• Just curious, how long ago did you get diagnosed? I keep thinking I won't make it to be a long term survivor.

    Asked by HardyGirl on Wednesday, October 5, 2016

    Just curious, how long ago did you get diagnosed? I keep thinking I won't make it to be a long term survivor.

    16 Answers from the Community

    16 answers
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Three years and one month.....Still here...

      almost 3 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer
      almost 3 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer in 10/2012. I was supposed to live about 4 months.

      When I got my diagnosis, I made a pact with myself to live, really live, every day that I am alive. I have tried to honor that pact nearly every single day.

      almost 3 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I sure hope you are wrong, HardyGirl, and that you live a long, long time. Are you still in treatment? Is your cancer responding?

      almost 3 years ago
    • suzanne611's Avatar
      suzanne611

      I was diagnosed in 2010 with a one year prognosis I have leiomyosarcoma.

      almost 3 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I was diagnosed stage IVb endometrial cancer in Aug 2012. Prognosis at that time was a 5% chance of being here in 5 years. 4+ years later still going strong w/NED. When I was first diagnosed, I wondered if I should make plans, up to and including whether I should renew my magazine subscriptions. I drove around the campus of the local hospice, figuring I'd be there soon. I don't do that kind of stuff anymore.

      almost 3 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I was diagnosed with Stage IV esophageal cancer March of 2010 I was given 4 to six months to live. There was a 5% chance that a person with stage IV esophageal cancer would survive for 5 years.
      Fast forward to February 2013. I was diagnoses with a very aggressive (50% reoccurrence rate) uterine cancer stage III plus that my esophageal cancer had metastasized to my ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus ;prognosis one or the other or both would be back in 18 months.
      When I had clean scans in January of 2015, my Dr. said that I should get active in the political process because I would have to live with whom ever was elected. Didn't realize how bad a prognosis that was LOL :)

      almost 3 years ago
    • Vivbob's Avatar
      Vivbob

      Nearly 8 year survivor of Stage 1 breast cancer, 4 year survivor of kidney failure and given 2 weeks to live, on dialysis and had 2 good treatments out of 8, had 2 catheters, which both failed, after just the first dialysis treatment, and now 4 1/2 years later, my kidneys are nearly normal. Now I am a 1 1/2 year of Stage 111, C-1, Aggressive Endometrial Cancer, the Aggressive being that I have 2 kinds of cancer, Serous and Endometrial. I feel wonderful and will continue to feel that way until someone tells and shows me that I shouldn't. I am 78 years old and work every day for 3.5 hours with Food Service, serving lunch, doing dishes, cleaning and moping and getting my line ready for the next day. I enjoy each new day that God gives me and I thank God for each new day. Life is Good, God is Good. A friend from Iowa

      almost 3 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      14 years and counting on top of a 13 year search for a diagnosis.

      I had had a squamous cell carcinoma behind my anus.

      Boo boo all gone now.

      Prayers for no nore boo boos anything li in e that.

      almost 3 years ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Diagnosed three years ago with stage IIIC ovarian cancer. I have been in remission for 2 1/2 years.

      almost 3 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      6 and a half years in remission!

      almost 3 years ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      I was diagnosed stage 1V melanoma may 2014. Have a few small nodes they are watching but nodes have been stable for about two years now.

      almost 3 years ago
    • MyahsMom's Avatar
      MyahsMom

      I was diagnosed with Stage I breast cancer (found on a mammogram) back in 2009 and I'm still here. Had a lumpectomy and radiation. All check-ups have been great ever since.

      almost 3 years ago
    • MyahsMom's Avatar
      MyahsMom

      I was diagnosed with Stage I breast cancer (found on a mammogram) back in 2009 and I'm still here. Had a lumpectomy and radiation. All check-ups have been great ever since.

      almost 3 years ago
    • mjs24's Avatar
      mjs24

      Hysterectomy February 2011 endometrial cancer stage lll still kicking!

      almost 3 years ago
    • MsMope's Avatar
      MsMope

      I was diagnosed with endometrial cancer via pap test in October 2013. I had my hysterectomy in December 2013, and had chemo from January to May 2014 with vaginal brachytherapy in March 2014. I had stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma - one of the rarer endometrial cancers that accounts for about 40% of endometrial cancer deaths. This means my cancer is "high grade" which sorta negates the good staging.

      I think we all feel doomed when we get the diagnosis. When I got my diagnosis over the phone, I told the PA "I don't do cancer." I knew at that moment I was going to die. The PA said "Let's not get ahead of ourselves." I calmed down, and eventually learned that those were words of wisdom.

      For a long time, I remained certain I could not be one of the lucky ones. I could not think about the future, so I lived in the moment (which isn't such a bad way to live). After treatment ended, I stuck to the follow-up protocol for high grade cancer: check-ups every 3 months for two years.

      After two years of that, I transitioned to the next phase: check-ups every 6 months. Now that I'm in the third year after chemo, I feel better about my chances. Fewer check-ups allow me more time to live like a ordinary person rather than a survivor. In fact, I don't often think of myself as a survivor. I'd rather be ordinary.

      I don't know your circumstances. Everybody is different. Our cancers are different. Our treatment is different. Our underlying strengths and support systems are different. There is one consistent thing: we all have to figure out how to LIVE each day in a way that makes LIFE worth living.

      I've been lucky, and I wish (with all my heart) the same for you! -MM

      almost 3 years ago

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