• I had a double mastectomy and now have car sickness and motion sickness when I walk any distance. Has this happend to anyone else?

    Asked by kellee on Sunday, March 11, 2012

    I had a double mastectomy and now have car sickness and motion sickness when I walk any distance. Has this happend to anyone else?

    8 Answers from the Community

    8 answers
    • teddyfuzz's Avatar
      teddyfuzz

      Hi Kellee. Are you on painkillers? That could be what is causing your motion sickness. I have never been motion sick in my life but when I take Vicodin it's hard to ride in the car or walk around without feeling like I'm going to barf. There are meds your doctor can prescribe for the motion sickness. Some are in pill form - I prefer the Scopalamine patch. It looks like a round band-aid. You stick it behind your ear and it lasts for 3-4 days. I like it better than the pills because once I stick it on I don't have to worry about it for a while. The only drawback is that it makes your mouth a little dry.

      over 5 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      Ugh - that sounds sucky....

      Painkillers are definitely a possibility! In fact, just the other day, I had taken an oxycodone... and then suddenly felt lightheaded and nauseous in the kitchen - to the point that I thought - I'd better go lay down. Then, I remembered I had just taken that. It passed within a few minutes... and didn't come back.

      Another possibility, and I've HEARD of this happening but not seen much in the way of research, is that when you had your mastectomy, your fascia is damaged / cut / moved around.... This is tissue that is throughout your body and is somehow involved in balance etc... I've heard of women having trouble with balance after mastectomy... and wonder if your motion sickness could possibly be related to that?

      No matter what - I would say - TALK TO YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS - they should be able to help you... with meds or with other ideas or maybe even some PT.

      GOOD LUCK

      Lee

      over 5 years ago
    • kellee's Avatar
      kellee

      Thanks Ladies. My Dr.s think it is all psychosomatic. I feel all liguids going down and filling in the chest wall if theyare above or below my body temperature too. They say they ahve never heard of this. I thought myabe because I weigh 98lbs that there was not any fat to insulate the area; they said no to that too. I am off meds for now and susoect to be back on when my chemo starts in a few weeks. I plan on staying home for the duration.

      over 5 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      Hey! I have that weird feeling when I drink too! When I drink something cold, I feel like it spreads out behind my chest wall! I think it's a weird nerve thing. When I drink something hot, it's actually quite pleasant... Did you have many lymph nodes out? Did you at least have the sentinel node biopsy? I had only that, and they were cancer-free, so no extra nodes were taken... Anyway, at times, I would also swear to you that I still have nipples, although that sensation is backing off. I'm about one month out from bilateral mastectomy. I have not had the motion sickness issues nor the balances issues that I've heard about.... But I've never seen anything written about these issues. Anyway, it doesn't seem all that unheard off, considering that we've lost two body parts in this process.

      I know one person who has never gotten her balance quite right again - she used to blame the chemo... but now she blames the bilateral mastectomy. Who knows what the truth is...

      I'm suspect anytime they tell a person psychosomatic unless this is something you're already prone too.

      I'm seeing my doc on Friday, and I plan to tell him about the weird cold feeling I get when I drink cold things. I'll see what he says. He's the head of a big department etc... Maybe he knows something about this. I'll be sure to check back here and share what I learn.

      Good luck with your healing. I hope that the chemo goes smoothly... I wish you minimal side effects but maximal efficacy.

      over 5 years ago
    • kellee's Avatar
      kellee

      Yes, I had some cancer in the tailend of the sentinel node; they took 15; the rest were clear. I dislocated my arm yesterday doing my exercises and hope someone at Moffitt will put it back in place tomorrow; I have my first oncology appointment at 9:00. I did not need this too. I agree, warm liquids feel soothing. I get the cold nipple sensations too.

      over 5 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      DRAT - forgot to ask my doc today... Ok - email sent... He is always very responsive on the email....

      over 5 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Maybe you are asking the wrong kind of doctors? You said your first oncology appointment was just a few days ago? Have you talked to your oncologist about it? If they don't see any cancer/surgery cause for it, maybe they can refer you to a different kind of doctor (neurologist or internist maybe?).

      over 5 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn (Best Answer!)

      Good morning!
      My surgical oncologist came through! He always does - I put a "no rush" in the subject line of my email to him... and he got back to me today.

      So, in regards to the weird cold sensation spreading behind your chest wall when drinking cold fluids - HIS RESPONSE: I have heard this issue on several other occasions and agree that it is a weird nerve thing with no good explanation other than a referred dysesthesia ( med speak for funny nerve sensation).

      So, you are NOT crazy... and neither am I? Hmmm - oh wait... But at least I'm not crazy in regards to this particular sensation!

      Have a good morning.

      over 5 years ago

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