• I got to talk to researchers today

    Asked by LiveWithCancer on Friday, April 19, 2019

    I got to talk to researchers today

    My medical clinic had me come in today to speak to some of the animal researchers in honor of today being BRAD - Biomedical Research Awareness Day. It was great to be able to thank the researchers for their hard work behind the scenes, searching tirelessly for cures or better treatments.

    Afterward, I got to tour some of the mice facilities. It was very interesting and I sure appreciated the doctor taking the time to show me around. We had to put garb on shoes, hair, body, and hands to protect the mice whose immune systems are compromised.

    The person who spoke after me was really interesting. He attended a rally for a young girl when he was doing post-doctoral work. She had a very rare disease - I think there are now 100 people in the world with it. It slowly robs the child of the ability to move ... sort of reminded me of ALS. Anyway, no child has lived past age 20. He was so moved by that family that he completely changed what he was going to do and has devoted his (see comments)

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      life to finding a cure for that little girl (and others like her). (He has a number of studies going on - all for very rare diseases, but the impetus was a little girl named Faith.)

      about 1 month ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Lucky you! They are indeed a very interesting, motivated bunch. If I had not been providentially introduced to a research hematologist, I would have been a cancer statistic in 2008. Since that introduction, I have participated in four clinical trials and one long-term study of a former trial drug. It was a modified version of a clinical trial regimen that placed me in full response in preparation for transplant.

      I strongly encourage those with relapsed, refractory or otherwise difficult cancers to consider participating in research. It is the only way in which the frontiers of medicine are advanced. One can receive advanced drugs and/or treatments years ahead of commercial avilability of the drug. In all cases, if the trial drug does not produce the expected response, one reverts back to standard therapy.

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Research is where it's at, without it I wouldn't be here today. One of the researchers working on Hodgkin's Disease years ago that was funded by grants from the American Cancer Society figured out the treatment regimen that works over 90% of the time in treating Hodgkins. I want to throat punch all the conspiracy theorists who say that all the money raised is just going in someone's pocket.

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      The guy who spoke after me thinks that some of the research he is doing into these rare neurological diseases might be transferrable into treating Parkinson's Disease one of these days.

      I had worried that I would not be able to understand anything in his presentation, but it was done in a way that non-medical people could follow right along. It was absolutely fascinating. I wish I could remember more of it...

      l learned too that the university system where I go for treatments and where I was giving the talk employs a number of veterinarians and vet techs who make sure that, while the animals are being used to test protocols before being used on people, are being treated in as absolute most humane way possible.

      One other thing I saw when I was given the tour of the mouse facility: mouse-sized CT and MRI scanners. :)

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      So many people get really upset about animal testing & research ~ until they get cancer or some other horrific disease. I'm an animal lover too. I hate cruelty, but I'm not at the point of being vegan. I eat meat & wear leather and I'm glad there are people out there doing this research.

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      I heard they're considering replacing research rats with lawyers ~ the public doesn't get so upset about it and the researchers don't become as attached to them.

      about 1 month ago
    • Shoeless' Avatar
      Shoeless

      BTW I have tried several times to comment on another page unsuccessfully. You said people often ask the difference between Hodgkin's lymphoma and Non~Hodgkin's lymphoma. The main difference between HL and NHL is the presence of an abnormal cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell, or Hodgkin's cell. This type of abnormal cell is only present in Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I agree, @Shoeless. I think they need to test on living beings before taking the tests to humans. I've always thought so. I don't want frivolous testing done and I don't want to the animals treated cruelly, but I think the testing is necessary. Sometimes, the cures they find benefit animals, too ... so there is that :) :)

      I think testing on lawyers is a fine idea :) :) (But better by far would be Congress - Democrats and Republicans.)

      about 1 month ago
    • wmsavs' Avatar
      wmsavs

      @LiveWithCancer, very interesting information. Most times these seminars are recorded and can be accessed for your review. The review can allow you to follow along at your own speed, raise questions you may not had during the original seminar, and potentially rewind if you want to hear anything again.

      about 1 month ago

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