• I was just diagnosed with omentum carcinomatosis and will undergo surgery. Had radiation in 1985 for cervical cancer.

    Asked by Rita120451 on Wednesday, April 18, 2012

    I was just diagnosed with omentum carcinomatosis and will undergo surgery. Had radiation in 1985 for cervical cancer.

    The doctor said there was a 1% of this happening since I had a complete hysterectomy and do not have my ovaries. I feel doomed and I haven't even had surgery yet. I had PET/CT scan and the surgeon is now out of town so I can't get the results for another week. Should I stick with him or go to someone else? Isn't it important that your doctor be available? Am I being overly anxious? His office staff has been great and says the doctor left specific instructions to meet with me on April 24th but in the meantime I'm thinking the cancer is spreading. I'm panicking. Is this normal???

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • whirl's Avatar
      whirl

      What people often don't realize and maybe not told, just because you have a hyst. it doesn't mean you can't have cancer in that area. Ovarian cancer is an example. While it reduces your risk of reoccurrence it is not zero. I have had a double mastectomy and was told my risk for reoccurrence is 10%. Should you change doctors you have to make the dicision. Is he/she a person you can relate and discuss the situation easily. What are their qualifications. How are they perceived in the community. I know waiting a week is an eternity to one waiting for the results, but in the scheme of things changing doctors will take much longer to get established. For me by the time I had the mammagram to starting chemo was 3 1/2 months. I didn't really tarry. All the diagnosing tests and schedules it just gets later and later. Just try to be patient, keep busy, and look at the plus(s) and minus(s)before you change if then.

      about 5 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      As whirl noted, if the only reason you are asking about changing doctors is because your current one is out of town for a week, you will most likely spend more time finding and seeing a new doctor just to get to the point you started from with the current one. No doctor is going to be available to each of their patients 24/7 but most have partners or other doctors they work with to handle critical issues when they are unavailable. Since you already have an appointment set up with him, in his professional opinion, there is no medical need prior to then. Also as whirl noted, it is typically weeks and often even months from time of diagnosis until treatment begins. One week is not likely to make a difference even with an aggressive cancer.

      about 5 years ago
    • Lirasgirl33's Avatar
      Lirasgirl33

      I panicked too. After diagnosed with cervical cancer through cervical biopsy, I had to wait 2 weeks until they could get the tumor and affected lymph nodes out through radical hysterctomy. I know the whole thing of cancer spreading was in the back of my mind too. I tried my hsrdest not to think about it and not lose sleep over it. Just breathe.....one week will go by fast. As hard as it may be to do...try to relax....the doc will see you soon and you can move on to the next step in treatment. You will get through this.

      about 5 years ago
    • Rita120451's Avatar
      Rita120451

      Thank you all for your support. I was able to meet with my surgeon today and he answered all of my questions. I have "debulking" surgery scheduled for April 30th and hope he will be able to surgically remove all the cancer. Since I had a hysterectomy and my ovaries removed I had a 1% chance of this happening. It's genetic. My sister had the same thing. The doctor said I could have chemo before the surgery or just have the surgery with chemo to follow. It's a big surgery with risks involved but I'm healthy and shouldn't have too many problems. I'm scared and feel doomed and I don't know why. The doctor seems optimistic and said although not curable it's treatable. I've got a great husband, my sister and good friends. I want to think positive but it's hard. I feel like this is the beginning of the end. Frame of mind is everything and mine isn't too good right now. Geez, this is tough. How do you be strong through all this?

      about 5 years ago
    • Lirasgirl33's Avatar
      Lirasgirl33 (Best Answer!)

      Take it one day at a time....I know it's hard but don't overwhelm yourself with stuff that hasn't happened yet. Take scans, surgery, treatment....as it comes and again...one day at a time. You can do this. Don't let this stop you from living life. You live for yourself and for all those people who love you. Let that be your strength. Your emotional, spiritual, overall attitude will play a big part in the treatment process so please don't lose hope and gather as many people to cheer you on in your journey. This too will pass. Sending you love and hugs your way.

      about 5 years ago
    • Rita120451's Avatar
      Rita120451

      Yes, lirasgirl33, thank you. I'm trying to take one day at a time and I think you are right that I should surround myself with all those who love me. I am just scared and need to stay focused. Thank you for being there. I very much and deeply appreciate your support...it means the world to me.

      about 5 years ago
    • Joanna99's Avatar
      Joanna99

      It is very normal to panic when you can't get answers. When I was not getting answers to my questions, I turned to the Amer. Cancer Society. I talked with some very understanding nurses. I was originally told I had ovarian cancer, but after surgery it was changed to Primary Peritoneal by the pathologists, however, my doctors still refer to it as ovarian. They even constantly remind me to watch for the symptoms of ovarian. I don't have any ovaries. One doctor even said after surgery that I can't get cancer of an organ that I don't have anymore, yet he still talks of a possible recurrence. I don't get it. When I question about that, I get the feeling that they just lump all cancers in that area together and call it ovarian. Key thing is, we have lots of body parts, any of which can get cancer, so we need to be on our guard at all times. As Larry King says, "question, question, question."

      over 3 years ago

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