• If you are done with treatments, or past all the major procedures do you find that your doctor(s) want you to come back regularly

    Asked by GregP_WN on Friday, September 8, 2017

    If you are done with treatments, or past all the major procedures do you find that your doctor(s) want you to come back regularly

    I'm talking about a doctor's office visit, with no tests being done, just more or less, come see us. Of course, there will be a bill. If they are not doing tests, and just want you to come back for simply "an office call", I think they are just playing the numbers game for insurance and cash payments. Sort of ticks me off! Anyone have any of this going on?

    16 Answers from the Community

    16 answers
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Nope.

      I quit them.

      over 4 years ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      I finished chemo in May 2014, radiation in July 2014, and Herceptin in Jan. 2015. I see my breast surgeon every 6 months, my oncologist every 6 months, and my radiologist once a year. I have no problem with seeing the breast surgeon and oncologist. I am glad to have a second set of eyes. However, I see the radiologist next week, and I plan on that being my last visit to him.

      over 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      2016, I was put on 12 month visits-but I see so many doctors every 12 months.
      I had a rare-incurable that started off as BCC. Experimental radiation burnt it out.

      They are worried about a radiation caused cancer, so they do extensive blood work each year. Last month I had a miserable urinary infection-sort of odd. It wuld bother me, I'd decide to see a doctor, and it went away. Then about a week later it hit me again. It went like this for a few weeks. I went into the ER, because it became firm and hurtful problem on a weekend. Everyone freaked out about this--The ER doctor was delighted because the labs didn't show anything for kidney problems/failure from statin poisoning, radiation, or cancer.

      Anyway, I see my ENT-nose-mouth cancer site, oncology radiologist that did the experiment, a hemotology oncologist-in a survivorship program at a new clinic, dermatology, I see my ENT more than the others. With the grey smokey skies for over 2 weeks, allergies finally got the best of me- and that seemed to turn into the flu. My nose is on fire, and feels like it will burst open. If this goes on, I'll go into primary care next week and try to get an antibiotic.

      over 4 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I'm almost 5 yrs out from the end of treatment. Since my surgeon's office fired me, I only see my medical oncologist. It is MY choice to do so. At this point, I only have someone following up on me every 6 months.

      over 4 years ago
    • Kris103's Avatar
      Kris103

      I finished the majors in February 2015. Since then, I've been seeing my surgeon once a year and my radiation oncologist twice a year. With the surgeon, it seems more like an office call thing, but since she's my favorite, I don't mind too much. The rad onc orders my mammograms annually, and will be following up on me until I'm 5 years out. I started out seeing the medical oncologist every 3 months, but am now at every 4 months. Further out will be at 6 months. He's the one prescribing the exemestane, so I expect to be seeing him for however long I'm on it.

      over 4 years ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      Yes I have follow up visits that dwindle over time. Started I saw 1 of them every 2 months. I am now at every 3 months & I expect to reduce to every 6 months. I like seeing them. They do check my mouth & neck for any lumps and if I have any issues. And they are still working on my voice & swallowing. but no actual treatments each visit. I get some security seeing them. I can discuss any "symptoms" I may be having & they can reassure that it is not the cancer most times. It was at 1 of these visits that the recurrence was caught. So yes it is a numbers game, but I feel more comfortable seeing them, than not. And I probably will be seeing them at least annually for the rest of my life.

      over 4 years ago
    • SteveG's Avatar
      SteveG

      The oncologists and ENT wanted to see me on a regular basis after my base of tongue cancer. The ENT saw me every other month during the second year and found my sinus cancer. He referred me to his classmate who by then was a professor at the medical school. Now I have two ENTs who want to see me and they don't coordinate appointments. I will see both the same day October 2.

      over 4 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Just a ruse BUT IF you have new symptoms go to see them...SOME Like going back with no reason just to touch base and that's ok.

      over 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Steve-- lucky you about your ENT appointments. Sarcasim-meaning I don't envey your schedule

      I ended up with mine all clumped togther, one a day for a week. I need to get mine spread out better for next year.

      over 4 years ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Three years from treatment I am seen ever six months, with my CA 125 blood test ( a blood test that is a good marker for me and my type of cancer ) drawn every three months per my request. Every six months I have a pelvic exam, so not a waste of time,however I think they could dispense with the every visit weigh in and temp taking.

      over 4 years ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I still see the doctor every six months for a checkup. I just seen the chemotherapy doctor. I was seeing the radiation doctor and the surgeon too, but after another medical issue, I am just seeing the chemo doc. I will be a five year survivor in October. And I do get mammograms once a year.

      over 4 years ago
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      I'm a year out of Chemo, finished Radiation in Oct. I currently rotate between my Radiation Oncologist and chemo Oncologist, I see one of them every 3 months. No tests, but a pelvic exam. I will do so for the next couple of years, then down to 6 months for a while.

      I'm OK with that. I have good insurance and the co-pay for the visits is very manageable. Since the cancer caught me off-guard, I like having the appointments

      over 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Next year I will be 5 years cancer free. My PCP still does a complete physical twice a year. Because I am stage IV I will have a CT-scan every year and blood work twice a year. I will have a PAP smear done once a year. I am comfortable with this as last year I had to deal with some late effects that were life threatening. Also I have to have my throat stretched about every 2 years.

      over 4 years ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      I think it depends on the type and stage of cancer and if it's a recurrence or a secondary cancer. My second was a recurrence from my stage IIIA adeno LC back in 2010. In 2013, I had surgery as I didn't have it the first time and this was a local recurrence of only one tumor. I'm now 4 years out and at my last scan, my med onc wanted to go a year and I told her after this last scare, wasn't sure if it was cancer or scar tissue, I'd like to go 6 months and see then go to a year. And she was fine with that. I finished chemo after my surgery in November and that will be the 4 year mark for completion of treatment for the recurrence. And my next scan is in November. If you're concerned, then talk to your doctor about why you're being seen so often. You might be surprised by the answer!

      over 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      The surgery team that did my esophagectomy will follow me for life, because the surgery was experimental and I am basically a statistic. I really like this.

      over 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Same with me for the radiation-experimental.

      over 4 years ago

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