• I live alone, will treatments allow me to drive 30 min to my home?

    Asked by Patisblonde on Tuesday, March 31, 2015

    I live alone, will treatments allow me to drive 30 min to my home?

    I have no friends, or support set up. How will I get back and forth to clinic for treatments if too sick to drive 30 miles.

    14 Answers from the Community

    14 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      See if they have Free Transportation.
      Is that the closest place you can go?
      Are you on Medicaid?
      Some on this site will have good answers for you so just sit tight.
      Good Luck and You CAN live a LONG Natural Life....hang in there.

      over 5 years ago
    • Patisblonde's Avatar
      Patisblonde

      No I live 30 min one way from the cancer treatment center, there is no free transportation to where my old home sits in the woods. I'm really trying to find a nice cheap apt but there are none available.

      over 5 years ago
    • Penny82's Avatar
      Penny82

      What kind of treatment are you concerned about? Different treatment have different side effects. You may not have any problem with getting treatment. Let the facility know your dilemma there may be a program that they know of.

      over 5 years ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Is there a church group that would help you out? Even if you don't belong, they could be a good resource. I would at least check with them.
      Also check with the American Cancer Society. There are groups that help give rides to cancer patients.
      Are you going to have chemo? It may make you ill and you shouldn't drive because of the drugs they put in you.
      Also, check with the cancer center you are going to. My hospital had a van service that picked me up every day for radiation, and then would wait for me and take me home when I was finished. I'm hoping something works out for you. It's not easy going through cancer treatments. God bless you.

      over 5 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Ask the American Cancer Society about help. Also Go to the LIVESTRONG Foundation at this link http://www.livestrong.org/we-can-help/ The LIVESTRONG foundation offers a free Guidebook and that I wish I had had when I first began cancer treatment. You can order it free at this link. http://www.livestrong.org/we-can-help/guidebook/
      Prayers for your recovery.

      over 5 years ago
    • Asanayogini's Avatar
      Asanayogini

      Maybe you can drive to short destination and then be picked up and dropped off there. That is another option

      over 5 years ago
    • timetolive's Avatar
      timetolive

      Check with your community service to see if you can get a health aide.You should be eligible for help from the state.State Welfare Dept. maybe.How about Dept of Human Services ? H ope you're feeling better and that you get help.

      over 5 years ago
    • cjs7159's Avatar
      cjs7159

      Like others have said, the American Cancer Society has programs that can help. I live in a very small town in PA & we have an organization called Diakon that has volunteer drivers for this kind of transport. It is a Lutheran ministry. Check in your area to see if this kind of service is available. Be strong, take one day at a time, & never give up. Let us know if you need any other info.

      over 5 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I also live alone, with minimal support. My oncologist was reluctant to let me drive after chemo until he realized I only live about 3 miles from the treatment center and it's a straight shot down the main road the center is off. I honestly had no problems driving after chemo -- I wasn't dizzy or nauseous or overly tired. I do agree w/what's been said -- check w/ACS -- they solicit volunteers to drive patients to and from treatment. Good luck.

      over 5 years ago
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      Another option is to stay overnight at the hospital, in a room they usually reserve for family, patients from outside the area. If you are treated at a large hospital, they might have Hope Lodge, or something similar. Hopefully, you would be able to drive home the next day.

      over 5 years ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      I'm not sure what your treatments entail but I was certainly capable of driving to & from chemo. I didn't get sick until about 48 hours after each treatment. When I started I was worried & asked the nurse if anyone ever gets sick during treatment & she said no. When I got very sick twice while on chemo I actually drove myself to the ER & my husband had to make arrangements to get my car when I got admitted so we didn't end up with a huge parking tab.

      over 5 years ago
    • Blazin's Avatar
      Blazin

      I have CLL and Ive always been able to drive home after treatments about 1/2 hour away. what treatments will you be doing, if we know we might be able to answer you better if we have done the same treatments. personally in almost 7 yrs I've had very little side effects, but we are all different.

      over 5 years ago
    • Patisblonde's Avatar
      Patisblonde

      I jumped the gun with my question, what to do after treatments, I live alone. I think I'm in the very early stage, but with this disease, you never know if it will go slow or speed up. I don't need to worry any one about my first question. And I appreciate all the replys, I saved them for later. Right now just dealing with the diagnosis, having a needle biopsy on lymph node, and then maybe have it totally removed. Will let you know my progress. Thanks everyone!

      over 5 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Someone from the community put up a site:

      http://managecancer.org/

      over 5 years ago

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