• I have two questions regarding hair loss.

    Asked by Charlieb on Wednesday, August 1, 2012

    I have two questions regarding hair loss.

    The first question is since loosing my hair, my scalp always seems to feel hot. Has anyone else experienced this sensation after loosing their hair? The second question is dealing with my hair growing back. My hair seems to coming back only on the sides of my head and not on the top. Also, I had a full beard which I lost also and now only a small part of my mustache is coming back. What experience have other people had with their hair growing back?

    12 Answers from the Community

    12 answers
    • leepenn's Avatar

      how long has it been since your last chemo?
      it was a solid two months before i had hair enough that i really felt like i had hair again.
      i think at about four months, i had a thick head of hair again....
      and it was super curly!
      so, the answer might be.... patience?

      about 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar

      I lost my hair twice, once with chemo, and again only in the back half of my head with radiation. First the chemo made it fall out all over, once it fell out I stayed bald for a few months, when chemo was over it grew back. Mine came back every where, but under my arms. Strange, no arm pit hair. Was curly in the back, now straight. The radiation made it fall out where I was being hit with it. It grew back in a finer texture. Feeling hot, I did not have that sensation.

      Best of luck to you in your treatments!

      about 4 years ago
    • Charlieb's Avatar

      It has only been 2 months and I am even surprised that hair is growing back. I have heard about it coming back different, just not coming back in patches. I don't mind being bald, I just don't want hair only on the side and bald on top.
      The other thing is this feeling like my scalp is always hot. I'd never seen that anywhere.

      about 4 years ago
    • Cindy's Avatar

      My scalp and eyebrows were sensitive and itchy when I lost my hair. I lost hair all over including my legs, underarms and most of my eyelashes and eyebrows. My scalp did not feel hot. My hair grew out evenly all over my head. It started growing out very curly for the first two inches. It is now growing out straight on top with curls on the ends.

      about 4 years ago
    • Rose's Avatar

      I hear that the hair can grow back sporadically, so be patient it'll grow back.

      Chemo lowers your immune system and maybe what your experiencing has something to do with that, like allergies. I did. Have you taken your temperature to see if you have a low grade fever?

      Most of my hair loss was a welcomed thing. ;)
      I didn't have to shave my legs, underarms or mustache! lol

      My head hair has finally started to grow back though. It's about 1/2 an inch long now. It's long enough to start to lay down!

      My eye brows are trying to grow back in, but I pluck them. I don't have the patience to watch them grow back in so slowly. So I continue to pencil or brush them on. I just have to be mindful of them and try not to accidentally rub one or both of them off or rub a part of them off! ;)

      I hope everything turns out great for you and your condition.

      about 4 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar

      For dad, his hair grew back pretty much the same as before, except curlier. It was thinner when it started. His facial hair does not grow back in as fast. You look good bald. I'd shave the sides and give it time.

      I haven't heard about the hot head.

      about 4 years ago
    • creed0608's Avatar

      Hello! My husband had radiation of the brain and Temodar pills...they say it was the radiation not the chemo that caused his hair loss. He ended radiation in July, 2011, and didn't start to get any peach fuzz or anything in that particular area until November or so. He decided to grow it back starting Jan 1 of this year. While it is not as thick as the other parts of his hair, he does have a full head of hair and had his first haircut back in April or so. What is strange is that he was starting to gray pretty good when all started and the radiation removed all the gray in the area that was targeted! Didn't feel any hotness though...best of luck in your treatments! Stay positive and keep the faith!

      about 4 years ago
    • Carol-Charlie's Avatar

      Hi Charlie.. I'm not the norm when discussing hair loss. I was 62 when after one cycle of chemo, my hair was falling out. My son had loaned me his hair clippers. My husband and I went into the bathroom and stood in front of the mirror and removed my Clairol Blonde hair... Then he told me I looked like my brother, and to my shock... I did.. We laughed... my brother when told, didn't see the humor... I had Stage IV Ovarian Cancer... I had almost two full years of chemo, and when you add in 5 or 6 PET CT Scans.... My hair fought hard.... Now 6 1/2 years later (Cancer Free) I have what I refer to as "Male Pattern Baldness"... I have hair growing thick as normal around my hairline... and then look like I'm wearing one of those caps that Friar Tuck wore in Robin Hood. I never went without hair, I had purchased a wig. My head always felt warm/hot... I've always thought it was the wig... Now I've found PaulaYoung.com 's cool wigs, and they are. My hair is back, I'm sure as far as it's going to be... 6+ years... I thank God that I'm here and healthy.. holding grand and great grand kids. going to family weddings, etc. If I were a man... I'd have a crew cut and wear it proudly. I used to have a touch of a moustache that I hated and dealt with .... I don't anymore... Shave my legs once a month now... and life is good. Charlie You look handsome in your picture... Just keep smiling and hold your head high. As I've always told my husband. God made a few perfect heads... the rest he covered with hair. (Now he says it to me)

      about 4 years ago
    • Ivy's Avatar

      As a female who is still in chemotherapy, I can't answer anything about your mustache, but the scalp problems are something I'm totally familiar with. According to my dermatologist, the scalp feeling hot is related to scalp folliculitis (inflamation of the hair follicules of the scalp). I had extremely thick hair before chemotherapy. Now I have light stubble. The dermatologist says that each chemotherapy session causes some more hair to fall out while other hair previously lost has follicules that are trying to reactivate growth and need to punch through the skin. This can cause an infection.. A side effect of chemo, or just a side effect of skin that is too sensitive, can be this folliculitis. The first time I had it was the worst. (Red bumps and intense itching and scalp pain were present for over 2 weeks.) Now when the scalp starts to get hot, I go back to using the topical prescriptions to control it: clindamycin lotion and triamcinolone lotion. Using these (for 2 weeks at a time, and then off the medication for 1 week before starting over again) controls the symptoms, and nothing as bad as the first time has happened again. Wearing anything tight on the head is extremely irritating, so mostly I stay home with a bare head or wear a loose-fitting hat when going out of the house. I have a lovely, expensive wig and many scarves, but wearing them irritates my scalp. So they have to wait until a few weeks after chemotherapy ends. Before I saw my dermatologist I did extensive research on the web, and folliculitis is recognized as a problem caused by chemotherapy, most often by the chemotherapy drug taxol, but probably not limited to that. You might note whether your entire scalp feels hot or whether it is just in certain areas. If you're having folliculitis, the hot areas are more likely where some degree of folliculitis is present. It probably would be a good idea to see a dermatologist. My oncologist team recognized the problem and acknowledged that it is a side effect of chemotherapy but wanted it treated by my own dermatologist.

      Good luck with it!

      about 4 years ago
    • blondie's Avatar

      Had my hair shaved by a women who has a shop that caters to cancer patients. When she shaved my hair she also noticed that the hair was still growing, Found a wig that matched my hair color. Dad did not know it was a wig. When my hair grew back it was black. There is no black hair in our family. Wear a cap or a scarf to keep your head cool.

      about 4 years ago
    • attypatty's Avatar

      Dear Charlieb:
      I had the same sort of experience as you describe. When I began to lose my hair, my scalp itched like crazy. When the hair started to grow back, my scalp felt warm, which made it difficult to wear the scarves I had been to cover my bald head. When I had enough around my ears and along the back of my neck, I opted for hats which helped with the heat on my scalp. I also have uneven growth with the sides growing in faster than the top. What is interesting to me that it's kind of like last out, last in. Or maybe first out, first in. Either way, the hair on the top of my head fell out last and is coming in last.
      It just takes time for it all to come back. Chances are that our hair always grew in that pattern, but we just would never know it.
      Fight On:

      about 4 years ago
    • Fusionera's Avatar

      For my 3rd brain surgery, which occurred in 2011, I decided to have my whole head shaved and I donated my hair. For my prior 2 surgeries I only had half of my head shaved, and it was slow to come back. After my 2nd surgery there was more shaved from the left side than with the first, so I had a thin gaggle of hair. I covered my head with hats when I went back to work. It grew in slowly, but I found some help by using Nioxin products (available at beauty salons and sometimes at Costco). There is a leave-in treatment that helped my hair grow back. My hair is thinner and finer underneath on the right side of my head where I had surgery, but fortunately my hair did come back. I have not had the issue of the scalp feeling hot so I cannot be of help there.

      about 4 years ago

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