery. It will come back again at some point. I will continue to have "maintenance" chemo the rest of my life. So is that incurable and prolonging or ??? I don't know. The maintenance chemo has few side effects fatigue some nausea sometimes but thats really it. I am not dying...I can still be involved in my child's life...and hopefully if I am blessed with the opportunity I will be able to help him transition into adulthood and independence. For me thats all I care about. What I'm trying to say is I don't think the dr's statement was completely accurate and I would either do or ask someone to do research for you on it... When I first got my cancer, there really was little chemo's that are effective for it. When it came back the government had just released a "new" chemo that is suppose to be more effective for sarcoma's. I jumped at the opportunity to try it. So just believe for the best while being realistic. We have no control about wether it will come back but lots of control on what we are going to do today/now. I went from totally independent, strong physically and mentally balancing many roles, working fulltime being a single mom to cancer patient, little to no strength at time (my son would have to even open my water bottles for me), retired due to disability, small spurt of energy (use to be ADHD) etc. Its an adjustment. So Tara hang in there, allow yourself to feel anxious and be concerned. Reality no one really knows how much time any of us have here... hugs

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      @tara4129.

      Please mention to your doctor/prophet/oracle that he might as well give you a referral to a new doctor now because IF cancer should return, he has already explained that you would THEN need a better doctor with whom you might have a chance.

      Also please remind that doctor and god are not synonymous. Explain that the (g)odds are with you because you have decided you are well and grateful to the Universe for your excellent new physical and mental, whole being health. Also thank him for thecwrok he did.

      Doctors really have no right, IMHO, to sow such seeds of doubt.

      Im gonna go look at the mindfullness link. Feel better soon

      Best wishes

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      tara1429, you know your body and its symptoms, but if I had a headache for five days, I would be at the doctor's office. I would first take allergy medicine, which my headache would probably be caused by. Some people may know they have migraines and could take their medicine for that. Both types of headaches should get better after taking medicine.

      I knew someone who took sinus/allergy medicine for a headache. It didn't help, so she went to the doctor. She was having an aneurysm in her temple and they saved her life. If your headaches are from stress, you need to tell your primary care doctor to give you something for the stress, and possibly go to a counselor or support group.

      Don't wait two weeks to go to the doctor if it's a headache or chest pains. Best wishes.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Teelee3's Avatar
      Teelee3

      I was diagnosed with stage 2 colorectal cancer in 2015 which progressed to stage 4 in 2017. I've had numerous surgeries and many complications. My anxiety level is always lower when I'm in treatment. It's a weird phenomenon.
      What I repeat over and over to myself is... You can stress now and stress if it happens, which means you've put yourself through stress twice. You can stress now and it doesn't happen which means you've put yourself through stress once. Or you can not stress now and it doesn't happen and you won't have put yourself through stress at all. Stress will not change the outcome.
      Seems to help me:)

      almost 4 years ago
    • TFTAYLOR622's Avatar
      TFTAYLOR622

      Stage II TNBC here. I did feel very let down after treatment Chemo and Radiation. Partial breast removed. They told me the first 2 yrs were critical, and let me tell you the first 3 years were XXX for me. I became a very fearful person. I was sure I would be dead by the time I was 66. I retired thinking what is the point of working. Well here it is I am 70 returned to work because now I am not so sure of 401k holding out as long as me. (that is a very good thing) I am in 6yrs of survival, I hope now that I will die of something else besides cancer (and that is a good thing).

      over 3 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Ms. Taylor the things that are happening in the world today have me hoping that I die of cancer. I am afraid to go to any large gathering. And yesterdays events have me afraid to even go to church. At least with cancer you get a warning.

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      BoiseB, I saw the Pastor of the huge First Baptist Church of Dallas on TV today. He said they've had a security plan for awhile now that includes several minor things. In addition to having security there during church, it sounds like they had something similar to a fire drill to learn the best way to hide or leave if something happened. Some churches allow members with a concealed carry gun permit to carry a handgun into the church, since a permit requires a background check. They also don't allow backpacks to be brought into the church. Each church can decide what works for them. He recommended asking the police department to assess the church and make recommendations.

      Tell your Pastor your church needs a security plan for you to feel comfortable attending. Just having security is a deterrent to a possible shooter, because they know they won't be successful. Let me know what they do, because I'm worried about it, too.

      over 3 years ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Stage IV ovarian cancer always comes back. That's what I was told (and they were right). BUT I have told every single doctor that I have grandchildren that I want to watch grow and I have books to write so they need to work with me to make those things happen. Seems that once the medical people understand I'm all in, they go the extra mile too.

      over 3 years ago

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