• NJT's Avatar

    I'm newer to side effects from chemo but last tx. socked it to me-numbness in toes and fingers-does this last? it's been 2 weeks

    Asked by NJT on Saturday, January 26, 2013

    I'm newer to side effects from chemo but last tx. socked it to me-numbness in toes and fingers-does this last? it's been 2 weeks

    also constipation constant problem-taking laxitives-but stomach feels in knots-is this because of constipation or just GI side effects; one more thing...legs extremely weak..is this just all
    "normal" side effects?

    16 Answers from the Community

    16 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      It's call peripheral neuropathy. My last chemo treatment was in late March and I still have it. Are you taking steroids or pain meds? They often cause constipation. Chemo drugs more often cause diarrhea.

      about 4 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      Hello. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy-- numbness and tingling in your hands and feet caused by chemo-- can last until after your chemo is complete, can get better, or it may stick around. My dad has been through two different cancers for which he received chemotherapy. With the first cancer, the neuropathy did get better a few months after chemo stopped. This time around, he stopped chemo in October, and he still has his tingling in his feet. I would ask your doctor about what you might take to help alleviate this if it becomes painful or uncomfortable for you.

      For constipation, the best thing that has worked for dad is Miralax, and Senna-S, a store brand of Senokot-S

      about 4 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
    • karen1956's Avatar
      karen1956

      I had horrid tummy upsets....GERD type stuff...onc Rx Nexium for me....also tended to go on a bland diet....this lasted for several months post chemo.....some neuropathy in fingers, but not limiting......gabapentin can sometimes help with neuropathy...or Lyrica....

      about 4 years ago
    • JennyMiller's Avatar
      JennyMiller

      I finished Chemo in April 2012. I have some numbness in just one finger and thumb. I think it may be starting to improve as I am not as aware of it --- or I could be just getting used to it. I think everyone is different in regards to having this side effect and to how long it lasts. As for the constipation -- I would have bouts of it to the point of impaction -- so painful and stressful. Then, I would have bouts of diarrhea whereby I would have embarrassing accidents. Either condition would cause stomach discomfort for me. The fatigue caused me to feel weakness all over including legs. Do you take Neulesta shot on day following Taxol? I did and I was told that if I take Claritin (not Claritin D) that I could avoid the bone pain from the Neulesta Shot and it worked for me. Side effects can be so different for people -- At first, I had a nagging cough that went day and night -- preventing much needed sleep -- then I had a pain in the wall of my neck after the first few sessions (not a sore throat) -- then I had sores in my throat -- etc. Now that it is over, it seems like a bad dream and I can move forward from it. And -- soon -- you will be able to do the same. Good Luck!!

      about 4 years ago
    • DorothyV's Avatar
      DorothyV

      My second dose of chemo (taxotare and cytoxin) was the worst. Side effects lasted almost 2 weeks until it was time for the next dose. I had the weakness in my legs after the second, third, and fourth doses. Talk to your onc or his nurse about each of these symptoms. He can tell you what will work. Good luck with everything. Sorry you are going through this. It will get better. God bless :)

      about 4 years ago
    • SusanK's Avatar
      SusanK

      My chemo consisted of taxotere and cytoxan, 6 rounds of it. I alternated between diarrhea and constipation. A chemo nurse recommended a cocktail--prune juice, apple juice, and Vernor's ginger ale, 6 oz. of each--to help the constipation (she called it a "butt bomb" !), and I sometimes paired it with a stool softener. Tingling, numbness, leg pain--likely neuropathy. I experienced the tingling but not to the extreme. When my side effects worried me, I called the infusion room and talked to the nurses who were a huge help in alleviating my fears and recommending help. If they thought I was experiencing anything unusual or serious, they talked to my oncologist and arranged for a prescription for me. I know this is such a tough time for you. Good luck.

      about 4 years ago
    • jad's Avatar
      jad

      I just finished my last round of CT and have had many of those side effects, plus some others. Colace with lots of water helped me. Also, I discovered prunes --- the big bag at Costco. Fortunately I love them. And I think carrots helped me more than beans, although they helped too. I would have a few bad days and by the end of the cycle was back to normal. Having completed the CT I have to say the peripheral neuralgia, nail and fingertip pain, and fatigue - especially fatigue are bigger problems. Now I anticipate the fatigue of radiation. I have never been a napper in my life --- now some days I can do nothing but. I took Claritin (regular) the day before chemo and for about a week after. Sometimes with some tyelenol (acaetominophin). I think it did help alleviate the pain, but not take it away completely. I tried to keep active, walking outdoors when weather permitted - but I found that sometimes my knee or ankle joints would sometimes buckle and I had to be careful to avoid falling. If you do take tyelenol be sure to have a lot of water with it. I like to think the water is washing all the toxins including stray ca cells out of my body - so I drink a lot of it.

      about 4 years ago
    • jad's Avatar
      jad

      Forgot to mention the peripheral neuropathy causes me some tears and depression. I hope hope hope it will gradually dissipate as nerves recover. But I know that is not always the case. I do NOT want to take any medications for it as I think they alleviate symptoms not cure the problem. (Experts: correct me here if I'm wrong). My mother lived many years with the problem (caused by something else, not chemo) and I see myself doing the same.

      about 4 years ago
    • gogolf's Avatar
      gogolf

      I used stool softener and dried prunes f

      about 4 years ago
    • gogolf's Avatar
      gogolf

      I used stool softener and dried prunes for constipation and maybe it they are not as hard on the stomach as laxatives. This worked both times I had chemo, once in a while it worked to well and then I had to have take an Imodium. It take a little while to figure out the right amount but with the prunes I tried to use only 3 at a time. Take Care, Hugs

      about 4 years ago
    • princess123's Avatar
      princess123

      I have been on chem break for 4 months and still have neuropathy in my feet.
      I take senna S for comstipation. It has less cramping. Dried Apricots are similar to prunes. Douple up on your Senna s or what ever your taking untill you get it right. At first I had a lot of constipation and then it leveled off. I also was told by my onc to take MiraLax if the constipation keeps up. This is a no tast powder you mix with water or juice. If you over do the laxiatives back off but don't stop all together. My onc told me this. Try taking 2 senna s morning and night and then if that isn't helping add the MiraLax. Follow directions. Senna s has less cramping as some of the others.
      Good luck. It will level off and you will get accustomed to the routine of it all.

      about 4 years ago
    • debco148's Avatar
      debco148

      Same thing happened to me on Taxol. Called Neuropathy. It can go away or be permanent in some cases. Ask your Oncologist what you can do for it while still on chemo. Vitamin B6 helps alot, but don't take any supplements until you clear it with your doctor. Also, I had terrible pain in my legs.. all the way down to my bone. Horrible. This was worsened by the shot of Neulasta (keeps blood counts up). If yor take pain meds for that.. this also causes constipation. Constipation is probably from all the other stuff like steroids, etc that they gave you. Drink lots of fluids and eat fruit and veggies as much as possible. Even fruit smoothies. The fluid in the intestine dries up with this stuff so you have to keep pumping it back in. Even on Tamoxifen now I notice some constipation.. I add fruit to salads now too and eat more fiberous foods. Best of luck.. pulling for you!

      about 4 years ago
    • laurie2025's Avatar
      laurie2025

      The numbness can be helped by taking vitamin B6, separately from other vitamins. I take 300 mg a day. It does help me. My doctor is having me take Sennikott which is a natural, mild laxative, because I am prone to constipation. Maybe check with him?

      about 4 years ago
    • Nomadicme's Avatar
      Nomadicme

      As others mentioned, it's peripheral neuropathy and it will likely get worse with more chemo. The good news is that it gets better after chemo is over (although duration varies). Be more mindful when walking and such, as you could stub your toes and make things worse (better to know these things right?).
      Constipation, that's my friend now lol (I had the runs so bad during chemo my onc though I could have c. Difficile, which I didn't. What's do now, I take 2 tablespoons of psyllium husks diluted in one glass of water, and follow it with one glass of water, 3 x a day. It works like a charm, not to mention it helps me feel full. Psyllium husks can be bought at some markets, if not there's always amazon.com (they're the active ingredient of Metamucil, but without the sugary calories Metamucil uses for,flavor. Not to mention psyllium husks are way cheaper. Not everyone is happy about drinking down this stuff, but honestly if you can take chemo this is not a big deal. My cousin was all grossed out, picky thing).

      about 4 years ago
    • DaveWaz's Avatar
      DaveWaz

      NJT, Thank you for sharing your experience with us.

      Conversation around the topic of neuropathy inspired a blog article on our site that you may find helpful.

      Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy - What, Why, and How
      http://www.whatnext.com/blog/posts/chemotherapy-induced-peripheral-neuropathy-what-why-and-how

      This article might help you and others gain insights on what is happening; it also points to related questions about neuropathy on the site.

      David

      over 3 years ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more breast cancer questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Breast Cancer page.